The world's most in-depth and scientific reviews of tech gear

Best Smart Locks of 2018

In our opinion  the best smart feature on a lock is an old fashioned keypad  like those on the Schlage models.
Wednesday July 4, 2018
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Tired of carrying keys around? Wish you could let someone in your front door without actually having to be there? We bought and tested 6 of the most well regarded smart locks on the market in order to find the best solution to these problems. After spending over 100 hours using and abusing these locks, we don't really feel like the technology has yet reached its full potential. For most people we would recommend going with a simple, 'dumb' keypad lock instead of dealing with the possible complications of using a smart lock. However, some of these locks do currently occupy a useful niche, namely for people that own rental properties or that need to let lots of different dog walkers, contractors, cleaners, etc. into their home. If you fit into one of those categories, our testing results will help you find the best model.


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Awards Editors' Choice Award     
Price $260 List
$179.99 at Amazon
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$279.00 at Amazon
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$249.83 at Amazon
$170 List$150 List
$119.90 at Amazon
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Pros Simple keycode access sharing, easy keyless entryWorks well within Nest ecosystem, easy to installEasy installation, effective (though certainly not streamlined) access sharingGrade 1 ANSI security rating, convenience of a keypadEasy to install
Cons Lower ANSI security rating than other models, not the easiest to installRemote access sharing often malfunctions, no compatibility outside of Nest, no physical key backupKeyless entry can be slow and finicky, Alexa compatibility can be buggyCannot easily grant time-limited access, smart hub not includedLackluster smart features, keyless entry often slow
Bottom Line The best solution we’ve found for sharing and carefully controlling access to your homeA useful tool for existing Nest users, but problems with remote access sharing limit functionalityOverall acceptable performance, but doesn’t match the convenience or functionality of a keypad modelA high security rating only slightly makes up for limitations in remote access sharingMediocre smart features don’t really provide more value than a much cheaper and dumb keypad lock
Rating Categories Sense with WiFi Adapter x Yale with Connect Pro + Connect Z-Wave Connect Camelot August Smart
Smart Features (35%)
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Specs Sense with WiFi Adapter x Yale with Connect Pro + Connect Z-Wave Connect Camelot August Smart
Apple HomeKit Yes No Yes No No
Amazon Alexa Yes No Yes With Hub Yes
Google Assistant Yes No Yes No Yes

Best Overall Smart Lock


Schlage Sense with WiFi Adapter


Editors' Choice Award

$179.99
(31% off)
at Amazon
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Simple keycode access sharing
Easy keyless entry
Lower ANSI security rating than other models
Not the easiest to install

Of all the smart locks we tested, the Schlage Sense with WiFi Adapter is really the only one we would consider using in one of our own homes. The app lets you easily create time-limited keypad codes that can be texted to dog walkers, cleaners, or anyone else that might need access to your home on short notice. The installation certainly wasn't straightforward, but there are enough instructions and videos provided by Schlage that most should be able to figure it out. We also really liked that the keypad gave us the option to manually unlock if the Bluetooth connection between the lock and the phone was being a bit finicky.

Like all of the locks we tested, we had some trouble granting other phones access to the lock via the app. This meant that we had to let people in by giving them a keycode to punch in, rather than using their phones as a virtual key. We didn't really see this as a downside, as we'd rather hand out temporary keypad codes than make visitors download an app and make a Schlage account in order to open the door. We did have one isolated incident where a shared code did not work, requiring the smart hub to be reset before that code actually worked and granted access. So we can't say the Schlage Sense works 100% of the time, but it's pretty close. The lock is also certified at ANSI Grade 3 (the lowest security grading for deadbolts. This is likely plenty of security, but some may like the peace of mind that a higher grade lock brings. Overall the Schlage Sense is the best solution we've found for remotely providing other people access to your home.

In our opinion  the best smart feature on a lock is an old fashioned keypad  like those on the Schlage models.
In our opinion, the best smart feature on a lock is an old fashioned keypad, like those on the Schlage models.


Analysis and Test Results


Smart locks are certainly an evolving technology, and we feel that overall these products haven't quite realized their full potential. However imperfect the current selection of products, there are still some models that can solve some of our modern conundrums. We found these models by rigorously testing the reliability and usefulness of their smart features, how easy they are to install, their security level, and their overall user friendliness. You can read how all of our models performed in those tests below. For more on whether the current selection of smart locks might provide some value to you, take a look at our Buying Advice Article.

Value


In general, smart locks have not yet evolved to a point where there is a wide range of prices. Most retail in the neighborhood of $250, and those that are south of that mark generally don't come with an included smart hub. That means you'll need to spend another ~$100 on a hub in order to access their smart features. Therefore, the top performer is de facto also the best value, making the Schlage Sense with Wifi Adapter both our Editors' Choice winner, and the best overall value.

What About Amazon Key?
Amazon Key is a service that combines a keypad smart lock and an Amazon home security camera into a system that allows Amazon Prime deliveries to be placed inside your door, rather than left on your front stoop. If you've had multiple Amazon packages mysteriously disappear, this system may be a worthwhile investment. Currently Amazon only offers this service with specific Yale and Kwikset lock models that are more or less designed specifically for the Amazon Key system. Because these locks are mostly useful within the Amazon Key ecosystem we didn't test them for this review, which focuses on standalone smart locks. However, based on our experience with the Kwikset Kevo and the Nest x Yale, we would certainly lean towards getting one of the Yale locks if we were to use an Amazon Key system. You can read more about this service here.

The Schlage Sense offers the most usable smart features of all the locks we tested.
The Schlage Sense offers the most usable smart features of all the locks we tested.

Smart Features


Smart locks carry a hefty price premium when compared to their 'dumb' counterparts, so they need to offer reliable and useful smart features in order to be a worthwhile purchase. We used every smart features these locks offer, side-by-side, to assess both the relative usability and reliability of all these features. This included features like Bluetooth entry, keypad entry, compatibility with smart home platforms (Alexa, Apple HomeKit, Google Home, etc.), and activity logs. Much of our testing focused on granting third parties access to the lock remotely, as this is one of the most useful and common applications of smart lock technology. Generally, we found models that require using an app to share access somewhat clunky and unreliable, while those that utilize a keypad and temporary codes for access to be much more user friendly.


Two models took our top score of 7 out of 10 in our smart features testing: the Schlage Sense with WiFi Adapter and the August Pro + Connect. The Editors' Choice winning Schlage Sense offers activity logs, both Bluetooth and keypad entry, and almost universal smart home compatibility (Zigbee being the notable exception). What really endeared this lock to us was its ability to easily create temporary, time-constrained codes that could be texted to anyone you like. We did have one instance where one of those codes didn't work but in general they were convenient and effective. The activity log also accurately cataloged the use of those codes. Granting other people Bluetooth access (ie. open app, door unlocks) was somewhat problematic, but also not a feature we felt we'd really want to use anyway.

Remote locking and unlocking was one smart feature that worked well on all of the locks we tested.
Remote locking and unlocking was one smart feature that worked well on all of the locks we tested.

The August Pro + Connect also provided a fairly good smart home experience. It claims to play nice with most smart home platforms (Zigbee again being an exception), though we did have some issues getting it to work with Alexa. We had success in sharing Bluetooth access with other people via the app (essentially turning phones into Bluetooth keys). Overall we think this is slightly less convenient than using a keypad and sharing a code, as it forces the recipient to create an August account and download the app. However, once that is done the August Pro provides a detailed activity log, and lets you grant time-constrained access to individuals.

We ran into many glitches and bugs when sharing access with locks that require the recipient to download an app (like the Kevo and Nest  left and center). That's why we preferred the simplicity of the Schlage Sense  which simply sends a keycode via text (right).
We ran into many glitches and bugs when sharing access with locks that require the recipient to download an app (like the Kevo and Nest, left and center). That's why we preferred the simplicity of the Schlage Sense, which simply sends a keycode via text (right).

The Nest x Yale was a step below our top scorers in this category with an average score of 5 out of 10. It limits its smart home compatibility to Nest's own Connect Hub, so no using it with Alexa or Google Home. Sharing access was also somewhat limited. You can create a keycode and send it to someone, but those keycodes can't be time constrained. To create a time constrained keycode, you need to send it through the app. This means the recipient must have a Nest account and app. We also had many problems with this system, as the app often gave us an error message when trying to generate a passcode for the recipient. When this system did work, the activity log was accurate.

Both the August Smart and the Kwikset Kevo provide similar smart functionality, and both shared a score of 4 out of 10 in this metric. Both require a seperate smart hub in order to access their smart features. Neither of these models have keypads, so you must open the app on your phone, essentially turning it into a Bluetooth Key, in order to unlock the lock. This means sharing access requires others to create an account and download an app. This function worked well for both locks in our experience, and the corresponding activity locks were accurate. Annoyingly, both locks also had delays when using a phone to open them. Once the app was open while in Bluetooth range we usually had to tap the locks multiple times before the lock actually opened. In both cases we far preferred using a physical key to open the locks to using a phone. The August is compatible with Alexa and Google Home, while the Kwikset only works with Alexa.

In our opinion  the best smart feature on a lock is an old fashioned keypad  like those on the Schlage models.
In our opinion, the best smart feature on a lock is an old fashioned keypad, like those on the Schlage models.

The worst scorer in our smart feature testing was the Schlage Z-Wave Connect Camelot, which earned only a 2 out of 10. It requires purchasing an additional hub in order to use smart features, and we found those features to be lackluster at best. It is only compatible with Alexa and Z-Wave smart home platforms. You can only share access with people via email, and you can't set any time constraints on that access. This makes the Camelot functionally equivalent to texting people the key code to a 'dumb' keypad lock. The only advantage is that you do get an activity log, and the ability to check on the lock remotely.

When the keyless entry systemt of the Kwikset Kevo works it's great. Unfortunately  it malfunctioned quite a bit in our testing.
When the keyless entry systemt of the Kwikset Kevo works it's great. Unfortunately, it malfunctioned quite a bit in our testing.

Keyless Entry


Introducing new technology into something you likely use multiple times per day can either make life easier, or harder. We evaluated how well each of our locks meshed into the daily routine of locking and unlocking doors in order to make sure you're not creating 2 new problems in order to solve one (trust us, in some instances that is the case). Thus keyless entry testing focused on how easily each lock granted access to its main user. We're talking when walking to the door with an armful of groceries, it is easier to use the smart lock, or will you wish you just had a key?


The Schlage Sense was the best performer in this category, earning an 8 out of 10. Were generally able to open the lock via the app when we within 30 feet of the door, or could pick up the house's WiFi network. This meant we could usually unlock the door from the car, before grabbing two big handfuls of groceries. Generally opening the lock with the app took less than 10 seconds. We only encountered a couple of glitchy moments where it took longer than that. It was also quite easy to type in an access code if we didn't want to deal with using a phone. Finally, you could still use an old fashioned key if all else fails.

Keypad models  like the Schlage Camelot pictured above  provide the most convenient keyless entry for most situations. Just punch in a code  no phone fumbling required.
Keypad models, like the Schlage Camelot pictured above, provide the most convenient keyless entry for most situations. Just punch in a code, no phone fumbling required.

The Nest x Yale occupies the second step on our user keyless entry podium with a score of 7 out of 10. It performed very similarly to the Schlage Sense, offering easy unlocking when in Bluetooth range, and keypad functionality if you don't want to fumble with your phone. The only downside is it doesn't have a physical key option. This isn't a huge deal, but keeping a key in your glove box in case the smart lock malfunctions or runs out of battery is a nice fallback.

What About Geofencing?
Many models offer a geofencing feature that automatically unlocks the door when your cell phone gets within a set distance of your phone. While this is convenient, we've come across many user reviews mentioning this technology malfunctioning and unlocking the door while the occupants are home or even in bed. Therefore, if you choose to use this feature, we suggest you do so with caution.

The Schlage Z-Wave Connected Camelot functions the same as its sibling, the Schlage Sense, meaning you can easily get access via the app, a key code, or a physical key. However, when trying to open the lock via Bluetooth we did run into some false starts where we needed to restart the app before the door actually unlocked, so we gave it a slightly lower score of 6 out of 10.

The Nest x Yale's keypad offers easy user entry for teh owner of the lock  though we did run into issues when sharing keycodes with others.
The Nest x Yale's keypad offers easy user entry for teh owner of the lock, though we did run into issues when sharing keycodes with others.

The August Pro + Connect is the first of the models that we would consider annoying to use, earning it a score of 5 out of 10. It has no keypad, so if you want to ditch the key you'll have to unlock using the app via Bluetooth. In our experience this tended not to work on the first attempt, requiring multiple, sometimes frustrated tapping on our smartphone screens. On average, it would take 20 seconds of more to unlock the August Pro using the app. Luckily you still have the option of using a key.

The August Smart fell one step below its sibling with a score of 4 out of 10. It shares the same frustrations with a slow and unreliable Bluetooth unlocking process, but it tended to take a little longer to actually unlock than even the August Pro. Again, luckily, you can default to using an actual key if need be.

The August models we tested generally opened quickly when we sed our phones as Bluetooth keys  but we did run into some glitches.
The August models we tested generally opened quickly when we sed our phones as Bluetooth keys, but we did run into some glitches.

The Kwikset Kevo was our least favorite lock to use, earning it a score of 3 out of 10. The lack of a keypad forces you to use Bluetooth to unlock it, which involves opening the app while within Bluetooth range, and then tapping the lock with your finger. At least that's what it's supposed to involve. In our testing it actually involved opening the app, tapping the lock a few times, then putting the phone right next to the lock, tapping it a few more times, cursing into the ether, tapping a few more times, and then finally hearing the bolt unlock. If we weren't testing this product we would have switched to using the optional physical key after just a few uses.

The Schlage Camelot has the highest ANSI security rating of all the locks we tested.
The Schlage Camelot has the highest ANSI security rating of all the locks we tested.

Security


We assessed the security of these locks in two ways. First, we looked at the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) rating for each lock. This is a rating from 1 to 3 (1 being the best) of how secure the physical deadbolt is (for more on ANSI ratings take a look at our buying advice article). We also evaluated the efficacy of auto-locking features that will automatically lock the door, even if you forget to do so yourself.


The Schlage Z-Wave Connect Camelot led the field in our security testing with a score of 9 out of 10. It carries an ANSI grade 1 security rating, the highest possible. It also has an auto lock that engages after 30 seconds of inactivity, so you'll always 'remember' to lock the door.

Don't Lock Yourself Out
Autolock features are great, but they also make it pretty easy to lock yourself out of the house if you go to check the mail sans phone (keypad models do give you another out if this happens). We also found that most models will engage the deadbolt, even if the door is open. So if you've left the door open for a while, you'll want to make sure the deadbolt isn't engaged lest you smash the door frame.

The Nest x Yale was next up in our security testing, earning a score of 7 out of 10. Its ANSI rating is grade 2, and you can set a custom auto lock delay. This means you can set a longer delay if you tend to pop outside to grab the mail without your phone, and don't want to get yourself locked out.

Both August models simply control you're existing deadbolt  so if you already have a high security deadbolt you still get to enjoy its benefits.
Both August models simply control you're existing deadbolt, so if you already have a high security deadbolt you still get to enjoy its benefits.

Most of the models we tested fell into the average bucket, all earning scores of 5 out of 10 in our security testing. The Schlage Sense has an ANSI grade 3 rating (low, but likely secure enough) and does have an auto locking feature. Both the August Pro + Connect and the August Smart do not have ANSI ratings as they install onto an existing deadbolt. They both also have auto lock features that work well.

The Kwikset Kevo was the lowest scorer in this metric, picking up a 4 out of 10. It is ANSI grade 2 and has no auto locking features, which doesn't compliment its finicky touch controls very well.

Installing all of our locks in our super secure smart door.
Installing all of our locks in our super secure smart door.

Installation


We scored ease of installation based both on how difficult it is to physically install each lock into a door, and how arduous it is the get the lock talking to a smart hub, and in turn talking to your phone. While some of these locks are certainly more difficult to install than others, the differences aren't huge. Therefore we wouldn't let a lower installation score dissuade you unless the phrase 'DIY' makes you shudder.


We found the Nest x Yale to be the easiest lock to install, earning it the top score of 9 out of 10. Installation is basically the same as installing any deadbolt. Nest has been in the smart home game for a while, and it shows. Connecting the lock to the Nest smart hub and syncing it with the corresponding app is quick and easy.

The Nest x Yale is quite easy to install.
The Nest x Yale is quite easy to install.

Both August models we tested, the Pro + Connect and the Smart, scored 8 out of 10 in this metric. Both locks mount onto an existing deadbolt, so you won't have to fuss with the actual bolt at all. Just remove a couple screws to take the thumb latch off, screw on the August baseplate, and slide the lock on, simple as that. We also had very little trouble syncing the locks with smart hubs.

Both August models just sit on top of an existing deadbolt  making installation very easy.
Both August models just sit on top of an existing deadbolt, making installation very easy.

The Schlage Sense, our favorite overall lock, was only mediocre in our installation testing, earning a 6 out of 10. The Sense has slightly less wiggle room when it comes to installation. Most people will likely be able to pop it right in, but there is more of a chance you might need to move things around and maybe drill some new holes. App setup was relatively painless, and the included smart hub set up quite easily.

We found the installation process for the Kwikset Kevo to be somewhat slow and complicated.
We found the installation process for the Kwikset Kevo to be somewhat slow and complicated.

The lowest scorers in this metric where the Schlage Z-Wave Connect Camelot and the Kwikset Kevo, both of which earned a 5 out of 10. The Z-Wave Connect Camelot share some of the physical installation difficulties of its sibling, but also didn't talk to the smart hub as easily. We had to restart the app a couple of times before initial installation worked. The Kwikset Kevo gave us similar app setup issues, and the lock itself was quite finicky, taking us a full 25 minutes to get it seated correctly.

Conclusion


In our humble opinion, smart locks are not quite ready for prime time. The technology is still clunky enough that we wouldn't suggest it to most home owners. In fact, in most cases a 'dumb' keypad lock will get you most of the functionality at a fraction of the cost. However, if you have a rotating cast of dog walkers, own multiple vacation rentals, or just often need to let people into your home when you're not there, some of these locks may make your life a bit easier. We hope our testing results have given you a clear picture of the current smart lock selection, and elucidated whether any of these models might be a worthy addition for your home.


Max Mutter and Steven Tata