Reviews You Can Rely On

Best Smart Plug of 2021

We tested the top models from TP-Link, WeMo, iDevices, and others to determine the best smart plugs for your needs
We found it relatively easy to set up the Amazon Smart Plug.
Credit: Jason Peters
By Max Mutter and Michelle Powell  ⋅  Jul 26, 2021
Our Editors independently research, test, and rate the best products. We only make money if you purchase a product through our links, and we never accept free products from manufacturers. Learn more
We researched over 50 of the most promising smart plugs in our quest to find the best. We purchased the top 9 for some hands-on, side-by-side testing. After using each one of these plugs on a daily basis for lamps, fans, entertainment systems, and heated dog beds (yes, our pets are spoiled) we found some surprising results and ultimately would only recommend seven of the nine that we tested. Through this process, we discovered how easy each model is to set up, how intuitive their associated apps are, and how easily each bounces back from a WiFi or power outage. From those that just want to be able to turn a lamp on before they get out of bed, to those looking to build a sophisticated smart home, this review has you covered.

Top 9 Product Ratings

Displaying 1 - 5 of 9
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Awards Editors' Choice Award Editors' Choice Award   Top Pick Award 
Price $60 List$35 List
$23.99 at Amazon
$80 List$35 List$45 List
$19.99 at Amazon
Overall Score Sort Icon
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Pros Quick setup, intuitive app, reliable and responsive, energy monitoring, 2 independent portsQuick setup, broad smart home compatibility, inexpensiveWeatherproof, 2 outlets in 1, broad smart home support, energy usage monitoringSmall size doesn't block other outlets, fairly straightforward interface2 independent outlets, weatherproof, individual run time monitoring
Cons No Apple HomeKit or IFTTT support, can be a bit priceyHard to change networks, slower recovery when WiFi cuts outSomewhat confusing to connect to virtual assistantsLacks any advanced featuresSetup relatively involved, slow to reboot after WiFi outage
Bottom Line Fully featured, reliable, and useful in any home, this is our overall favorite modelBasic functionality in a reliable and inexpensive packageIntuitive functionality in a weatherproof packageA good option for crowded outlets with large plugsA great option to individually control two outdoor appliances
Rating Categories Currant WiFi Outlet WeMo Mini iDevices Outdoor Sw... Leviton Smart Wi-Fi... TP-Link Kasa Outdoor
Ease Of Setup (40%)
8.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
5.0
Reliability (30%)
9.0
9.0
7.0
7.0
7.0
Interface (15%)
8.0
7.0
8.0
6.0
8.0
Voice Assistants (15%)
4.0
9.0
8.0
8.0
8.0
Specs Currant WiFi Outlet WeMo Mini iDevices Outdoor Sw... Leviton Smart Wi-Fi... TP-Link Kasa Outdoor
Number of Outlets 2 1 2 1 2
Maximum Power 1.8kW 1.8 kW 1.2 kW 1.5kW 1.875kW
Smart Home Compatability Alexa, Google Home Alexa, Apple HomeKit, Google Home, IFTTT, Nest Alexa, Apple HomeKit, Google Home, IFTTT Alexa, Google Home IFTTT, Nest, August Alexa, Google Home IFTTT, Nest, Home and Away
Warranty 1 Year Limited 3 Year Limited 1 Year Limited 5 Year Limited 2 Year Limited


Best Overall Smart Plug


Currant WiFi Outlet


77
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Ease of Setup 8
  • Reliability 9
  • Interface 8
  • Voice Assistants 4
Number of Outlets: 2 | Smart Support: Alexa, Google Assistant
Quick setup
Intuitive app
Reliable and responsive
Energy monitoring
Two independent ports
No Apple HomeKit or IFTTT support
Somewhat pricey

Of all the plugs we tested, the Currant WiFi offers the most seamless user experience. This plug proved to be one of the most reliable, and it was quick to get back to work after internet outages. The associated app allows you to make an account or log in using your Facebook account, and there is a quick-start option to connect to Alexa. The outlets are placed on the side of the device, making it easier to slip behind a desk or couch, and the orientation of the outlets can be flipped, providing even more adaptability to your space. Finally, this plug's advanced features include measuring power usage and managing that usage with power-saving modes, which means your electricity bill may also become a bit more bearable.

The biggest shortcoming of the Currant is its lack of compatibility with Apple Home and If This Then That (IFTTT). While most smart homes are likely using Alexa or Google Assistant, which the Currant is compatible with, IFTTT is increasingly popular, so not being able to experiment with it is a downside. Additionally, this device's list price is fairly high, though consumers can often find it online for less. Still, if you primarily want to set schedules for lights, track energy usage, and turn on appliances by talking to Alexa or Google, this device will do all that and more, all in a simple and user-friendly package.

Read review: Currant WiFi

Best Basic Smart Plug


WeMo Mini


75
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Ease of Setup 6
  • Reliability 9
  • Interface 7
  • Voice Assistants 9
Number of Outlets: 1 | Smart Home Support: Alexa, Google Assistant, Apple Home, IFTTT
Quick setup
Broad smart home compatibility
Inexpensive
Hard to change networks
Slow recovery when WiFi cuts out

If your aim is to find a smart plug to perform basic operations like turning a lamp on or off or shutting off a fan from the comfort of your bed, check out the WeMo Mini. It performs these tasks well, is intuitive to get up and running, and won't empty your wallet in the process. Unlike most plugs, it doesn't require creating an account to get started; simply download the app, scan the QR code, and ask Alexa to "discover devices." From there, you can set schedules and control devices directly from your phone or via a virtual assistant. The WeMo is compatible with all Amazon, Google, Apple, and IFTTT smart home platforms.

While the Mini offers all the basic functionality you could want from a plug for an enticingly low price, it doesn't rebound or adapt well. Switching the plug to a new WiFi network requires a reset that was much more involved than the initial setup, making it a poor choice for those who frequently switch apartments and/or WiFi routers. It was also slower than most other devices in reconnecting after a WiFi outage. However, as long as you don't experience too many WiFi outages or don't mind being a bit patient when you do, the WeMo Mini offers a great user experience for a relatively low price.

Read review: WeMo Mini

Best Bang for the Buck for Alexa Users


Amazon Smart Plug


57
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Ease of Setup 6
  • Reliability 6
  • Interface 3
  • Voice Assistants 7
Number of Outlets: 1 | Smart Home Support: Alexa
Simple setup/use for Alexa users
Relatively inexpensive
Limited smart home compatibility
Only one outlet

If your burgeoning smart home is centered around Alexa, the Amazon Smart Plug is one of the easiest and most economical ways to expand its purview. For those who already have an Alexa account and the corresponding app installed on their phone, this simple plug is a cinch to set up and use. It is relatively simple to use the same app to set schedules and adjust settings. Alexa Routines can be employed to have the plug interact with your other smart devices, such as turn on a lamp when your Alexa-enabled security camera senses motion. And, of course, it works seamlessly with Alexa voice controls.

This plug is fairly basic, so it doesn't offer advanced features like energy usage monitoring. It also lacks broader smart home compatibility, with IFTTT possibly the most notable exclusion. Despite these minor drawbacks, this plug is an excellent way to expand the abilities of your Alexa ecosystem.

Read review: Amazon Smart Plug

Best Runtime Tracking on a Budget


TP-Link Kasa WiFi Lite


65
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Ease of Setup 5
  • Reliability 7
  • Interface 8
  • Voice Assistants 8
Number of Outlets: 1 | Smart Home Support: Alexa, Google Home IFTTT, Nest, Home and Away
Inexpensive
Runtime tracking
Compact
Setup can be less than streamlined
Can be slower to recover from WiFi outages

Measuring how often you use a certain high-energy appliance is often the first step in reducing your electricity usage. If you mostly want a plug to track how often you use a certain appliance or to confront how much time you actually spend laying on the couch watching TV, the TP-Link Kasa WiFi Lite is a simple, low-cost option. This slim plug can fit behind most furniture and allows you to get instant runtime statistics on your phone for less than most of the competition.

To unlock the TP-Link Kasa WiFi Lite's cheap runtime tracking, you'll have to contend with a slightly more involved setup process (usually involving multiple apps and accounts to link the plug to a virtual assistant), as well as a slight delay in recovering from WiFi outages. However, these annoyances are relatively minor and don't diminish the usefulness of the plug's runtime tracking features.

Read review: TP-Link Kasa WiFi Lite

Best Smart Powerstrip


TP-Link Kasa Smart WiFi Power Strip


65
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Ease of Setup 5
  • Reliability 7
  • Interface 8
  • Voice Assistants 8
Number of Outlets: 6 (+3 USB) | Smart Home Support: Alexa, Google Assistant, IFTTT
6 independent outlets
Surge protection
Individual runtime monitoring
Setup relatively involved
Slower reboot after WiFi outage

Home entertainment systems are some of the most notorious "energy vampires" around, with all of those TVs, soundbars, and streaming devices still drawing energy even after being powered down. Enter the TP-Link Kasa Smart WiFi Power Strip. It offers six independently controlled smart outlets, all in a surge-protecting power strip. This allows you to virtually unplug your entire entertainment system, either manually through a command on your phone or automatically by setting a schedule, eliminating that wasteful electricity usage. The strip can also monitor how long each outlet is turned on, providing insight into your energy usage habits. All of that functionality is controlled with a well-designed app that makes managing schedules/settings for up to six different devices surprisingly straightforward.

The biggest downside of such a fully-featured device is that the initial setup is more complicated. It requires you to make an account, confirm via email, and manually link to the smart home moderator of your choice. The same is true if you need to switch WiFi networks, which requires a full reboot of the device. We also found that it took the Kasa Power Strip a little longer to find its bearings after a WiFi outage than some of its competitors. Those small annoyances aside, we still feel the Kasa is the best solution for those that require multiple, independent, smart outlets in one location.

Read review: TP Link Kasa Smart WiFi Power Strip

Best for Outdoor Use


TP-Link Kasa Outdoor


65
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Ease of Setup 5
  • Reliability 7
  • Interface 8
  • Voice Assistants 8
Number of Outlets: 2 | Smart Home Support: Alexa, Google Assistant, IFTTT, Nest, Home and Away
Two independent outlets
Weatherproof
Individual runtime monitoring
Setup relatively involved

The TP-Link Kasa Outdoor, in our opinion, is your best bet for outside use. It provides a lot of functionality for a relatively low price. It offers two independently controlled outlets attached to a single plug, which allows you to have a set of deck string lights and a birdbath bubbler on separate schedules. This plug also works with almost every smart home system, allowing it to integrate seamlessly into most existing setups.

The only minor downsides of the Kasa Outdoor are that the installation process is slightly more difficult than average, and there is a small delay in rebooting after a WiFi outage. However, both of these annoyances feel trivial when considering its otherwise great performance.

Read review: TP-Link Kasa Outdoor

Compare Products

select up to 5 products to compare
Score Product Price Our Take
77
$60
Editors' Choice Award
Offers pretty much everything you could want from a connected outlet
75
$35
Editors' Choice Award
The perfect low-cost solution for connecting basic appliances to the internet
69
$80
A simple and easy way to control outdoor lights and other small electronics
66
$35
Slim and trim, can often nestle where others won't fit
65
$45
Top Pick Award
Turns a single outdoor outlet into 2 independent controlled smart sockets
65
$80
Top Pick Award
A simple and effective way to lessen the energy cost of entertainments centers, work stations, and other notorious energy vampires
65
$35
Best Buy Award
TP Link's basic outlet makes their network easily (and cheaply) expandable
57
$25
Best Buy Award
A basic and streamlined plug for Alexa controlled smart homes
57
$27
Offers a long list of features but lacks Google Assistant, Siri, and IFTTT support

Why You Should Trust Us


Authors Michelle Powell and Max Mutter have been using, testing, and writing about smart home devices for more than 4 years. In that time, they've purchased and conducted hands-on testing of more than 100 devices. At any given time, Max and Michelle have a dozen smart home apps on their phones controlling even more smart locks, WiFi thermostats, security cameras, and robot vacuums. This full and long-term immersion into the world of connected home devices gives them significant insight into the usefulness and overall performance of the plugs currently on the market.

For this review, we spent weeks throwing a series of challenges at these plugs. We controlled them with Alexa, Google, and Siri and used them in conjunction with If This Then That applets. We also installed their accompanying apps on both Android and iOS devices. We cut off their power supply and shut off the WiFi. Upon turning everything back on, we timed how long it took each plug to reorient itself and noted if user input was required to recapture functionality. We also spent some time living with each plug, creating schedules for turning lights on and off and using them to summon our coffee makers in the morning, all to get a feel for how well these devices incorporate themselves into daily life.

Credit: Jenna Ammerman

Value


Value is always an important thing to consider, but we found that the range for smart plugs is relatively narrow. We feel that the WeMo Mini offers a great value for most people, that the Alexa Smart Plug is a great deal for Alexa users, and that the Currant WiFi Outlet provides good bang for the buck for those seeking advanced features like energy usage monitoring.

Choosing the Right Smart Plug


Though virtual assistants like Alexa and Siri have been ubiquitous for nearly a decade now, leveraging that technology into anything more than inquiring about the weather or asking how old George Clooney is has been a relatively slow evolution. Enter the smart plug. These simple, WiFi-enabled devices fit into standard wall sockets, essentially linking any appliance that gets plugged into the wall to the limitless possibilities of the internet. You can turn things on and off via your phone or by yelling commands at your favorite virtual assistant. You can set schedules for individual appliances and even have a fan automatically turn on when it gets to a certain temperature (or when it's George Clooney's birthday if you really want to).

Credit: Jenna Ammerman

Why Get a Smart Plug?


The possible uses for smart plugs are seemingly infinite, so we'll just list a few of the most common to help you figure out if purchasing one might make some small aspect of your life a bit better/easier.

The WeMo Mini is very excited about adding connected functionality...
The WeMo Mini is very excited about adding connected functionality to your home devices.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

Remotely Summon Appliances


Here, we have in mind functions like turning on a space heater before leaving the cocoon of your comforter, turning on lights before entering a dark house, or turning lights off before starting a movie without leaving the couch. You could even use one to turn on a coffee maker or kettle to get your morning drink brewing before you get out of bed. Many people also use a smart plug to start their slow cooker recipe midday, ensuring it's hot and ready when they get home.

The TP-Link Kasa Lite is a great option for expanding your TP-Link...
The TP-Link Kasa Lite is a great option for expanding your TP-Link smart network.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

Editors' note: You should always be careful when putting devices on autonomous schedules. While things like space heaters are often compatible with smart plugs, leaving one on a schedule could mean inadvertently having it turn on unattended, presenting a potential hazard.

Security


It's an old trick to put a few lamps on a timer so that they turn on and make it look like you're home even when you're on vacation. However, we all remember the scene in Home Alone when the burglars identify the empty house based on the lights turning on at the same time every night. Many of these plugs have 'away' modes that will turn lights on and off in a slightly more randomized, natural feeling pattern, ensuring that Joe Pesci won't steal your jewelry. Some can even adjust based on the local sunset time for a more organic pattern.

TP-Link makes it easy to set schedules based on the local sunrise/set.
TP-Link makes it easy to set schedules based on the local sunrise/set.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

Energy Savings


Many home gadgets and appliances, including many TVs, computers, and kitchen devices, still draw non-trivial amounts of power when plugged in but not in use. Smart plugs help you get around this issue. These devices not only let you completely turn off appliances from your phone, but you can also put them on schedules, ensuring your devices won't be needlessly using power while you're not at home.

The Leviton app provides a simple and clean interface.
The Leviton app provides a simple and clean interface.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

Energy Monitoring


Beyond saving energy by cutting power, some of these models can measure exactly how much power each one of your appliances is using. That kind of data is a powerful tool that can inform some behavior changes that could have a big impact on your electric bill.

Currant offers 2 independent outlets in one, along with energy usage...
Currant offers 2 independent outlets in one, along with energy usage monitoring.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

Policing Childrens' Technology Use


Some plugs let you set time usage limitations, automatically turning off a TV or video game after it's been turned on for more than 2 hours in a 24 hour period. Even if a plug doesn't offer such a feature, it will likely offer scheduling features that would allow you to set the TV or video game to only be usable during certain hours of the day. You just have to make sure your kids don't figure out how to unplug the smart plug and plug their device directly back into the wall.

Considerations for Picking a Smart Plug


The good news is that we've yet to find a truly terrible plug; therefore, it's unlikely you'll end up with a completely unusable device. In fact, if you already have a smart plug that you at least like and are looking to buy another one, we'd usually recommend sticking with the same company just so all of your plugs can easily live within the same app. However, if you're searching for specific advanced features, like energy usage monitoring, or are seeking compatibility with a specific virtual assistant or smart home ecosystem, you're going to want to pay attention to the specifics.

The TP-Link Kasa Power Strip is the best 2+ outlet option we&#039;ve found.
The TP-Link Kasa Power Strip is the best 2+ outlet option we've found.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

Does it need a hub?


This review focuses on WiFi-enabled plugs — devices that 'talk' directly with your home's WiFi. These types of products are by far the simplest and, for most people, can make their homes smarter with the least amount of hassle. Some plugs require a smart hub to function — essentially a separate device that acts as an intermediary between the plug(s) and the internet connection. The most popular hubs are Zigbee and Z-Wave. Apple HomeKit requires a hub of sorts, as you'll need an Apple TV, HomePod, or iPad to access HomeKit devices remotely. If you already have a smart device that uses a hub, it may make sense to get a plug that links to that hub. However, if you're just getting into the smart home game or your current smart devices don't require a hub, we'd suggest going with a plug that connects directly to your WiFi. It keeps things a bit simpler and doesn't tether you to a specific system if your smart home needs or tastes change in the future.

You can control all 6 of the TP-Link Power Strip&#039;s outlets...
You can control all 6 of the TP-Link Power Strip's outlets independently.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

Smart Home/Virtual Assistant Compatibility


One of the most useful things a smart plug can do is enable a wide array of voice commands for different appliances. This requires the support of a virtual assistant like Alexa, Siri, or Google Home. No matter which assistant you currently use or are planning on using in your home, you'll want to make sure whatever model you choose is compatible. For the most part, support for Alexa and Google Home is almost universal, while Siri (Apple HomeKit) users will have to be much pickier in the models they choose.

It&#039;s farily easy to link any of the outlets we tested to an Alexa...
It's farily easy to link any of the outlets we tested to an Alexa enabled device.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

If you are hoping to create more sophisticated automated triggers, like having your lights turn on when you pull into the driveway, you'll want to make sure the plug you choose can work with IFTTT (If This Then That). Though not the easiest platform to use, IFTTT allows you to create protocols or 'applets' across devices and services. So you can do things like create an applet that says, "If my phone's location services say I'm in the driveway, then turn on the plug connected to my lamp," or, "If the Weather Channel app says it's hotter than 75˚, turn on the plug controlling my fan."

Energy Monitoring, Scenes, and Other Abilities


Pretty much every plug on the market will allow you to control devices remotely and to set schedules for them, but there are some advanced features you may want to look out for. Energy monitoring can tell you how much power your appliances are using. Some plugs that don't offer this can monitor runtime, which is less precise but can still help confront your energy usage. Many plugs offer scenes, which is a fancy way of saying you can program a setting that, at the push of a button or voice command, controls multiple devices at once. For example, you could program a 'leaving' scene, say, "Alexa, I'm leaving," as you walk out the door, and have all of your plugs turn off.

Credit: Jenna Ammerman

Maximum Power


For most devices, like TVs, lamps, and fans, you won't need to worry about maximum power thresholds. If you want to use a smart plug with a more power-hungry device, however, you'll want to make sure that plug can handle the load. These devices may include air conditioning units, refrigerators, or toaster ovens. Most plugs have a maximum power of 1.8 kW, but some go as low as 1.2 kW. You'll want to make sure the peak power of whatever appliance you're using doesn't exceed your smart plug's limitations.


iDevices offers a simple outlet rated for outdoor use.
iDevices offers a simple outlet rated for outdoor use.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

Orientation


It may not seem it, but the extra inch (or more) that a smart plug adds to your outlet is fairly significant. If you then must plug an appliance into the front of said plug, it may preclude you from using outlets that are hidden behind couches or other furniture. Some plugs get around this problem by placing the outlet on the side of the device, resulting in a much slimmer overall profile.

The Leviton keeps the second outlet completely clear, allowing for...
The Leviton keeps the second outlet completely clear, allowing for even large appliances to be plugged in directly adjacent.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

Physical vs. Electrical Switches


This isn't a consideration for smart plugs, but the appliance you want to use them with. If the appliance has a physical on/off switch, then you're good to go as you can leave the switch in the on position and then control it remotely with your smart plug. If the appliance just has a power button, or worse, a touchscreen-type power control, you may be out of luck. This could indicate an electrical switch, which just registers the first button press as power on, then the opposite for every consecutive press. In that case, you could cut power to the device with a smart plug, and then when you turn the plug back on, the device will just power up into standby mode and not turn on. The best way to test if your device has an electrical switch is to turn it on, unplug it, then plug it back in. If it screams back to life upon being plugged back in, you're in luck! If it doesn't, it likely has an electrical switch that will make using the device with a smart plug problematic.

A plug with the outlet on the front &amp;#40;like the TP-Link Kasa Lite...
A plug with the outlet on the front (like the TP-Link Kasa Lite pictured here) creates a larger profile that may not fit behind a couch or other furniture.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

Setup and Rebooting Time


Two areas where we found plugs to display noticeable differences were their setup processes and their ability to recover from a spontaneous internet or power outage. Some models require that you download an app, create a new account and confirm it via email, and then re-sign into that account within the corresponding virtual assistant app of your choice. Others offer much quicker processes, where you can just sign in using an existing account (like Facebook or Google) and then have your other smart devices discover the plug without dealing with any additional apps.


Similarly, we found that some models can spring right back to attention after a WiFi or power outage, while other models take a few minutes or even longer to find their bearings again. And some others often require some sort of manual reboot after losing the WiFi connection. Our top picks perform well in this regard, all dealing with losses of connection without missing a beat.

Credit: Jenna Ammerman

Conclusion


Smart plugs are both the easiest and cheapest way to add some connected functionality to your current appliances and devices. Whether you want to turn on your slow cooker remotely while at work, set your lights on a schedule, or even have your fans and space heaters react to the weather outside, the right plug can make it happen. We hope this article has helped you decide if you want to start peppering your outlets with smart plugs and, if so, which ones you want.

Max Mutter and Michelle Powell