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Best Robot Vacuum of 2020

Tuesday September 15, 2020
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Looking for a robot vacuum? We've bought and tested over 25 models in the last 5 years. In this 2020 update, we test the best 8 you can buy today. We ran each vacuum through a gauntlet of tests to see how effectively they cleaned a room, navigated obstacles, and picked up dirt, dust, and debris. Almost all of these models are internet-connected and we assess each smart feature as well. Read on as we describe which vacuums clean effectively and are hassle-free and which ones involve constant babysitting with snags and jams.

Top 8 Product Ratings

Displaying 1 - 5 of 8
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Best of the Best for Most People


iRobot Roomba i7+ with Clean Base Automatic Dirt Disposal


Editors' Choice Award
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$789.99
at Amazon
See It

70
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Navigation 8
  • Home Coverage 8
  • Carpet Cleaning 7
  • Hard Surface Cleaning 7
  • Pet Hair 2
  • Smart Connect 7
Multi-Room Navigation: Yes | Smart Capabilities: Yes
Exceptional navigational skills
Solid cleaning performance
Extremely convenient to use
Abysmal at cleaning up pet hair

If you are looking for an all-around high-performing robot vacuum, it's hard to go wrong with the Roomba i7+ with Clean Base Automatic Dirt Disposal. This robot thoroughly impressed us with its navigational skills, cleaning even the most cluttered areas with relative ease and seldom requiring intervention to free it from a tricky corner. It also did a great job cleaning up all sorts of messes on hard floors, and low and high pile carpet alike. This little robot is full of smart features, allowing you to direct it remotely and integrate it into your existing smart home system. The automatic dirt disposal base also means you only have to clean out the dustbin after 30 or so cleaning passes making it even more convenient.

One noticeable drawback is that this robot vacuum did a poor job in our pet hair test. It barely collected any of the pet hair we spread out on either the low-pile or medium-pile carpet. The vast majority of the hair collected was tangled up in the extractor head, rather than making it into the collection bin. Regardless, this is still one of our favorite robot vacuums, and it would make a great addition to any pet-free household.

Read Review: Roomba i7+ with Clean Base Automatic Dirt Disposal

Best All-Around Vacuum


Neato Botvac D7 Connected


Editors' Choice Award
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$599.99
at Amazon
See It

69
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Navigation 6
  • Home Coverage 7
  • Carpet Cleaning 8
  • Hard Surface Cleaning 8
  • Pet Hair 6
  • Smart Connect 7
Multi-Room Navigation: Yes | Smart Capabilities: Yes
Exceptional cleaning abilities on hard and soft floors
Reliable at cleaning up pet hair
Allows you to draw virtual barriers
Not the most competent navigator in cramped areas

The Neato line's newest flagship model, the Botvac D7 Connected, delivered an overall fantastic performance, especially in our cleaning tests. This smart vacuum creates maps of your home after it cleans, allowing you to track its progress and draw virtual walls to delineate areas in which you don't want the robot to venture. It does an excellent job of cleaning most types of messes on both hard and soft floors and even does well at collecting pet hair.

The Neato D7 isn't without its flaws. It wasn't able to easily escape from some of the more cramped areas in our navigation tests, and is a little less gentle on your furniture than other models, especially when backing up. The app does have a "gentle navigation" mode if this becomes a problem, but we didn't notice a huge difference in gentleness when engaged. The D7's top-tier performance also comes at a higher price and is one of the more expensive models of the group. It is still one of our all-time favorite robot vacuums we have tested to date, and we would highly recommend it.

Read Review: Neato Botvac D7 Connected

Best Navigational Abilities


Roborock S5


Editors' Choice Award
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$549.00
(9% off)
at Amazon
See It

69
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Navigation 10
  • Home Coverage 8
  • Carpet Cleaning 5
  • Hard Surface Cleaning 4
  • Pet Hair 2
  • Smart Connect 7
Multi-Room Navigation: Yes | Smart Capabilities: Yes
Handles cluttered rooms with ease
Quickly covers the majority of your home when cleaning
Lots of smart home functionality
Didn't do fantastic at cleaning hard or soft floors
Struggled to pick up pet hair

With similar overall performance as the D7, the Roborock S5 distinguished itself by being the group's best navigator. This robot quickly maneuvered in and out of the most confined areas around various furniture types, never once getting stuck or requiring assistance to be freed in our tests. It covers the most significant percentage of your home compared to all the other products we tested, never omitting an area if it could physically fit there. It also has an impressive set of smart features.

However, the Roborock doesn't come close to matching the cleaning abilities of the Neato Botvac D7, struggling to pick up pet hair and other caked-on messes. While it doesn't top the charts for cleaning power, this robot excels at making its way through a cluttered and cramped home, boldly cleaning where other robots fear to tread.

Read Review: Roborock S5

Best Bang for the Buck


Neato Botvac D4 Connected


Best Buy Award
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$329.99
(23% off)
at Amazon
See It

65
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Navigation 6
  • Home Coverage 7
  • Carpet Cleaning 7
  • Hard Surface Cleaning 6
  • Pet Hair 6
  • Smart Connect 7
Multi-Room Navigation: Yes | Smart Capabilities: No
Fantastic value
Solid smart features
Great cleaning performance
Not the most graceful navigator
No side brush

If the cost of the top-tier robots is outside your budget, then the Neato Botvac D4 Connected is a worthy contender. It's our favorite model in its price range and performs comparably to some of the overall top robots in certain scenarios. This vacuum navigates obstacles exceptionally well and does a good job cleaning most of your home, picking up all sorts of messes from both carpets and hard floors. It even does a reasonably good job collecting dog and cat hair and has a respectable number of smart features and functions, all while retailing at a fraction of the price of the premium products.

However, the Neato D4 does encounter some difficulties when trying to clean confined or cluttered areas, skipping some spots entirely if it detects too many obstacles. It also isn't exactly gentle when driving around your furniture. It repeatedly backed into items in our test course or jostled them as it tried to find a suitable route. The most this would ever amount to is some light scrapes and scuffs, but it might be something to consider if you have particularly delicate or antique furniture items in your home. This robot also didn't do quite as well when it came to cleaning performance as the top models, especially on hard floors. However, the D4 is our top recommended option if you are looking to save some cash but still want one of the best 'bots around.

Read Review: Neato Botvac D4 Connected

Best on a Tight Budget


Ecovacs Deebot N79S


Best Buy Award
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$199.99
(20% off)
at Amazon
See It

46
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Navigation 6
  • Home Coverage 4
  • Carpet Cleaning 4
  • Hard Surface Cleaning 4
  • Pet Hair 2
  • Smart Connect 6
Multi-Room Navigation: Yes | Smart Capabilities: Yes
Inexpensive
Does a decent job at navigating
Mediocre at cleaning carpets
Below average at cleaning hard floors

If the Botvac D4 is still outside your budget and you really want to have a new robot vacuum, you should consider the Ecovacs Deebot N79S. It does a decent job of navigating a house and has a good set of smart features. It isn't the best when it comes to cleaning performance, but it will clean up most small messes without too much of a fuss. Its main selling point is that it costs considerably less than the top products.

Unfortunately, the Deebot N79S didn't deliver the most impressive cleaning performance. It struggled with cleaning caked-on or complicated messes, notably with things like pet hair and flour. It also isn't the best at cleaning larger areas or multiple rooms. While the N79S is far from the best robot we have seen, it's a great option if you only need something to clean a single room or for light-duty work and want to spend as little as possible.

Read Review: Ecovacs Deebot N79S

Best for Pet Hair


iRobot Roomba s9


The iRobot Roomba s9.
Top Pick Award
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$899.00
at Amazon
See It

76
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Navigation 7
  • Home Coverage 8
  • Carpet Cleaning 8
  • Hard Surface Cleaning 7
  • Pet Hair 9
  • Smart Connect 7
Multi-Room Navigation: Yes | Smart Capabilities: Yes
Great cleaning abilities
Excellent home coverage
Exceptionally expensive
Navigation can be a little funky the first few times it cleans a room

While the Roomba s9 earned one of our top overall scores, and is the best of our test lineup when it comes to picking up pet hair. It also did exceptionally well at cleaning up all sorts of different messes from both hard and soft floors. It has a decent set of smart features and will usually cover the vast majority of the accessible floor area when it completes a cleaning cycle. You also can purchase an automated dirt disposal base, similar to the i7+, so you only have to empty the base every 30 or so cleaning passes. However, this adds a non-trivial extra cost to an already pricey product.

The s9 can get a little tripped up in rooms with a lot of furniture, especially its first time cleaning a room, and it doesn't come close to matching the finesse of other high-end models. The main reason we don't recommend the s9 to everyone is it borders on being prohibitively expensive, especially since it still isn't good enough to supplant a traditional vacuum, in our opinion. It's a fantastic option if you can afford it and need to pick up tons of dog hair, but we think most people will be happy with some of the other vacuums that scored only a little bit lower and cost considerably less.

Read Review: iRobot Roomba s9


Our fleet of robots  ready to go!
Our fleet of robots, ready to go!

Why You Should Trust Us


We have spent over five years testing and comparing robot vacuums, ranking and scoring the performance of all the best 'bots, and updating our review as new models are released. We bought all of the robots in this review at retail prices in an effort to remain independent and objective. Our review team is composed of Austin Palmer and David Wise . They both have extensive experience with consumer electronics, having tested and reviewed hundreds of different tech and smart home products here at TechGearLab.

We spent close to 250 hours testing these robots side-by-side, even going so far as to make simulated furniture in our test room to directly compare the home coverage of each robot with long exposure photography. We spread out controlled amounts of messes on different surfaces for our cleaning tests, then scored each robot on how much it picked up. We even got pet hair donated from a local groomer to spread out on our test carpet for our pet hair collection tests. Finally, we also rated the reliability of the network connection by seeing how many times we had to reset it throughout our testing period and compared how easy and intuitive each robot vacuum's remote interface is.

Related: How We Tested Robot Vacuums


Analysis and Test Results


We divide these tests into six metrics — Navigation, Home Coverage, Carpet Cleaning, Hard Surface Cleaning, Pet Hair, and Smart Connect — each weighted based on their overall significance to robot vacuum performance. Additionally, we consider each product's price and how that connects to its performance, for those of you shopping on a tighter budget and looking for better value options.

Related: Buying Advice for Robot Vacuums


Value


To land one of today's top-notch robot vacuums, you are going to have to spend some money. If you are shopping on a budget, our top recommendation is the Botvac D4 Connected by Neato. It offers the best value without sacrificing too much performance, doing a great job at navigating floors and cleaning up most messes, all while retailing for quite a bit less than the most expensive models. If this product is still too pricey, then the Ecovacs Deebot is your best bet if you are shopping on a tight budget and just have to have one of these products. However, there is a significant drop in performance when comparing this model to the D4 or our other award winners. If you are searching for the best of the best, you can expect to pay a decent amount, but these premium robots will do a much better job of cleaning and become stuck much less frequently.

Cleaning under low pieces of furniture is a must for an award-winning robot vacuum.
Cleaning under low pieces of furniture is a must for an award-winning robot vacuum.

Navigation


Our most important testing metric, navigation, constitutes 30% of the overall score for each product. After all, what good is a robot vacuum if it can't even find its way to the mess in the first place? The majority of each product's score for this metric is based on how it performed in our furniture navigation challenge. For this test, we set up a course full of furniture — a dining room table, four chairs, a lamp, sofa, coffee table, and a comfy armchair — to see how well each robot maneuvered and cleaned around them. We primarily focused on the robot's ability to navigate the room without assistance, rather than on how much of the room it cleaned. (Our next metric covers overall cleaning effectiveness.) Robots lost points for exceptionally erratic behaviors, such as repeatedly cleaning under a table for the bulk of the time.

The D4 can get a little tripped up in the most confined areas of a room.
The D4 can get a little tripped up in the most confined areas of a room.

We also awarded points based on how well each robot found its docking station from the same room or a different room, and how it handled high-contrast flooring (whether or not we got a false reading from the edge detection sensor).


Earning the top score overall and delivering the best performance that we have seen to date, the Roborock S5 impressed us with its nearly flawless performance in these tests. This robot easily navigated around all of our test furniture in each test trial without getting stuck.

The Xiaomi covered an impressive amount of our test room.
The Xiaomi covered an impressive amount of our test room.

This model was able to delicately maneuver in and out of the tightest spaces in our test furniture layout. Other robots were much rougher with the furniture and backed into some of it quite aggressively, whereas the Roborock would very carefully negotiate tight spots without crashing into things.

This robot also handles docking exceptionally well, quickly and accurately finding the dock when the two were in the same room. On top of that, it also delivered the best performance we have seen at locating its dock and returning home when the dock is in a different room — a much more difficult test that stumped a handful of robots. It also cleans darker carpets with ease, with the edge sensors accurately triggering in all of our tests.

Following the Roborock, the Roomba i7+ is the next highest performer for navigation. This robot handled our testing room full of furniture with ease, never getting fully stuck or being overly rough with any of the items. It took longer in some of the more cramped areas to find an escape route, while the Roborock immediately located a way out much easier.

The i7+ does an excellent job at navigating even the most crowded areas.
The i7+ does an excellent job at navigating even the most crowded areas.

However, the i7+ was also utterly unaffected by high-contrast areas in our test, cleaning the dark rug on the light carpet without issue. It can also easily find its way home to its dock, regardless of whether or not it is in the same room or a different room when commanded to return.

The Roomba 960 would occasionally make several extra passes around various furniture items and would struggle to find a clear route when surrounded by furniture. We also noticed that it is rougher on furniture than the Roborock S5, relying a bit more on the contact sensor than the vision sensor when cleaning around smaller obstacles, such as chair legs. It did very well in our docking tests, making its way straight to the charging base even when coming from a different room. However, it wouldn't drive over the border between light and dark carpeting, mistakenly thinking it was an edge or drop-off.

The Roomba s9 also didn't have any issues docking, almost always finding its base immediately. It also had no problems driving over high-contrast floors, unlike the 960. The edge detection sensor never gave us a false reading throughout our testing, only registering an edge or a drop when there actually was one.


Unfortunately, the s9 can be a little finicky when negotiating its way around furniture. Its first run in our test course was abysmal, but its performance improved quite a bit after starting over after a training run. It handled tight areas quite well but would occasionally crash into obstacles head-on — similar to the Neato robots. It also struggled to find a way out around the tightly spaced chairs in our simulated dinette set.

Of the remaining group, the Botvac D7 Connected and the Botvac D4 Connected by Neato are systematic cleaners. We were disappointed with this duo's performance in our furniture navigation challenge, as they all required some intervention to complete their cleaning cycles. These all choked up around the simulated dining room table and chairs, becoming entrapped in the tight spots. These were also exceptionally rough with furniture, even pushing some of the items around as they struggled to free themselves. However, this pair did redeem itself in the other two tests in this metric, with both models heading straight for the dock when directed to return home. They were also unaffected by the transition between light and dark floors.

The Ecovacs Deebot N79S cleaned our room pretty randomly during our tests. It can avoid immediate obstacles but doesn't make a map of its overall cleaning path. Surprisingly, it's quite adept at not getting stuck, though it may take a substantial amount of time to locate a straightforward way to free itself from tight spaces. However, we didn't find it to be particularly good at navigating back to its dock, especially when coming from another room.

Finishing at the back of the group was the Samsung POWERbot R7070. This robot suffered quite a bit in our furniture test, avoiding most of the problem areas right from the start. Despite that, it still managed to get stuck to the point of requiring assistance, and also got trapped in a seemingly endless loop the one time it did venture under the table. It also refused to cross the transition between light and dark carpet, fearing that it was the edge of a step or other drop off, but it does navigate back very quickly to its charging base when given the command.

The bright white near the top left of the photo shows that the Samsung R7070 spent quite some time there trying to get out.
The bright white near the top left of the photo shows that the Samsung R7070 spent quite some time there trying to get out.

The D7 does a good job of cleaning the majority of your home.
The D7 does a good job of cleaning the majority of your home.

Home Coverage


Following our Navigation metric, Home Coverage covers the next most important set of tests, accounting for 20% of each vacuum's overall score. For this metric, we evaluated how much floor each robot could clean, rather than just seeing how well they could navigate autonomously. We tested the size and ease of use of each robot's spot cleaning functions, as well as their abilities at cleaning multiple rooms and recharging if necessary. In our furniture test, we also considered the overall space each robot cleaned and its ability to use barriers to create a no-go zone. This function can be particularly useful in areas where the robot is likely to become trapped or suck up something it shouldn't, such as around a shoe rack or pet food bowls.


The Roborock ran away in this metric, again earning the top score, and is joined by the Roomba i7+ and Roomba s9. The Roborock repeatedly cleaned every last spot around the furniture in our test, never avoiding a location because it was too cluttered and only failing to clean areas where it was physically impossible for the robot to fit. This model also handles multi-room cleaning very well, quickly and systematically finding its way between rooms. The Roborock will also stop cleaning, return to its base to charge, and resume cleaning automatically.

Unfortunately, the Roborock doesn't include any barriers, requiring you to purchase them separately. It utilized magnetic strips as a way to signify no-go zones. These strips can be challenging to place securely and discreetly, but they are useful once installed. Finally, we evaluated the spot clean function of this product. It is only mediocre when activating it from the robot directly, doing a single pass over an area of about five and a half square feet. Still, it is excellent when using the companion app on a mobile phone.

The spot clean function through the app on the Xiaomi is our absolute favorite of the entire group.
The spot clean function through the app on the Xiaomi is our absolute favorite of the entire group.

The app allows you to create up to five cleaning zones of any size in any room that the robot has mapped. The robot will travel to each of the zones and clean them with the prescribed number of passes, ranging from one to three. The Roborock didn't pick up as much debris in a single pass as the other products did, making it quite useful to program it to complete multiple passes.

The i7+ and the s9 performed almost identically in our home coverage tests, even though we thought the i7+ had a slight edge in our previous navigation tests. This pair does a fantastic job of cleaning multiple rooms, systematically moving from one place to the next, and creating a map of your home while doing so. Both 'bots monitor their battery levels while cleaning and will pause their cleaning cycle to dock and recharge if they will run out of power. They will then automatically resume cleaning where they left off once the battery is recharged. The i7+ will even empty its dirt disposal bin into the automatic base, saving you from having to empty it daily.

Both the s9 and i7+ will do their best to clean any confined area they will physically fit into, though the s9 lacks the same finesse as the i7+. The i7+ includes a single programmable virtual barrier system for areas you don't want it to clean, such as around shoes or a pet's food and water bowls. The s9 didn't include any barrier system but is compatible with the same one as the i7+; you just have to purchase it separately. Additionally, both of these robots let you create virtual barriers and no-go zones in the app once they have mapped your home, which is more convenient than a physical barrier or virtual wall with a base station.

We were very impressed with the spot cleaning function on both the i7+ and the s9, which is comparable to the Roborock. While the spot clean initiated using the button on either Roomba is mediocre, sending the robot to clean a circular area about four feet across, the spot clean initiated from the mobile app is much more capable. You can send these robots to clean specific rooms once they have created a map of your home.


Next, the Neato Botvac D7, the D4, and the Roomba 960 all scored well. All of these robots are highly capable of cleaning multiple rooms, systematically cleaning each one before moving on to the next one. These robots will also return to their docking station to charge if their battery becomes depleted in the middle of the cleaning cycle, automatically resuming once they have recharged sufficiently.

The Roomba 960 covered slightly more ground than the Neato robots did in our single-room furniture test, nimbly cleaning around our simulated furniture.

The 960 nimbly wove its way through our simulated dining room table and chairs.
The 960 nimbly wove its way through our simulated dining room table and chairs.

The Neato D7 and D4 tend to struggle a bit more in confined areas, getting jammed up and failing to clean them. The 960 would happily venture where the Neato's would not.

However, we did like the barrier methods on the Neato D7 and D4 the best, followed by the Roomba 960. Both Neato robots rely on a physical, magnetic strip to signify no-go zones but also provide the ability to set virtual barriers in the mobile app. These can take some time to configure, requiring you to run a unique cleaning cycle and follow a series of prompts, but they are quite useful in practice.

The D7 allows you to establish no-go zones and areas in its mobile app.
The D7 allows you to establish no-go zones and areas in its mobile app.

The Roomba 960 has a virtual barrier system that can be placed on the ground. This small box can generate a virtual wall about 10 feet long, or a do not enter circle about four feet in diameter, identical to the i7+.

The Roomba's virtual wall is a quick and easy way to cordon off a room you don't want the robot to clean.
The Roomba's virtual wall is a quick and easy way to cordon off a room you don't want the robot to clean.

For our spot clean check, the Roomba 960 has a far inferior spot clean function compared to the Neato D7 and D4, only cleaning about 12 square feet. This robot would spiral out and in from the location where you initiated the spot clean and did a poor job collecting debris.

The Botvac D7 and D4 usually clean a square section that measures roughly 49 square feet with their spot cleaning modes. However, both of these robots can be set to clean a much larger area with their mobile apps, boosting the coverage to almost 170 square feet. Unfortunately, you still can't program them to perform multiple passes.

The Samsung POWERbot R7070 came next, delivering the worst performance out of any of the systematic cleaning robots in this metric. This robot somehow seems to avoid cluttered areas and can become easily trapped if it does venture into them, resulting in many areas not being cleaned while others are cleaned relentlessly. This robot also utilizes magnetic strips as barriers, without any option to set up virtual ones in the app. We also weren't enamored with the spot clean feature on this product. While it did clean a comparable area to the Botvac D4, it left a decent amount of debris behind.

However, this robot does handle cleaning multiple rooms quite well as long as they're relatively clutter-free. It also can pause cleaning to recharge and automatically resume, like the other top products.

Finishing out the back of the group for this metric is the Deebot N79S. It cleaned randomly in our tests, meaning it missed quite a few spots unless left to clean for an exceptionally long time — orders of magnitude more than the systematic cleaning robots. It can't automatically recharge and resume cleaning if the battery gets too low while in use and has a spot clean area of 12-15 square feet.

The D7 is one of the best at cleaning soft floors.
The D7 is one of the best at cleaning soft floors.

Carpet Cleaning


After all of our tests assessing how well each robot moves throughout a home, we moved on to scoring how proficient each robot is at cleaning floors, starting with carpet. We tested on both low-pile and medium-pile carpets, using flour, rice, oats, and mini-wheat cereal as our sample messes. Additionally, we also scored how closely each robot could clean against a room's walls and edges. This metric accounts for 15% of the overall score for each vacuum.


The Botvac D7, and the Roomba s9 both tied for the top spot with their superb performance at cleaning carpets. The D7 started with an excellent showing in our edge cleaning tests, cleaning within an inch of the walls, but leaving a bit more leftover mess in the corners with a small wedge of the remaining debris, about an inch and a half from the wall at its widest point.

The D7 only misses a tiny bit of debris in the corners of the pen.
The D7 only misses a tiny bit of debris in the corners of the pen.

Next, we tested out how well the D7 did at sucking up flour. We only did this test on the low-pile carpet, as expecting any of these products to collect flour from fluffier carpet is a tall order — a task much more suitable for a more powerful stick or upright vacuum. This robot picked up most of the flour, showing a clear distinction between the areas it cleaned and the ones it didn't.

The D7 delivered a phenomenal performance in collecting rice on flat and fluffier carpets, collecting the vast majority of the grains. The results were the same when it came to picking up oats. For the final test of this metric, the mini-wheat collection, the D7 faltered slightly. It usually got most of the mini-wheats, but there was always at least one that jammed up the machine or just got pushed around endlessly.

The s9 did even better than the Neato D7 at cleaning the edges of our robot test pen, only leaving a border of uncollected coffee grounds that measured about a half an inch across. The side brush doesn't do all that much at getting into the carpet piles, and it takes a little bit of time to right itself coming out of a corner. However, overall it does a very impressive job at cleaning close to walls.

The s9 also did better than the D7 at cleaning flour from the low-pile carpet, leaving only trace amounts behind. However, the D7 did slightly better at collecting rice and oats. The s9 performed similarly to the D7 at picking up rice from the flatter carpet but left quite a bit behind on the moderate-pile. The s9 also didn't pick up as many oats from the low-pile carpet as the D7, leaving behind a handful of whole oats and a noticeable amount of crumbs. The s9 did get just a few more oats than the D7 did on the fluffier carpet.

Just behind the top performers, the iRobot Roomba i7+ and the Botvac D4 Connected came next in terms of carpet cleaning prowess. The D4 began with a fantastic performance in our edge cleaning test, matching the D7. The Roomba i7+ struggled slightly more, leaving a strip of residual debris about three and a half inches wide around the edges of our test pen.

The i7+ left a decent amount of debris behind in the corners.
The i7+ left a decent amount of debris behind in the corners.

The circular design also meant that it left quite a bit more debris in the corners, with the uncleaned area measuring about five inches across at the widest point. Neither of these robots could match the performance of the D7 when it came to cleaning up a floury mess, with the D4 leaving a noticeable amount of flour behind and the i7+ leaving behind significantly more.

Both the D4 and the i7+ redeemed themselves in the rice and oat cleanup test, delivering excellent performances on both flat and fluffy carpet — although the i7+ did leave a tiny bit more leftover rice behind than we would have liked on the medium-pile. These both finished this metric with above-average showings at sucking up mini-wheats, with the D4 missing a few and the i7+ leaving only fragments behind.

Next are the Roomba 960 and the Samsung POWERbot R7070 with their reliable cleaning performance. Starting with our edge test, the 960 didn't do a fantastic job — especially compared to the R7070. However, the R7070 is the best vacuum we've seen at cleaning the corners of a room. This robot left a strip of leftover debris less than an inch wide and cleaned right into the corner, leaving virtually no residual mess.

The POWERbot R7070 delivered another reliable performance in our flour cleaning assessment, outperforming the 960, but falling short of the Neato D7. The 960 and the R7070 both did well in our rice test, collecting almost all of the debris on the flat carpet and only missing a tiny bit on the fluffier carpet. The 960 did equally well at collecting oats, while the R7070 fell flat in this test, doing very poorly on both the low-pile and medium-pile carpet. This robot pretty much did the worst of the entire group, leaving behind tons and tons of oats.

The 960 finished this metric with an excellent performance in our mini-wheat collection test, efficiently collecting them without issue. The POWERbot R7070 didn't fare quite as well, usually leaving one or two behind, regardless of whether it was on the flat or fluffy carpet.

The Roborock came next with its middle-of-the-road performance. It had a lackluster edge and corner cleaning, leaving behind plenty of mess — quite a fall from grace for this robot after its unmatched performance in the prior two metrics. The Roborock again disappointed in our flour collection test, leaving behind a noticeable amount of leftover flour.

It did redeem itself in our rice collection test, doing a great job at getting the bulk of the rice, but slid back to average performance in our oat collection test, leaving a bit more debris behind on both flat and fluffier carpets. It finished this metric with a mediocre performance at picking up larger items, missing a handful of the mini-wheats we placed on the floor.

Rounding out the back of the pack is the Ecovacs with its sub-par carpet cleaning performance. It didn't clean in very close to the edges of the room, leaving a strip of uncleaned floor at least three and a half inches wide. It also left a large wedge of mess in the corners of our testing pen, measuring over six inches at the widest point. It also delivered a below-average performance in most of our other tests — oat, mini-wheats, and flour — only doing a decent job at collecting rice.

The Samsung is one of the best at keeping hard floors sparkling.
The Samsung is one of the best at keeping hard floors sparkling.

Hard Surface Cleaning


The Hard Surface Cleaning metric accounts for 15% of the total score for each robot vacuum. We repeated the same tests as above, though this time using a section of hardwood laminate floor. Cleaning hard floors is much easier for these products than cleaning carpet, meaning that many of them scored quite a bit better.


The Neato D7 and the Samsung POWERbot earned high scores with their stellar performances on hard surfaces. These robots both did about the same in our edge test on hard floors as they did in the carpeted version, with the Neato robot leaving a little bit in each corner and the Samsung capturing practically everything, performing the best of the entire group.

The POWERbot continued its dominance in our flour collection test, collecting virtually all of the flour we laid out and outperforming all of the vacuums in the entire group. The D7 was above average, leaving some flour on the surface and failing to collect any flour that had fallen in the cracks between the boards.

The D7 got most of the surface flour but left plenty behind in the cracks.
The D7 got most of the surface flour but left plenty behind in the cracks.

Both of these models did an excellent job of collecting rice and oats, though the Samsung did leave behind three leftover oats. The Samsung did, however, an abysmal job at collecting mini-wheats, pushing them around indefinitely. The D7 fared quite a bit better but still only collected slightly less than half of the mini-wheats.

Following the top-scoring pair are the iRobot Roomba s9 and the Roomba i7+. The s9 did much better than the i7+ at cleaning along the edges of a room. However, it couldn't quite compare to the Samsung R7070, leaving behind a strip of flour about a half-inch across.


The s9 also did an excellent job of sucking up flour from the hard floor, only leaving the finest residue behind. Unfortunately, it only did a mediocre job at sucking up the oats and rice. It captured the bulk of the mess without any issue, but the brush rollers can throw some debris around when it hits a large pile of rice or oats. The rice or oats usually get thrown into the area the robot is about to clean, but it periodically throws some to the side and fails to collect them.

The s9 did manage to collect most of the mini-wheats cereal we spread out. It has plenty of clearance to roll over the cereal but wouldn't always suck it up into the collection bin.

The i7+ delivered one of the best performances for a circular robot at cleaning close to the edges of our test pen, but still left a four-inch-wide strip of residual mess. It also did an outstanding job of cleaning up flour, getting most of it on the surface, but failing to really clean into the cracks between floorboards and tracking a little bit of flour around with its wheels.

The Roomba i7+ will track fine debris around as it cleans.
The Roomba i7+ will track fine debris around as it cleans.

The i7+ did an excellent job in the next two tests, collecting all of the rice and oats with ease — outperforming the s9. Regrettably, it did fail to collect any mini-wheats, earning a low score for that final test.

The Neato D4 Connected followed next, getting of to a strong start in our edge cleaning test, but didn't do quite as well as the D7 since it lacks a rotating side brush. It also didn't do well at collecting flour, leaving behind a visible residue across the surface and failing to get any of the flour that fell between the cracks. However, it rebounded when collecting rice and oats, leaving behind only trace amounts of each. Unfortunately, it also struggled with mini-wheats, failing to collect a single one.

Next is the Roomba 960, which had a lackluster showing at cleaning hard floors. It left reasonably wide strips of residual debris in our edge test and left several brush marks behind.

The Roomba 960 also did very poorly in our flour test, leaving behind tons of residue. On the plus side, it didn't drag the flour around that much, merely leaving it be. It did redeem itself in our rice and oat collection assessments, delivering excellent performance, and collecting all of the debris we laid out. It doesn't do particularly well at collecting larger pieces of debris, pushing around all of the mini-wheats in our test indefinitely, since it lacks the clearance to pick them up successfully.

Finishing last in the group are the Ecovacs Deebot and the Roborock with their rather unsatisfactory performance when cleaning hard floors. The Roborock did better than the Deebot in our edge cleaning test, doing a reasonably good job overall and leaving a strip of leftover mess about three and a half to four inches across.

The Xiaomi handled edges a bit better with the hard floor.
The Xiaomi handled edges a bit better with the hard floor.

The Ecovacs left slightly wider strips of leftover mess. Neither of these vacuums did very well in our flour cleaning test. They both did better during rice collection. The Roborock captured almost all the rice, only leaving a few grains behind. The Ecovacs also got most of the rice but flung a bit more around than the Roborock.

Canine tester Chewie felt that the D5 could have done a slightly better job at collecting pet hair.
Canine tester Chewie felt that the D5 could have done a slightly better job at collecting pet hair.

Pet Hair


For our final evaluation of cleaning performance, we evaluated how well each vacuum gobbled up pet hair. This metric is responsible for 10% of the overall score, with some robots handling our tests far better than others.


We used pet hair kindly donated by a local groomer, then spread a measured amount out on both low-pile and medium-pile carpet. We scored each vacuum on the percentage of hair collected, and how much hair ended up in the collection bin, rather than tangled up in the brush under the machine. Picking up pet hair is somewhat tricky for these robots and is a task better suited for a more powerful upright or stick vacuum.

The Roomba s9 is the best robot vacuum we have seen so far when it comes to picking up pet hair. This vacuum collected a whopping 53% of the hair we spread out on the medium-pile carpet and 50% of the hair from the low-pile carpet. Even better, virtually all of this hair ended up in the collection bin, with little to none getting tangled around the extractor head.


The Samsung POWERbot, Neato D7, and the Neato D4 come next with their reasonable efforts. These three robot vacuums collected around 25-35% of the hair we spread out on the low-pile carpet and between 45-65% of the hair from the medium-pile carpet.

The remaining robot vacuums all scored very poorly, with the i7+, the Ecovacs, the Roomba 960, and the Roborock collecting less than half of the hair that the top vacuums collected.

The D4 has an impressive set of smart functions for being such a budget vacuum.
The D4 has an impressive set of smart functions for being such a budget vacuum.

Smart Connect


We focused our final metric on the integrated smart internet-connected features found on almost all of the robots in this review. This metric makes up 10% of the overall weighted scores. We considered the number of different smart home systems each robot could interact with, and how functional and user-friendly the companion mobile app is. We also checked if the network connection between our home WiFi and the robot was reliable throughout our testing period.


The Roborock, the Neato D7, the D4, the Roomba s9, the i7+, and the Roomba 960 all were top performers in this metric. The Roomba robots performed very well in our WiFi reliability test. We never had to reset the network or restart the app to establish a connection throughout our testing period. The Roborock did a little worse, as we occasionally had to quit the mobile app and restart it before the robot would appear as connected. The Neato D7 was very problematic, requiring multiple resets, and struggled to reliably connect, though, notably, we didn't suffer any network issues with the D4.

However, the Neato D7 and the D4 have the most functional app of the entire group, allowing you to adjust the suction power, view a cleaning map, set maintenance reminders, control the robot, and draw virtual barriers. This feature is unique to these products and is exceptionally convenient, giving them a slight edge over the Roborock and the Roomba apps.

The mobile apps for the other three robots are quite functional. You can manually drive the Roborock around, adjust the suction levels, and view a cleaning map of your home.

The companion mobile app for the Roomba robots also allows you to view a cleaning map of your home and track the life of various accessories on the robot, so you know when you should replace them. Additionally, you can command the i7+ and the s9 to clean specific rooms once they have mapped your home.

It is straightforward to set a schedule on all of these robots through the app, though you can't set it on the robots themselves. However, you can send the robot home or start a spot clean on the robot itself. The D7, the D4, the Roomba s9, the 960, and the i7+ have more flexibility when it comes to interacting with smart home ecosystems like Alexa, Google Home, and IFTTT. The Roborock only worked with Alexa but was quite prone to errors.

Following this top group is the Ecovacs Deebot, which was very reliable when connecting to WiFi. The Ecovacs app is quite lacking, though you can manually control the robot through the app or its remote. The Ecovacs will only work with Alexa, and it is effortless to set up a schedule on its mobile app or its handheld remote.

Next is Samsung POWERbot R7070. Connecting to it over WiFi wasn't very reliable, requiring multiple resets through a process of deleting the robot from the app and reconnecting it. It can work with Alexa, Google Home, and IFTTT and offered average functionality, allowing you to adjust the suction and set maintenance reminders. This robot has both remote and onboard controls, and you can set the schedule from both the app or the remote.

Conclusion


Hopefully, this has helped you decide which robot vacuum is the best fit for your needs and your budget, regardless if you are looking for the absolute best of the best when it comes to these automated assistants or if you are shopping on a tighter budget.

Austin Palmer and David Wise