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The Best Pressure Cookers of 2020

The Instant Pot made everything taste good in our testing  though teh Breville did a slightly better job with meat.
Monday June 8, 2020
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After checking out more than 50 pressure cookers we bought the nine best models in 2020. We used them to cook more than 200 meals, ranging from meaty pork ribs to vegan rice dishes and stews. We recruited a panel of hungry folks to rank the quality of those dishes, while our product testers used the associated preparation and cleanup to grade each model's user-friendliness and ease of cleaning. With all that experience we're now ready to tell you if a pressure cooker would be a good addition to your home, and if so, which model is ready to meet your needs and budget.

Top 8 Product Ratings

Displaying 1 - 5 of 8
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Best Overall Pressure Cooker


Breville Fast Slow Pro


Editors' Choice Award
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  • 5

$243.43
at Amazon
See It

84
OVERALL
SCORE
  • User Friendliness 9
  • Cooking Performance 9
  • Ease of Cleaning 6
  • Cooking Features 10
Capacity: 6 Quart | Saute: Yes
Automatic steam release
User friendly
Great meat
Very expensive

Separating itself from the pack with a streamlined interface and a boatload of cooking features, the Breville The Fast Slow Pro is our favorite overall pressure cooker. It offers by far the largest number of cooking modes and presets, almost to an overwhelming degree. Luckily the Breville provides an incredibly intuitive, three-dial interface that lets you cycle through all of these settings, and fine-tune their pressure levels and cook times, with ease. We particularly liked that the steam release valve on this machine is automated. You can either set the valve to open automatically when the cooking is done, or just open it with the push of a safely-positioned button. Although we didn't feel unsafe using any of the models we tested, it is nice to be able to release the steam without putting your hand anywhere near the valve. The Breville was also the only model that slightly stood out from the pack in cooking ability, particularly when it came to meat. The ribs we made with this machine had a slightly more tender, fall-off-the-bone quality than the rest.

The one thing that might stop you in your tracks with this product is the price. It is double the cost of most models. And while it is, in our opinion, better than the rest of the field, you're talking about considerable extra investment for relatively minor improvements. However, if you like the idea of not getting your hand anywhere near the steam valve, or really like to make ribs, this is an excellent machine that may be worth the extra cost.

Read review: Breville Fast Slow Pro

Easiest to Clean and Use


Instant Pot DUO Nova


Editors' Choice Award
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  • 5

$99.99
at Amazon
See It

81
OVERALL
SCORE
  • User Friendliness 9
  • Cooking Performance 8
  • Ease of Cleaning 7
  • Cooking Features 8
Capacity: 6 Quart | Saute: Yes
User friendly
Reasonably priced
Pressure release button
Easy to clean
Marginally less tender meat than some other models

The best pressure cookers are easy to use and clean, can saute right in the pot, offer reliable cooking performance, and provide an easy way to release the pressure when you're done. The Instant Pot DUO Nova checks all of these boxes while maintaining a mid-tier price tag. Possibly the best feature of this upgraded model is the pressure release button, which lets you safely and easily open the pressure valve without wielding a wooden spoon as a defensive weapon. We also appreciate that the lid can be stored upright in either of the pot's handles, letting you keep the dirty lid off the counter and out of the way no matter which hand you prefer to stir with. These user friendly touches extend to the control panel, whose large LCD screen and dedicated preset cooking buttons make it easy to dial up whatever settings you'd like. And, of course, this machine excelled in our cooking tests, adeptly sauteing even tough veggies and making everything from grains and beans to hearty cuts of meat taste good.

The DUO Nova does have some drawbacks, but they are relatively minor and will likely only apply to a small subset of those shopping for a pressure cooker. Although we found all the meat we prepped in the DUO Nova to be juicy and tender, the Breville Fast Slow Pro was able to best the Nova in both those attributes, particularly with hardier cuts of meat like ribs or brisket. The Nova also lacks some of the specialty dehydrating and air frying functions that the more versatile models like the Ninja Foodi offer. However, the Ninja and the Breville both cost more than twice as much as the Nova. With think it supplies all of the features and performance most people want at a much more reasonable price.

Read review: Instant Pot DUO Nova

Best on a Tight Budget


Tayama TMC-60XL


Best Buy Award
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  • 5

$57.95
(24% off)
at Amazon
See It

44
OVERALL
SCORE
  • User Friendliness 3
  • Cooking Performance 6
  • Ease of Cleaning 5
  • Cooking Features 3
Capacity: 6 Quart | Saute: No
Inexpensive
Decent cooking performance
Lacks a saute function
Relatively difficult to clean

All of the pressure cookers we tested were able to achieve high quality, controlled cooking environments in our testing. So when you spend more, you're generally paying for more a user-friendly interface and easier to clean designs rather than better cooking abilities. If you don't mind dealing with a little extra cleaning and some user-interface idiosyncrasies, the Tayama TMC-60XL offers almost all of the cooking performance of our top picks for an appreciably lower price.

Apart from some quirky controls, the biggest downside of the Tayama is the fact that it doesn't have a saute function. This means you'll have to saute the onions and garlic for your chili in a separate skillet, and then transfer them to the pressure cooker. Most of the other models we tested take the one-pot-meal adage more seriously and allow you to saute right in the pot before adding the rest of the ingredients on top. So the Tayama will require the use of an extra dish or two when cooking certain meals, but that feels like a small price to pay if you're just looking to get the expediency of pressure cooking on the cheap.

Read review: Tayama TMC-60XL

Best Air Fryer Combo


Ninja Foodi


Top Pick Award
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  • 5

$179.99
(22% off)
at Amazon
See It

67
OVERALL
SCORE
  • User Friendliness 5
  • Cooking Performance 8
  • Ease of Cleaning 6
  • Cooking Features 10
Capacity: 6.5 Quart | Saute: Yes
Good pressure cooking performance
Air crisping and dehydrating functions
Expensive
Crisping lid can get in the way

If you're looking for a single, versatile appliance that can pressure cook, air fry, and dehydrate, the Ninja Foodi is the device for you. It manages to do all of these things quite well while taking up much less counter space than three dedicated devices would. It also allows you to easily pressure cook and air fry in the same recipe, meaning you can pressure cook a chicken and then use the air frying function to get the skin crispy.

Stuffing all of this functionality into one device does make for some inconveniences. For example, the large crisping lid that is used for air frying can't be removed when pressure cooking. We found that it gets in the way when stirring and serving. Also, this machine is quite expensive. In fact, it may be more expensive than buying a dedicated pressure cooker and a dedicated air fryer. However, for those that value a single machine that can do it all, we highly recommend the Ninja Foodi.

Read review: Ninja Foodi




Why You Should Trust Us


Senior Research Analyst Michelle Powell has spent the last decade working in the specialty food industry and has managed multiple establishments that serve a wide variety of food. This experience makes her perfect for evaluating the diverse range of foods that these versatile pressure cookers can prepare. Senior Review Editor Max Mutter has been testing and writing about kitchen appliances at TechGearLab for more than four years. In that time he has used over 100 pressure cookers, air fryers, toasters, toaster ovens, blenders, and dehydrators, lending him a well-rounded understanding of what makes a countertop appliance worth the real estate that it occupies.


Analysis and Test Results


In our quest for the most convenient weeknight meals possible, we scoured spec sheets and customer reviews while researching more than 50 different pressure cookers. Once we'd found the models most likely to serve our readers well, we bought all of them at normal retail prices (to maintain the integrity of our testing results we never accept any free samples from manufacturers ). We then made more than 300 meals, meticulously evaluating the cooking, user-friendliness, and cleaning attributes of each machine in a side-by-side manner, all to identify the absolute best one for your home.

Value


In our experience, all pressure cookers can create a good cooking environment, so paying extra generally means getting better interfaces, easier to clean surfaces, or additional cooking functions, rather than better cooking performance (with some minor exceptions). We think the Instant Pot DUO Nova strikes the best balance, offering convenient functions, intuitive controls, and relatively painless cleaning for a middle of the road price. If you want the most cooking functions available the Breville Fast Slow Pro is a great option, but it could cost you twice as much. If you don't mind dealing with some extra cleaning hassles to get super-fast cooking times, the inexpensive Tayama TMC-60XL is a great deal.

We like interfaces that have dedicated buttons for each cooking feature  like the Chefman 9-in-1 Programmable pictured above.
We like interfaces that have dedicated buttons for each cooking feature, like the Chefman 9-in-1 Programmable pictured above.

User Friendliness


With cooking performance relatively similar amongst the cookers we tested, we found user-friendliness to be the most factor that most differentiated these products. We also found two specific aspects of the user experience to be the most significant: the interface/controls, and how the lid stores when not in use. The latter may seem trivial, but having to hold the lid or place it on a crowded counter while stirring is a larger annoyance than you might expect. Therefore our scores in this metric are mostly based on how intuitive we found each machine's control panel, and whether or not there was a convenient place to store the lid while stirring or serving. However, some models also stood out for other reasons.


Two of our favorite models to use, the Instant Pot DUO Nova and the Breville Fast Slow Pro, share one critical feature: a pressure release button. This allows you to release the pressure without getting your hand close to the steam valve. Both of these models also feature large LCD screens and intuitive interfaces. If we had to choose, we'd say we slightly prefer the knobs of the Breville to the buttons of the Nova, but both are straightforward to use. The Nova's lid can be stored on either side of the machine, making it friendly to both left and right-handers, while the Breville's lid is affixed to one side.

You can store the Instant Pot's lid on either side of the pot  which makes for easy serving.
You can store the Instant Pot's lid on either side of the pot, which makes for easy serving.

The Instant Pot DUO Plus 9-in-1 and the Instant Pot DUO60 have the same design and interface as their Nova sibling, but lack a pressure release button. This requires you to use extra caution and some sort of implement like a wooden spoon or silicone glove when opening the steam valve.

The Breville's pressure valve can be opened automatically  or by pressing a button on the front of the unit. It is the only model we tested that doesn't' require you to physically touch the pressure valves when releasing steam.
The Breville's pressure valve can be opened automatically, or by pressing a button on the front of the unit. It is the only model we tested that doesn't' require you to physically touch the pressure valves when releasing steam.

The Breville's dials make scrolling through all the cooking options quick and easy.
The Breville's dials make scrolling through all the cooking options quick and easy.

Just behind the top scorers in this metric with an 8 out of 10 is the Chefman 9-in-1 Programmable. Its lid has a hinge that puts it mostly out of the way for both left and right-handed users. Its control panel follows pretty much the same logic as those of the top scorers, and it felt quite easy to use. However, we did dock its score a bit because some of the messages that pop up on the digital screen are a bit confusing. For example, pressing the 'Delay Timer' button causes the display to briefly read 'dr05'. The first time we did this we were scratching our heads a bit, but beyond this momentary confusion, it didn't hinder us from selecting the settings we wanted.

The Ninja Foodi is the only model we tested that earned a fairly middle-of-the-road score in this metric, picking up a 6 out of 10. Its control panel is the sleekest and simplest to use of all the models we tested. Many products can create a bit of confusion when navigating their various settings, but the Foodi is about as straightforward as they come. However, the secondary crisping lid is permanently attached. This not only makes the unit large and cumbersome, but it often gets in the way while stirring and serving.

The Cuisinart CPC-6000 shares the bottom score of 4 out of 10 in this metric with one other model. This is largely because it lacks some of the small, user-friendly touches present in most other models. First off, it doesn't have anywhere to store its lid, so you either have to hold it or set it down on the counter while serving, which inevitably leads to condensation getting everywhere. We also feel the control panel is less than ideal. It has only two buttons for adjusting the cooking mode and timer, which can lead to a sometimes annoying amount of button pushing to scroll around to your desired settings.

The Tayama TMC-60XL also earned a 4 out of 10 in this metric thanks to some similar shortcomings. It suffers from the nowhere-to-store-the-lid problem, so we found ourselves awkwardly holding the lid while we served or stirred. Its control panel has plenty of buttons for selecting its various settings, but only a single button for adjusting cooking time. This necessitates lots of button pushing to dial in your desired cook time, and if you miss it you'll have to do a lot more pushing to scroll all the way up to the maximum three hours, then back to zero, and then back to your desired setting. This isn't a huge deal, but for those of us with clumsy fingers it may become maddening.

Prepping for just a small portion of our cooking tests.
Prepping for just a small portion of our cooking tests.

Cooking Performance


Pressure cooking, by definition, requires a very controlled cooking environment. Accordingly, it makes sense that all of our cookers produced very similar results in our pressure cooking tests. That's not to say they were identical; some were able to make meat about 5% more tender than other models, while others cooked brown rice about 5% fluffier. However, these small differences are unlikely not be noticed by most people. Therefore, the results below pertain more to the things these cookers do outside of pressure cooking. This is namely their ability to saute onions or sear meat, the kinds of things you do before you close the lid, and start pressure cooking. The more of these preparatory steps that a cooker can do well, the more meals you'll be able to make in a single pot without ever venturing over to the stovetop.


The winner of our cooking performance testing was the Breville Fast Slow Pro, earning an impressive 9 out of 10. It set itself apart from the rest of the field mostly when it came to cooking meat. Its carnivorous offerings were just a tad more tender and moist than those of other models (this was particularly true when we made ribs). It also made rice that was just a bit fluffier than other models, which is significant because we found pressure cookers, in general, to be just slightly inferior to dedicated rice cookers, particularly when it came to brown rice.

The Instant Pot made everything taste good in our testing  though the Breville did a slightly better job with meat.
The Instant Pot made everything taste good in our testing, though the Breville did a slightly better job with meat.

All of the Instant Pot models we tested earned a score of 8 out of 10. These cookers check all the boxes for the things most people will want: good sauteing ability, quick rice and beans, and good, tender meats. However, both the rice and meat these machines made were just slightly less moist and tender than those made with the Breville. That gap in quality is very small, but still noticeable.

The Ninja Foodi's crisping lid lets you make things other cookers can't like sweet potato fries  but it certainly makes the machine more cumbersome to use.
The Ninja Foodi's crisping lid lets you make things other cookers can't like sweet potato fries, but it certainly makes the machine more cumbersome to use.

In our cooking tests the Ninja Foodi performed almost identically to the Instant Pot models, producing succulent results across the board. It also provides an effective saute setting. The large crisping lid that this machine sports allows for a few extra cooking functions, namely air frying and dehydrating. We've also tested both air fryers and dehydrators, and found the Foodi's results to be similar to those from dedicated machines for both of these tasks. These extra features also allow you to finish off a chicken with a crisping cycle to get a crispy skin on the outside. We found this feature to be quite effective, similar to putting the chicken inside a traditional oven on the convection setting for five minutes.

Succulent corned beef made with the Instant Pot.
Succulent corned beef made with the Instant Pot.

Most of the cookers we tested, including the Cuisinart CPC-600 6 Quart, and the Chefman 9-in-1 Programmable, scored 7 out of 10 in our cooking performance test. For the most part these cookers were adept enough at sauteing and slow cooking to make most meals truly 1-pot, and produced rice that was maybe just a tad dry when eaten alone, but that paired well with beans. Where they differed from the top models was in meat preparation, with most cuts lacking just a bit of tenderness when compared to the top models. All of these models also offer only high and low pressure settings, whereas the higher scoring models allow for more fine-tuning of the pressure. While we didn't find this limiting in practice whatsoever, we know it may be a dealbreaker for those that like to tinker with their recipes.

The Breville made the best meat in our testing.
The Breville made the best meat in our testing.

Bringing up the rear in our cooking performance metric is the Tayama TMC-60XL. This machine certainly isn't a poor performer. We were quite pleased with most of the meals it prepared. However, it is one of the few models that lacks a saute function. This severely limits the number of meals you can prepare all in one pot, often necessitating you fire up your stove and pull our a frying pan to make many pressure cooker staples.

We like the stainless steel pots of the Instant Pot models because they can be safely cleaned in a dishwasher.
We like the stainless steel pots of the Instant Pot models because they can be safely cleaned in a dishwasher.

Ease of Cleaning


Here again we saw relatively minor differences between models overall, but some finer points made certain cookers slightly less painful to clean than others. Most of these differences popped up in lid design, condensation issues, and cooking pot material. Lids that can detach from the base unit and that have easily removable gaskets were generally much easier to clean. We also strongly prefer stainless cooking pots over those with nonstick coatings. Stainless doesn't limit the cleaning utensils you can use and it's dishwasher safe (we know many people put nonstick items in the dishwasher, but we tend to take the cautionary route and clean them by hand). Our testing procedure required making at least five meals in each cooker, therefore we cleaned each product at least five times. After all that cleaning we have a very good idea of how laborious each one is to clean.


A slew of models shared the top score of 7 out of 10 in our cleaning testing. All of these models, which include both Instant Pot models and the Chefman 9-in-1 Programmable, have removable lids with easy to extract gaskets. This makes getting into the nooks and crannies of the lids quick and easy. All have condensation catchers to keep water from dripping onto your counter. The actual pots were also relatively easy to clean in all of these machines. The nonstick pot of the Chefman usually had less gunk stuck to them, making hand cleaning easier. However, we slightly prefer the stainless pots of the Instant Pots because they let us do things like scrub them with steel wool or toss them into the dishwasher without worry.

Nonstick pots are generally easier to clean than stainless ones  but are often not dishwasher safe.
Nonstick pots are generally easier to clean than stainless ones, but are often not dishwasher safe.

Why didn't we award any model a score higher than 7 out of 10 in this metric, you may be asking? That's because every model we tested has a narrow groove around the rim where the lid makes its seal. Across the board that groove loves to gather crumbs and liquid, and its skinny enough that it's hard to get even a finger in there to clean. If you're careful this isn't an issue, but one misstep can result in some frustrating cleanup. We understand the groove is integral to the design of most of these pots, but we're still waiting for an enterprising engineer to fix this issue before we award any higher scores.

Many models  like the Cuisinart pictured here  have small containers to catch condensation.
Many models, like the Cuisinart pictured here, have small containers to catch condensation.

A slew of models fell just behind the top scorers in our ease of cleaning metric, including the Cuisinart CPC-600 6 Quart, the Breville Fast Slow Pro, and the Ninja Foodi. All of these models have non-stick pots that are easy to scrub and don't tend to gather baked-on messes. Across the board these models lost out on a top score because of their lid designs. The Cuisinart's lid uses a two-piece design that leaves some extra nooks where water can collect. The Breville's lid must be unscrewed to remove it for cleaning, which is a bit more cumbersome than most models. The Ninja's pressure cooking lid is easy to remove and clean, but the air crisping lid is permanently attached, and thus presents quite a chore when it needs cleaning.


The worst scorer in this metric was the Tayama TMC-60XL, which earned a 5 out of 10. It's not particularly difficult to clean, but presents more challenges than the other models. This is mostly due to the two-piece lid that is hard to dry completely, and a nonstick cooking pot that is not dishwasher safe and slightly stickier than the competitors.

The Breville has the most cooking presets and functions of all the models we tested.
The Breville has the most cooking presets and functions of all the models we tested.

Cooking Features


Pressure cookers are largely attractive because of their versatility and convenience, and more preset cooking modes can benefit both of those attributes. Our cooking features testing examined how many presets each model offers (their relative effectiveness was ascertained in our cooking tests). While it is nice to have more cooking presets, most models can achieve all of these settings by manually adjusting pressure, temperature, and time, so the of a cooking feature shouldn't be considered an outright deal-breaker. The one exception to that may be a saute feature. Most of the models we tested allow you to saute ingredients right in the pot before adding the rest and going into pressure cooking mode. This feature adds real convenience so we gave it more weight than others in our scoring.


The Breville Fast Slow Pro has by far the most presets of all the models we tested. On top of the standard presets for most meats, chilis, grains, and stew, it adds yogurt, porridge, sear, reduce, and sterilize functions, amongst others.

The Ninja Foodi doesn't provide as many specific cooking modes as the Breville, but its secondary lid allows for air crisping, dehydrating, and air frying functions. All of these things are beyond the realm of the other pressure cookers.

Just behind the Breville were the Instant Pot models. They have all the standard functions, plus additional yogurt and porridge settings. The DUO Plus version also has egg and sterilize functions (which earned it the same score as the Breville).

The Instant Pot models come in a close second to the Breville in terms of cooking functions.
The Instant Pot models come in a close second to the Breville in terms of cooking functions.

The Chefman 9-in-1 Programmable has what we would consider the basic set of functions, including saute, something to handle all your grains, chilis, and meats, and slow cook.

The Cuisinart CPC-600 6 Quart is somewhat more spartan in terms of cooking functions. It offers a saute function, and beyond that just lets you set the pressure, temperature, and time. This can effectively mimic most of the presets of other models, you may just need to look up what the ideal pressure and temp settings are for your favorite meals.

At the bottom of the cooking features scoreboard was the Tayama TMC-60XL. It offers some basic grain and meat presets, but notably does not provide a saute function. It is the only model we tested that lacks a saute feature, and this forces you to do some prep on a traditional stovetop for many meals.

Conclusion


A pressure cooker is just about one of the most useful and versatile appliances you can have in your kitchen. If you 're trying to prep more meals yourself and avoid processed foods, a good cooker can eliminate many of the obstacles in the way of that goal. We hope that our experience preparing feasts and doing dishes has led you to the perfect countertop cooker for your home.

Max Mutter and Steven Tata