Reviews You Can Rely On

The Best Blenders of 2021

We tested the top 12 blenders from Vitamix, Cuisinart, NutriBullet, Hamilton Beach, and others to find the best
We subjected every blender to 21 individual performance tests. Milling...
Credit: Austin Palmer
By Austin Palmer and David Wise  ⋅  Sep 12, 2021
Our Editors independently research, test, and rate the best products. We only make money if you purchase a product through our links, and we never accept free products from manufacturers. Learn more

To find the best, we evaluated over 120 different blenders, then bought the 12 top blenders available in 2021. We put each product through an extensive side-by-side testing process, including 21 scientific performance tests. Our tests compared performance on popular blending tasks like making smoothies, margaritas, crushing ice, milling flour, grating hard cheeses, mixing soups, and even making nut butter. We also scored each product on ease of cleaning and ease of use.

This review covers the best full-sized blenders. We also do extensive testing of smaller types of blenders. While smaller blenders don't offer the power and versatility of full-sized models, they take up less space, are more affordable, and may cover all your blending needs. If you are mainly looking for fast blending with minimal clean-up, consider an immersion hand blender which has minimal parts to clean and can fit in a drawer. And if you want to specialize in smoothies, we'd recommend you consider a bullet blender for increased convenience. If you are not sure which style of blender is best for you, check out our detailed blender buying advice.

Editor's Note: This review was updated on September 12, 2021 to include more detail on our testing and rating process.

Top 12 Product Ratings

Displaying 1 - 5 of 12
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Awards Editors' Choice Award Editors' Choice Award   Best Buy Award 
Price $520 List
$499.95 at Amazon
$400 List
$399.95 at Amazon
$600 List
$580.23 at Amazon
$200 List$100 List
$98.99 at Amazon
Overall Score Sort Icon
89
88
86
81
80
Star Rating
  • 1
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  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Pros Excellent at crushing ice, perfect at pureeing, superb at smoothies, durableFantastic smoothies, great at crushing ice, silky-smooth pureesGreat at grinding, fantastic for smoothies, crushes ice with easeFantastic at crushing ice, very convenient, great valueGreat blended drinks, excellent at pureeing, solid at making nut butter
Cons PriceyBlade showed signs of wear and tearNot the most convenient to use, expensiveMotor felt underpowered for pureeing nut butterNo presets, digital timer
Bottom Line This burly blender earned the top score overall but comes at a premium priceThis is one of our all-around favorite kitchen appliances and we highly recommend it for all of your blending needsThis top-of-the-line blender did exceptionally well in our tests, but there are less expensive model that performed comparablyIf you are searching for a solid blender on a budget, the Ninja Chef should be your first choiceThis budget blender holds its own with the top-tier products fairly well
Rating Categories Vitamix A2500 Ascen... Cuisinart Hurricane... Vitamix Pro 750 Ninja Chef High-Spe... NutriBullet Blender
Smoothies (30%)
9.0
9.0
9.0
8.3
8.3
Ice (20%)
10.0
10.0
10.0
9.0
10.0
Convenience (20%)
7.2
6.9
5.9
7.1
5.2
Pureeing (15%)
10.0
10.0
9.6
7.9
10.0
Grinding (15%)
8.2
8.4
8.6
8.2
6.7
Specs Vitamix A2500 Ascen... Cuisinart Hurricane... Vitamix Pro 750 Ninja Chef High-Spe... NutriBullet Blender
Model Number A2500 CBT-2000 750 CT805, CT810, CT815 ZNBF30400Z
Power Peak 2.2 HP Peak 3.5 HP Peak 2.2 HP Peak 2 HP 1.6 HP
DImensions 11" x 8" x 17" 10.05" x 8.50" x 17.55" 17.5" x 9.4" x 7.7" 17.99" x 9.72" x 8.46" 16.5" x 9.8" x 7.5"
Jar size 64 oz 64 oz 64 oz 72 oz (64 oz max liquid capacity) 64 oz
Dishwasher safe Yes Yes No Yes Pitcher; top rack only
Accessories Tamper None Tamper Tamper Tamper
Digital Timer Yes Yes Yes Yes No
Presets Yes, 3
  • Smoothie
  • Frozen Drink
  • Soup
  • Even though it didn't have a "Clean" ; I just used the smoothie preset to clean it
Yes,
  • Clean
  • Soup
  • Smoothie (Fruit and Green)
  • Ice Crush
Yes, 5
  • Smoothie
  • Frozen Drink
  • Soup
  • Puree
  • Clean
Yes, 10
  • Flour/Mill
  • Frozen Drink
  • Extract
  • Smoothie
  • Soup
  • Ice Cream
  • Puree
  • Dip/Salsa
  • Dressing
  • Nut Butter
None


Best Overall Blender


Cuisinart Hurricane Pro


88
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Smoothies 9
  • Ice 10
  • Convenience 6.9
  • Pureeing 10
  • Grinding 8.4
Peak Power: 3.5 HP | Jar Size: 64 oz.
Silkiest smoothies
Excellent at pureeing
Crushes ice with ease
Blades showed signs of wear

The Cuisinart Hurricane Pro was the best overall blender, just one point shy of the Vitamix A2500 for the top score of the entire bunch, yet significantly less expensive. This model makes silky-smooth smoothies and magnificently mixed margaritas. In addition to delicious beverages, this product easily powers through other tasks like milling flour and cornmeal or grating hard cheese without any trouble. It pureed velvety-smooth tomato soup and even heated it enough to serve right out of the pitcher. This top-of-the-line product is convenient and excels across the board. It would make an excellent addition to any kitchen appliance lineup.

However, we did notice some minor signs of wear and tear on the blade after our admittedly intense testing process. This should only be a concern if you plan to frequently do tasks that are hard on the blade, such as crushing ice without liquid, milling cornmeal, or making nut butter.

Read review: Cuisinart Hurricane Pro

Best for Long-term Use


Vitamix A2500 Ascent Series


89
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Smoothies 9
  • Ice 10
  • Convenience 7.2
  • Pureeing 10
  • Grinding 8.2
Peak Power: 2.2 HP | Jar Size: 64 oz.
Dishwasher safe
No sign of wear
Makes excellent nut butter
Pricey

Earning the highest score, just one point ahead of the Cuisinart, the Vitamix A2500 Ascent Series is a premium product that excelled in the bulk of our tests, including the most difficult ones like milling flour and crushing ice. This model does a fantastic job at pureeing soup, and it can even warm it up to piping hot, ready to serve. On top of all that, the blades on this burly product showed practically zero signs of wear after our testing, so if you're planning to use your blender daily, it should make an excellent choice and offer lasting value.

Unfortunately, with a price tag that's a few hundred dollars more than our other top scorer, the Cuisinart Hurricane Pro, this product is definitely on the expensive side. However, if you are willing to invest in quality, the Vitamix A2500 is the absolute best of our extensive testing, offers long-term value, and can handle any blending challenge you throw at it.

Read review: Vitamix A2500 Ascent Series

Best Bang for the Buck


NutriBullet Blender


80
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Smoothies 8.3
  • Ice 10
  • Convenience 5.2
  • Pureeing 10
  • Grinding 6.7
Peak Power: 1.61 HP | Jar Size: 64 oz.
Fantastic at pureeing
Heats soups
Great at crushing ice and blending drinks
No presets or timers
Can be more difficult to clean

If the top models' price tags are well outside your budget, then it's worth checking out the NutriBullet Blender. We were surprised by this budget competitor's excellent performance, holding its own against other models that cost significantly more. It makes excellent blended beverages and smoothies and even excelled in some of the more difficult blending tasks, such as grating hard cheeses and pureeing nut butter. The NutriBullet can even heat soup to serving temperature while it's blending — something only the most powerful blenders can do.

However, we discovered that the budget price of the NutriBullet comes with some compromises. This product is a bit less user-friendly and convenient to operate. It doesn't have a digital timer and lacks any automatic preset cycles for different blending tasks, so you'll have to play it by ear until you get used to how long it takes to blend on the different power cycles. We also think it's a little difficult to clean under the blade. However, we found these issues to be forgivable due to the cost savings this product offers over the top tier models.

Read review: NutriBullet Blender

Best for the Tightest of Budgets


Hamilton Beach 58148A


57
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Smoothies 5.9
  • Ice 7.3
  • Convenience 5.5
  • Pureeing 6.1
  • Grinding 2.7
Peak Power: 0.94 HP | Jar Size: 40 oz.
Very inexpensive
Good for smoothies
No timed presets
Struggled to grate hard cheeses

If you are shopping for a blender on the absolute tightest of budgets, then we think the Hamilton Beach 58148A is a fantastic choice. This product is usually one of the cheapest options on the market by far and actually holds its own quite well against some of the premium models. It delivered solid results when it came to making smoothies and blended drinks — even making smooth and creamy almond and peanut butter without too much trouble. It's overall simple and easy to use, and cleanup is a breeze with a pitcher, blade, and lid that are all dishwasher-safe.

However, this lower power product does struggle a bit with some of the harder tasks. It didn't really manage to powder sugar, mill corn kernels, or grate parmesan cheese, even with additional time allotted. It also doesn't have any timed presets, and the lid can be a bit hard to remove, but if you are shopping on a tight budget, we think this appliance is hard to beat.

Read review: Hamilton Beach 58148A

Best for Daily Smoothie Drinkers


Nutri Ninja DUO Blender


52
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Smoothies 4.4
  • Ice 8.1
  • Convenience 6.4
  • Pureeing 3.4
  • Grinding 3.2
Peak Power: 2.0 HP | Jar Size: 72 oz.
Fantastic at crushing ice
Personal smoothie cups are very convenient
Most parts are dishwasher-safe
The main pitcher didn't make the best smoothies
The triple-blade can be hard to clean by hand

If you are a daily smoothie drinker, then the Ninja Blender DUO could be a great choice for you. This appliance is certainly a good option if you're routinely making blended drinks for one, but it doesn't top the charts when it comes to overall performance. Multiple personal cups are included that make it easy to whip up a to-go breakfast smoothie in the morning. The triple-blade in its main pitcher also does an excellent job crushing ice for blended drinks, and it's not too much of a hassle to clean.

Although we were huge fans of the smoothies this appliance made in its personal smoothie cups, we weren't impressed with the results when we used the large pitcher. Many of our recipes came out worse than when we used other products, and we found the texture to be very inconsistent. Despite this disappointment, it's hard to overlook the personal cups' added convenience if you're making smoothies regularly.

Read review: Nutri Ninja DUO

Each blender in our review was put through a gauntlet of 21...
Each blender in our review was put through a gauntlet of 21 individual performance tests so we could rate each product in a fair and objective manner.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

Why You Should Trust Us


Our testing protocol for blenders is extensive; we've conducted more than 420 individual tests to evaluate the 20 blenders we've tested over the last few years. Our tests prove that blenders vary widely in their performance and best application. To help you find the perfect one for your needs, we buy each blender ourselves, accepting no freebies from manufacturers to assure complete independence. Then we perform a barrage of 21 individual tests on each model.

Our testing is divided across five rating metrics:
  • Smoothie tests (30% of overall score weighting)
  • Ice tests (20% weighting)
  • Convenience tests (20% weighting)
  • Pureeing tests (15% weighting)
  • Grinding tests (15% weighting)

Each metric's contribution to the overall score is weighted based on how important we believe it is for most people's purchase decision-making. This exhaustive testing and rating process puts us in a unique position to help you find just the right blender for your needs.

Using a SPL meter to record how loud each blender is in dBa.
Using a SPL meter to record how loud each blender is in dBa.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

Our blender review team is made up of Austin Palmer and David Wise. Combined, both have tested over 500 kitchen products including food processors, microwaves, vacuum sealers, juicers, and many others. Both David and Austin have been testing blenders since 2016. They also bring their expertise as avid home chefs to this review.

To assure scientific and fair comparison testing, we use the same smoothie and blended beverage recipes in each product. Then, a panel of judges performs blind taste-testing without knowing which blender made them, scoring them on texture, consistency, and flavor. We also used each blender for less common but more difficult tasks, including milling flour and making nut butter. These tasks are much more taxing for a blender and truly pushed them to their limits! Finally, we also tested ease of use, awarding points top display interfaces, and also rated each on how easy they are to clean.

The Pro 750 was a top competitor for making smoothies.
The Vitamix A2500 makes efficient work of ice and frozen drinks.

Analysis and Test Results


The following sections detail the results of our tests, where we note which blenders stood out for their performance, good or bad, in each of our tests.


Which Blender Offers the Best Value?


You will probably notice right off the bat that all of the premium blenders come at correspondingly premium prices that could set you back a hefty amount. Examples of these include the Cuisinart Hurricane Pro and the Vitamix A2500. However, don't be discouraged if the idea of spending a few hundred bucks on a kitchen appliance inspires panic. The NutriBullet Blender is an excellent all-around product that retails for less than half the price, and it held its own in the majority of our tests against the A2500 and the Hurricane Pro. It has plenty of power for grating hard cheeses, making nut butter, and milling cornmeal and flour. Its primary drawback is that it isn't quite as easy to use, but it's still a fantastic value option if you are shopping and trying to maximize your budget. If you are trying to spend as little as possible, then the Hamilton Beach 58148A is by far our top recommendation. Though it struggles with some of the more difficult tasks, it still does a great job with typical blending tasks and costs a mere fraction of the price of the premium models.

Making a great smoothie is a key trait for any blender.
Making a great smoothie is a key trait for any blender.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

Which Blender Makes The Best Smoothies?


Smoothies are the most important rating metric due to their popularity as a blending task, and smoothie performance makes up 30% of the overall score. To rate each product on smoothies, we put them to the challenge of blending four popular types of smoothies:
  • Our Berry smoothie test (30% of Smoothie score weighting)
  • Our Green smoothie test (30% weighting)
  • Our Fruit, Nut & Oat smoothie test (25% weighting)
  • Our Oreo Milkshake test (15% weighting)

Each test was rated, weighted for importance, and then a total score was calculated based on the results. We followed the manufacturer's recommended instructions for blending a smoothie for each machine and had a panel of judges do blind taste tests to score the consistency and texture of each beverage that we mixed up.


Tying for the top score on Smoothies and earning a 9 out of 10 were the Cuisinart Hurricane Pro, Vitamix A2500 Ascent Series, Vitamix Pro 750, and the Vitamix 5200. Any of these four would be a great match for a person or family that loves smoothies.

The Pro 750 makes easy work of all the berry seeds.
The Pro 750 makes easy work of all the berry seeds.
Credit: Austin Palmer

Results of the Four Smoothie Tests


Each product was given a score for each individual type of smoothie, which was weighted for the relative level of importance and calculated into the overall smoothie score.

Smoothies Test Score Comparison

 
AwardsEditors' Choice Award Editors' Choice Award Best Buy Award Best Buy Award Top Pick Award 
Price$520 List
$499.95 at Amazon
$400 List
$399.95 at Amazon
$100 List
$98.99 at Amazon
$30 List$180 List
$170.60 at Amazon
Smoothies Score
9.0
9.0
8.3
5.9
4.4
Berry Smoothie (30%)
10
9
8
6
4
Green Smoothie (30%)
10
10
9
6
5
Fruit Nut & Oat (25%)
6
7
8
5
2
Oreo Milkshake (15%)
10
10
8
7
8

Just a touch of a preset away from an ultra smooth berry smoothie.
Just a touch of a preset away from an ultra smooth berry smoothie.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

Berry Smoothie Test


For the berry smoothie test, we strained the final mixture, looking to see if each competing product successfully destroyed all of the berry seeds and skins, as well as completely blended all of the fruit.


The Vitamix products were just amazing in our berry smoothie test. The A2500 and the 5200 did the best, completely obliterating not only the fruit but the seeds as well. The Vitamix Pro 750 destroyed all of the seeds but left a few residual pieces of unblended strawberry.

The A2500 was a top performer for our berry smoothie test.
The A2500 was a top performer for our berry smoothie test.
Credit: Austin Palmer

The Cuisinart Hurricane struggled a little when it came to blending up the berry seeds, leaving significantly more than the trio of Vitamix models. This was done while using the "Fruit Smoothie" setting, which runs for about 45 seconds. These products all carried their excellent performances into our berry smoothie test, though the Cuisinart did perform just a slight bit worse than the Vitamix models.

The NutriBullet made short work of some frozen berries.
The NutriBullet made short work of some frozen berries.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

In a second performance tier, the NutriBullet Blender and the Ninja Chef both merit an 8 out of 10. The NutriBullet did an excellent job creating all four of the drinks in this metric, particularly the green smoothie. On its high setting, it chewed through all the spinach and kale in about a minute, only failing to liquefy a small clump of leaves. The finished drink had hardly any foam with a great texture and taste. The NutriBullet performed similarly with the berry smoothie, creating its own excellent drink with only a few noticeable seed particles that weren't completely crushed up.

The Oster and the Ninja Duo performed poorly in our berry smoothie...
The Oster and the Ninja Duo performed poorly in our berry smoothie test, with many seeds escaping the blades.
Credit: Austin Palmer

At the back of the pack, the Nutri Ninja and the Oster Versa Pro each earned a 4 out of 10 for their mediocre showing in the smoothie showdown. Of this duo, the Oster Versa Pro produced the best green smoothie, although it still wasn't very impressive. Even though it was the most smoothie-like of this group, it was ultimately hard to drink due to its chunkiness.

The A2500 made a fantastically smooth and delectable green smoothie.
The A2500 made a fantastically smooth and delectable green smoothie.
Credit: Austin Palmer

Green Smoothie Test


For our green smoothie test, we judged how well each product liquefied some leafy greens. We again strained the mixture, looking for a completely liquid beverage. We also scored each smoothie on its texture and its flavor profile. Kale proved to be particularly challenging for many blenders. The top-scoring products created a drink with a uniform texture and taste throughout, while poor performers had a wildly varying taste and consistency throughout the drink.

The Vitamix A2500 green smoothie poured effortlessly through the...
The Vitamix A2500 green smoothie poured effortlessly through the sieve.
Credit: Austin Palmer

The Cuisinart Hurricane matched this performance using its "Green Smoothie" button. However, it did take about 35 seconds longer than the Vitamix brand models.

Our fruit, oat, and nut smoothie was difficult for some of the...
Our fruit, oat, and nut smoothie was difficult for some of the blenders to handle.
Credit: Austin Palmer

Fruit, Nut, and Oat Smoothie Test


For the fruit and oat smoothie, we evaluated if each product completely broke down the fruit, almonds, and oats, as well as the texture. The best blenders achieved a smooth and creamy mix, while the mediocre ones created a drink that was thick and grainy. We also took into account if we needed to scrape the pitcher to get it to blend successfully.

The Fruit, Nut, and Oat smoothie test proved to be a surprisingly difficult task for some products because there isn't any liquid in the recipe, only almonds, strawberries, bananas, oats, yogurt, and maple syrup. The Vitamix 5200 performed the best, but it took a long time for the mixture to resemble a smoothie and a decent amount of coaxing with the tamper to get it to blend. The final mixture was a little on the grainy side but consistent. The Cuisinart Hurricane Pro blended the next best smoothie. It was relatively smooth and gave us no major issue in the process, but it was slightly grainier than the berry smoothie it produced and was inferior to the fruit and oat smoothie made by the Vitamix 5200.

The Cuisinart Hurricane Pro tied for 2nd top performer in our super...
The Cuisinart Hurricane Pro tied for 2nd top performer in our super thick smoothie of oats and yogurt.
Credit: Austin Palmer

The worst performers on this test were Pro 750 and the Vitamix A2500. It was surprising to see the number of whole almond chunks that both drinks had, earning them a lower score from our taste test panel. However, we appreciated that the rest of the drink wasn't overly grainy and had a fairly smooth texture.

The A2500 ready to ascend to the top of our tastebuds with this...
The A2500 ready to ascend to the top of our tastebuds with this mouthwatering Oreo shake.
Credit: Austin Palmer

Oreo Milkshake Test


For our Oreo Malted Milkshake test, we rated each product on how well it completely broke down the sandwich cookies, whether or not there were any chunks of ice cream that did not get mixed into the drink, and if we had to intervene to get the mixture to blend. Some models demolished everything without issue, while other times, we had to repeatedly stop and scrape the sides of the pitcher to get it to liquefy.

3 of our contenders ready to make some delicious Oreo malts.
3 of our contenders ready to make some delicious Oreo malts.
Credit: Austin Palmer

The Vitamix Pro 750, Vitamix A2500, and the Cuisinart Hurricane Pro all delivered a flawless performance, creating a perfect malted milkshake without any additional effort on our part. The Vitamix 5200 also did well, but at the beginning, it took some nudging to get it blending. It also left some small clumps of ice cream unblended, but it was still an excellent milkshake.

The Cuisinart Hurricane Pro was a top performer for making frozen...
The Cuisinart Hurricane Pro was a top performer for making frozen drinks.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

Crushed Ice Performance


The Ice metric accounts for 20% of the final score for each product. Here we compare how well each machine could crush ice and the quality of a blended margarita made by each one.


Once again, the Cuisinart Hurricane Pro, Vitamix A2500, and the Vitamix Pro 750 came out ahead of the pack, but this time they were joined by the NutriBullet. All four of these models earned top scores for their phenomenal performances, crushing the ice cubes in 15 seconds or less, and none exhibited the slightest sign of a struggle.

Ice stood no chance in the Vitamix 750 or any of the other Vitamix...
Ice stood no chance in the Vitamix 750 or any of the other Vitamix products in our testing.
Credit: Austin Palmer

The Crushed Ice Tests


We ranked and scored each appliance on how it performed at crushing a full pitcher of ice without any liquid and on its skill at blending a perfect margarita.

Ice Test Score Comparison

 
AwardsEditors' Choice Award Editors' Choice Award Best Buy Award Best Buy Award Top Pick Award 
Price$520 List
$499.95 at Amazon
$400 List
$399.95 at Amazon
$100 List
$98.99 at Amazon
$30 List$180 List
$170.60 at Amazon
Ice Score
10.0
10.0
10.0
7.3
8.1
Straight Up Ice (35%)
10
10
10
6
10
Margarita (65%)
10
10
10
8
7

Straight-up Ice Test


The straight-up ice-crushing test was simple. We filled each pitcher with ice and followed the manufacturer's directions to crush it. We deducted points if the instructions said to add water, and we evaluated how well the ice fed into the blades, whether it crushed continuously or if we had to pulse the power to get it to feed.

Most of the products excelled at the ice-crushing test, with 7 of 12 products earning perfect 10 scores. The main thing this test did was shine a light on the few products that performed poorly including the Oster and Hamilton products.

The Hamilton Beach 58148A finished out the back of the group on ice-crushing. It struggled to crush the ice, as the base of the pitcher would block up and keep ice cubes at the top from reaching the blades.

Margarita Ice Test


For our margarita challenge, we made the same recipe in each blender, again following the manufacturer's recommendation. Our panel then judged the texture and consistency of each beverage, only consuming them in moderation, of course!

The Cuisinart Hurricane, Vitamix A2500, Vitamix 750, and the NutriBullet all scored perfect 10 of 10 ratings on Margaritas. The KitchenAid produced a great (but not excellent) margarita — it just wasn't quite as smooth as the Vitamix A2500 or the Cuisinart. The Vitamix 5200 created a comparable drink in quality to the KitchenAid but struggled a bit more when it came to blending it. Instead, it required us to stop, pulse it, and shake the pitcher until things were more thoroughly liquefied.

The worst performer on this test was the Nutri Ninja which didn't create a very consistent margarita. The beverage's texture was okay, but there were a decent number of unblended chunks of ice unevenly distributed throughout the drink.

The Cuisinart is quite convenient to use.
The Cuisinart is quite convenient to use.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

Convenience


The Convenience metric comprises 20% of the total score. We evaluated how much work it took to use each product, with scores based on the difficulty of hand-washing each model, whether or not it was dishwasher safe, how easy it is to remove the lid, and whether or not the pitcher would dry when left on the base. We also assessed the quality of the presets on the machine and their labeling.


Tying for the top spot, the Cuisinart Hurricane Pro, the Ninja Chef High-Speed, and the Vitamix A2500 Ascent Series all had exceptional performances earning a 7 out of 10. These models are all completely dishwasher-safe, with their blades, lids, and pitchers rated for automatic washing.

The Blendtec, on the other hand, was more suitable for cleaning by hand since its pitcher must be placed on the top rack, and the lid isn't dishwasher friendly.

The Blendtex isn&#039;t dishwasher-safe but is very easy to wash by hand.
The Blendtex isn't dishwasher-safe but is very easy to wash by hand.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

Luckily, the blades aren't as sharp as some of the other products, and the pitcher on the Blendtec's is also very easy to clean manually.

Convenience Tests


We scored convenience on 7 different factors. The ease of washing was the highest weighted factor, with simple to clean and dishwasher safe products getting the best marks.

Convenience Test Score Comparison

 
AwardsEditors' Choice Award Editors' Choice Award Best Buy Award Best Buy Award Top Pick Award 
Price$520 List
$499.95 at Amazon
$400 List
$399.95 at Amazon
$100 List
$98.99 at Amazon
$30 List$180 List
$170.60 at Amazon
Convenience Score
7.2
6.9
5.2
5.5
6.4
Dishwasher (30%)
8
8
4
8
8
Hand Washing (15%)
8
7
8
10
4
Drying (10%)
7
8
1
1
1
Digital Timer (5%)
8
8
3
3
8
Labeling (10%)
5
6
6
6
6
Presets (15%)
5
7
3
3
5
Removing The Lid (15%)
8
4
10
2
10

We rated the ease of cleaning the components of each blender by hand, noting any problem areas that are difficult to reach or if it was hard to clean the blades without getting cut, like the Nutri Ninja's triple blade.

You&#039;ll need to take great care when hand-washing this Nutri Ninja...
You'll need to take great care when hand-washing this Nutri Ninja blade. It is sharp!
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

We also scored the ease of drying after washing. One factor we considered, for those of you who are hygienically minded (like we are), was if it is possible to place the pitcher back on the base in a way that it would dry adequately after washing or if you needed to lay out all the components on a drying rack to prevent mold.

Before storing make sure all parts are completely dry, you don&#039;t...
The KitchenAid Diamond.

We tested and rated the ease of using the front panel and digital timer, whether the labeling is clear, how easy it is to remove the lid, and whether the product offers pragmatic and helpful presets.

We used a professional-quality sound meter to precisely test and...
We used a professional-quality sound meter to precisely test and compare the noise levels of each blender
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

Noise Levels


We used a decibel sound meter to measure the noise level of each product, but that test did not prove useful in separating the products out. What we found was that all the blenders came out between 82 dBa and 88 dBa, which is really quite loud: louder than most garbage disposals, and just a tad less noise than a typical gas-powered lawnmower. We concluded that all the blenders we tested are noisy, with the best performing products a bit more so, and none of the products we tested would be satisfying if your top purchase criteria are low noise levels.

Gearing up to make some tomato soup.
Gearing up to make some tomato soup.
Credit: Austin Palmer

Pureeing


Pureeing performance constitutes 15% of the final score for each blender.


Receiving the best score possible, the Cuisinart Hurricane Pro, Vitamix A2500, the NutriBullet, and the Vitamix Pro 750 all earned a 10 out of 10 for their perfect pureeing performance. The Pro 750 and the A2500 both produced a nice and creamy spread after about 8 minutes of operation. The Hurricane Pro also took about 8 minutes to finish, but the final product produced by the Hurricane was slightly grainier than the nut butter produced by the Vitamix.

The powerful motor easily churned these nuts into butter.
The powerful motor easily churned these nuts into butter.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

The NutriBullet required just a tiny nudge to get going but didn't struggle at all once we added a tiny splash of oil. It also took about 8 minutes to create some peanut and almond butter, and the resulting spread was smooth and creamy, with an almost perfect texture.

Pureeing Tests


Our ratings for this category came from two very different pureed food tests. We made a pureed tomato soup and blended nut butter with almonds and peanuts in this metric. Additionally, we also awarded points if machines were able to heat the soup while it was being pureed — a hallmark trait of high-powered blenders.

Pureeing Test Score Comparison

 
AwardsEditors' Choice Award Editors' Choice Award Best Buy Award Best Buy Award Top Pick Award 
Price$520 List
$499.95 at Amazon
$400 List
$399.95 at Amazon
$100 List
$98.99 at Amazon
$30 List$180 List
$170.60 at Amazon
Pureeing Score
10.0
10.0
10.0
6.1
3.4
Nut Butter (45%)
10
10
10
8
3
Tomato Soup (45%)
10
10
10
5
4
Heating (10%)
10
10
10
2
2

The Vitamix A2500, the NutriBullet, and the Hurricane smashed our soup test, each earning perfect scores. These appliances produced a uniform soup that poured right through a fine-mesh sieve. The Pro 750 performed just a little bit worse than the other three products. The sieve did catch a few unblended chunks when we poured the Pro 750's soup through it but still did an overall excellent job. We were also impressed that all four of these products could heat the soup to a serving temperature while pureeing, with the soup measuring over 150°F after blending.

Some blenders can actually heat up your soup &amp;#40;if blended for...
Some blenders can actually heat up your soup (if blended for long enough, about 5-6 minutes) as you puree.
Credit: Austin Palmer

Finishing at the back of the pack, the Nutri Ninja earned a 3 out of 10. The nut butter it produced was very thick and incredibly grainy, but at least resembled a spread, even though there was a long way to go. It did an average job at pureeing the soup, though it failed to heat it above 85°F.

Quickly grate up your favorite cheeses.
Quickly grate up your favorite cheeses.
Credit: Austin Palmer

Grinding


Accounting for the final 15% of the score, our Grinding metric offered some of the most difficult tasks for these products. To determine the scores, we made powdered sugar and cornmeal, as well as shredded hard parmesan cheese to see what these models could do.


In a bit of an upset, the Vitamix Pro 750 took home the top score, earning a 9 out of 10. This model made extremely fine powdered sugar and cornmeal, with 99% or so of the finished product making it through the sieve. It also did very well at grinding up the parmesan cheese, though it wasn't quite the best, remaining slightly coarser than the ground cheese produced by the Hurricane.

The Hurricane Pro, the VERSA Pro, the Ninja Chef, the Vitamix A2500, and the Vitamix 5200 all earned an 8 out of 10.

Grinding Performance Tests


We performed 3 different tests on each blender to score grinding performance: we milled cornmeal, grated parmesan cheese, and made powdered sugar to determine the scores.

Grinding Test Score Comparison

 
AwardsEditors' Choice Award Editors' Choice Award Best Buy Award Best Buy Award Top Pick Award 
Price$520 List
$499.95 at Amazon
$400 List
$399.95 at Amazon
$100 List
$98.99 at Amazon
$30 List$180 List
$170.60 at Amazon
Grinding Score
8.2
8.4
6.7
2.7
3.2
Sugar (25%)
9
8
7
2
2
Parmesan (40%)
7
9
7
2
5
Flour (35%)
9
8
6
4
2

The Ninja Chef, the 5200, and the A2500 all produced very fine powdered sugar — equivalent to the Pro 750. The mixture made by the VERSA was just a little grainier, which knocked down its score slightly. The powdered sugar made by the Hurricane Pro matched the Vitamix's but took much longer than the manufacturer's recommended time to achieve that consistency.

In the parmesan cheese challenge, the Hurricane Pro did the best of the entire group, creating the most finely grated cheese, with the VERSA Pro tying the Vitamix Pro 750. The 5200 and the A2500 created a slightly coarser product than the Pro 750 or the VERSA. The Ninja Chef was about the same as the 5200 or the A2500 in terms of coarseness but left a few larger ungrated pieces at the bottom of the pitcher.

Worst &amp;#40;left&amp;#41; to best &amp;#40;right&amp;#41; in our corn flour test.
Worst (left) to best (right) in our corn flour test.
Credit: Austin Palmer

The A2500, Hurricane Pro, Vitamix 5200, and the VERSA all performed about the same at grinding popcorn into cornmeal, with about 95% of the finished product passing through the sieve, compared to the 99% for the Vitamix Pro 750. The Ninja Chef matched the Pro 750, with 99% of the cornmeal passing through the sieve.

The Cleanblend wasn&#039;t super effective at grinding up parmesan.
The Cleanblend wasn't super effective at grinding up parmesan.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

The Nutri Ninja and Hamilton Beach 58148A delivered the worst performances of the bunch in our grinding metric. When we tried to make powdered sugar, they both left behind tons of granulated sugar, even after we left them running for significant amounts of time. They also did poorly at milling corn kernels, with more than three-fourths of the milled corn remaining too large to pass through a sieve after blending, with the Hamilton Beach 58148A doing just a bit better than the Nutri Ninja. The Nutri Ninja did redeem itself slightly when it came to grating hard parmesan cheese, producing a coarse but acceptable grated result. Some larger chunks, however, completely escaped the blades. The Hamilton Beach 58148A did even worse, with the bulk of the cheese remaining intact.

Compare Products

select up to 5 products to compare
Score Product Price Our Take
89
$520
Editors' Choice Award
This product is one of the best blenders available, handling everything we threw at it
88
$400
Editors' Choice Award
We think it's hard to go wrong with this kitchen appliance if you want the best of the best for your blending needs
86
$600
While this blender did match our award winners in terms of performance, it does retail for a price that is significantly higher
81
$200
If you are looking for a budget blender that makes fantastic frozen drinks and superb smoothies, look no further than the Ninja
80
$100
Best Buy Award
If you are shopping on a budget, it's hard to go wrong with the Nutribullet Blender
79
$450
Finishing near the top of the pack, the Vitamix 5200 delivered a great, not amazing performance
76
$500
While we didn't find any major flaws with the Blendtec, it's priced like a top product, rather than one that scored in the middle of the group
67
$180
While the Cleanblend performed quite well in all of our metrics, there are other products that did far better overall for the same price
66
$160
For those that want a great blender and don't want to pay a premium price, the KitchenAid Diamond is a solid option
60
$250
While the Versa Pro had a few standout performances, it overall scored quite low
57
$30
Best Buy Award
While certainly not the best appliance out there, this is one of the best we have seen at its price point
52
$180
Top Pick Award
The main distinguishing feature of this product is its personal-sized blender cups but is otherwise quite unimpressive

Conclusion


Whether you are looking for a top-tier model that can do it all or a budget option that can handle your daily smoothie with ease, we hope you now feel confident to select a blender that fits your needs and budget. Although the enormous spread of prices and features can make picking the perfect blender a seemingly dauntless task, we are here to help, and hopefully, this review has accomplished that.

Austin Palmer and David Wise