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The 5 Best Battery Chainsaws of 2024

We tested battery chainsaws from Ego Power+, Husqvarna, Makita, Milwaukee, and more, to help you find the best product to match your needs
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Best Battery Chainsaw Review (Whether you are shopping for a cordless chainsaw for ornamental pruning, all-day   heavy-duty cutting, or something to...)
Whether you are shopping for a cordless chainsaw for ornamental pruning, all-day heavy-duty cutting, or something to match your current power tool batteries, we tested all of the best models so that you can be sure you're making the right purchase.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman
By Ross Patton and Chris McNamara  ⋅  Apr 2, 2024

The Best Battery Chainsaws for 2024


Looking to purchase a battery chainsaw? To eliminate any guesswork, we researched, bought, and tested 12 of the best battery-powered models available today through hands-on, side-by-side analysis. We formulated a comprehensive series of experiments and tests to determine which tools display the best sawing performance, battery life, user-friendliness, and even how much noise each model produces. We then took every model to the woodyard to get a feel for them in a real-world environment. After weeks of testing, it became clear which saws could cut down the competition. To see how gas and corded models compare to battery saws, see our review of the best chainsaws.

If you are interested in other supplies, check out our list of the best tools to get started on your next project. In addition, we've tested top drills, best stud finders, and ranked the best leaf blowers. We've also put some of the best handsaws, the top circular saws, and best cordless circular saws to the test and outlined our picks for the best miter saws.

Editor's Note: On April 2, 2024 add in a new top performer, the Ego CS2005.

Top 13 Battery Chainsaws - Test Results

Displaying 1 - 5 of 13
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Awards Top Pick Award     
Price $130 List
$92.49 at Amazon
$275 List
$136.40 at Amazon
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$239.99 at Amazon
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Check Price at Amazon
$240 List
$249.95 at Amazon
Overall Score
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Pros Compact, light, quiet, affordableLight, quiet, small, cheapSpectacular battery life, two chain speed settings, barely consumes bar and chain oilAdjustable oil flow, unique chain tensioning system, great if you already own the batteriesGood cutting power, has tabs on oil cap for leverage
Cons Mediocre battery life, slow at making cutsLacking performance, weak battery, no chain brakeNot the strongest cutting power, plastic chain tensioning system, electronic controls slow down sawingHaving two batteries is not ideal, loud, inconvenient electronic button, expensiveConsumes an absurd amount of oil, no chain brake, awkward battery compartment location
Bottom Line This cordless electric chainsaw is our favorite 20V model for small, quick projects around the yardThis gets small jobs done with ease but lacks powerA good degree of performance and an exceptional battery life at a reasonable priceA commendable cordless chainsaw that can be quite a drain on your bank account unless you already own Makita batteriesA cordless chainsaw that is overpriced for its performance that we wouldn't recommend purchasing
Rating Categories Worx WG322 Black+Decker 40V MAX Husqvarna 120i Makita XCU03Z LXT Ryobi 40V RY40530
Saw Performance (35%)
5.5
4.5
5.5
7.5
4.5
Ease of Use (30%)
7.0
6.0
6.0
5.0
6.0
Battery (25%)
4.0
3.0
8.0
6.0
4.0
Noise (5%)
7.9
7.4
7.0
4.0
5.2
Weight (5%) Sort Icon
9.4
8.7
7.8
7.6
7.5
Specs Worx WG322 Black+Decker 40V MAX Husqvarna 120i Makita XCU03Z LXT Ryobi 40V RY40530
Model Number WG322 LCS1240 120i XCU03Z RY40503
Bar Length 10 inches 12 inches 14 inches 14 inches 14 inches
Measured Average Cutting Time 38.382 seconds 35.53 seconds 13.486 seconds 7.87 seconds 10.02 seconds
Measured Battery Charge Time 3 hr 3.6 hr 2 hrs 1 hr 2.75 hr
Measured Weight 6 lbs, 10 oz 8 lbs, 6 oz 10 lbs, 11 oz 11 lbs, 4 oz 11 lbs, 8 oz
Measured Battery Weight 1 lbs, 10 oz 1 lb, 5 oz 2 lbs, 12 oz 1 lb, 6 oz x 2 3 lbs, 2 oz
Measured Body Dimesions 13x8x7.5 inches 15x8.5x7 inches 19x7x7 inches 17x6x8 inches 19.5x9x8 inches
Included Battery Size 2 Ah 2 Ah 4.2 Ah 5 Ah 4 Ah
Nominal Voltage 20V 40V 36V 36V (2 x 18V) 40V
Measured Runtime 22 minutes 18 minutes 40 minutes 28 minutes 24 minutes
Measured Run Time Eco Mode n/a n/a 54 mins n/a n/a
Measured Wind Up Time 2 seconds 1.75 seconds .5 seconds .75 seconds 2 seconds
Measured Decibel Reading at 48in 80.0 dBa 83.3 dBa 85.9 dBa 105.7 dBa 97.8 dBa
Control Type Thumb safety Thumb safety Electronic button, side safety and brake Electronic button, palm safety, and chain brake Thumb safety
Chain Replacement and Tensioning Type Tool free Tool free Tool free Tool free Included Tool
Metal Bucking Spikes No No No Yes No
Oil Conservation 8 4 8 9 2
Bar & Chain Tank Location and Type Top Top, Screen Side, flip-up Side Top


Best Overall Battery Chainsaw


EGO Power+ CS2005


81
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Saw Performance 10.0
  • Ease of Use 8.0
  • Battery 7.0
  • Noise 5.0
  • Weight 4.4
REASONS TO BUY
Unsurpassed cutting speeds
Intuitive LCD display
Eco, medium, and boost modes
REASONS TO AVOID
One of the heaviest 20-inch saws
Chain tensioning takes a bit of time

Electric chainsaws traditionally lagged behind gas-powered models in cutting performance. But the EGO Power+ CS2005 rewrites the rules. This battery-powered chainsaw is the fastest we've ever tested, surpassing even our 20-inch gas chainsaws. It dominated our standardized 4x4 cutting tests and real-world use, with the added benefit of instant starts — no waiting for the engine to wind up. Plus, forget the hassle of choking or repeatedly pulling a starter cord on cold mornings. As our testers unanimously agreed, cutting with the CS2005 feels effortless, like gliding through butter. A convenient LCD display keeps you informed of battery life and selected mode (eco, medium, or boost).

The CS 2005's Achilles' heel is its weight. While comparable to a 20-inch gas-powered chainsaw, it outweighs the 18-inch battery models we tested by 4-5 pounds. This heft is noticeable. For limbing tasks, we often opted for the lighter Husqvarna Power Axe 350i (14.6 lbs) or the more value-oriented Ego Power+ CS1800. The Ego is significantly cheaper, lighter, and might be sufficient for your needs. Part of the weight increase comes from the hefty 6 Ah battery. Ego offers lighter 5.0 Ah and even 2.5 Ah options, but runtime and cutting speed will be impacted. The CS 2005 also uses a traditional chain tightening tool stored under the unit, a common feature on gas-powered saws that experienced users might prefer. However, those accustomed to the tool-less tightening on most battery chainsaws might find the CS 2005 initially more cumbersome. For extensive cutting sessions, a gas-powered chainsaw remains preferable due to battery limitations. Nonetheless, the CS 2005 significantly narrows the gap between gas and electric, potentially eliminating the need for gas for many users. If you can only have one chainsaw, this is a compelling option.

Read more: EGO Power+ CS2005 review

We combined our standard 4x4 cutting test for time with real-world use while clearing trails and collecting wood.
Credit: Chris McNamara

Best Bang for the Buck


Ego Power+ CS1800


Weight: 12.25 lbs | Body Dimensions: 16" x 9" x 8"
REASONS TO BUY
Top-notch performance
Long bar
LED lights
Affordable
Easy chain tensioning
REASONS TO AVOID
Slower wind-up time

The Ego Power+ CS1800 provides abundant power with a 56V 5Ah battery that charges fairly quickly. In side-by-side testing in the lab, it made some of the fastest cuts in our lineup, with only the CS2005 performing much better. It had an equally outstanding performance when we took it out into the real world for some mountain bike trail building. This chainsaw includes several features that serve overall ease of use and performance, including an LED light, metal bucking spikes, and an 18-inch bar. One of the most attractive elements of this model is the price tag. This is the one if you want a high-performance battery-powered chainsaw that costs substantially less than the others.

While we didn't find any dealbreakers with this model, it doesn't have the quickest wind-up time, which could be an issue if you're hoping to complete a job as fast as possible. Also, the bar's length might be more than is necessary for those with smaller projects to complete. Still, if you are looking for a budget-friendly battery chainsaw that is easy to use, with a long bar and a long-lasting battery, it is tough to beat the Ego Power+ CS1800. Suppose you want to occasionally supercharge your work for just a bit more out of pocket. In that case, you can pick up the Power Axe 350i and take advantage of its “boost mode,” which sends 25% more power to the motor once engaged - perfect for the occasional big job.

Read more: Ego Power+ CS1800 review

Our field test puts the chainsaw to the test! We'll rip through pine logs until the battery quits. We also show the easy-adjust chain tensioner and the powerful headlight.
Credit: Chris McNamara

Best for Quick Battery Charging


Greenworks Pro 80V


Weight: 15.13 lbs | Body Dimensions: 14" x 9" x 7.5"
REASONS TO BUY
Battery charges incredibly quickly
Long bar
Solid cutting performance
Includes metal bucking spikes
REASONS TO AVOID
Heavy
Relatively short run time
Uses a substantial amount of bar & chain oil

If you are a two-stroke fanatic and are worried about the charge time associated with cordless electric chainsaws, look no further than the Greenworks Pro 80V. The Greenworks 80 Volt Lithium Max charger juices the battery from zero to one hundred in an impressive thirty minutes, leaving you with less downtime than it takes to run to the gas station and mix another gallon of 50:1 fuel. We tested the 18-inch model and were happy to be able to buck large pine rounds without huffing exhaust fumes, yanking on a pull cord, or destroying our eardrums as we would have been with a two-stroke motor. The Pro 80V performed exceptionally well during our timed woodcutting assessment, cutting through Douglas Fir about as fast as any model we've ever used. The metal bucking spikes integrated into this model are far superior to the plastic nubs used by several battery chainsaws.

There's no getting around the fact that the Greenworks Pro 80V is downright heavy. Weighing over 15 pounds, this model will undoubtedly require more strength to wield than most cordless saws. Although the battery charges very quickly, it doesn't last as long as some of the other models on the market, so if battery life is a determining purchasing factor for you, it'd be wise to go with a different model. We noticed that the Pro 80V uses a fairly large amount of bar & chain oil, which isn't surprising considering the long bar coupled with the quick-cutting capabilities. Drawbacks aside, this saw is the best choice if you want a longer bar and don't want to wait all day for your battery to recharge. While no other top performer is going to cut your weight burden significantly nor compete with the remarkably quick recharge time on the Greenworks Pro, the similarly priced Power+ CS1800 by Ego does cut a few ounces overall. You'll gain double the amount of operable battery time in comparison. That is, assuming you can wait an extra hour for a recharge.

Read more: Greenworks Pro 80V review

battery chainsaw - the greenworks pro 80v easily tore through large pine logs at the...
The Greenworks Pro 80V easily tore through large pine logs at the job site.
Credit: Jason Peters

Best for Battery Expandability


Milwaukee M18 FUEL


71
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Saw Performance 7.5
  • Ease of Use 7.0
  • Battery 7.0
  • Noise 6.9
  • Weight 6.3
Weight: 14.25 lbs | Body Dimensions: 18.5 “ x 9” x 8"
REASONS TO BUY
Instantaneous wind-up
Metal bucking spikes
Many other tools use the same battery
REASONS TO AVOID
Expensive
Bulky
Uses a lot of bar & chain oil

The Milwaukee M18 Fuel is a beast of a chainsaw. It is one of the best at executing cuts and has a long-lasting battery. One of its best traits is that it goes from completely stopped to full speed instantly. This can be very useful when time and workflow efficiency are essential. With their M18 battery platform, Milwaukee supplies a massive lineup of tools for various applications. This well-known brand boasts more than 175 unique tools that use the same battery connection. If you own any Milwaukee cordless tools, you already have a battery or charger that will work with this battery chainsaw. If not, but you're interested in buying tools with interchangeable batteries, we recommend going with the Milwaukee line of products.

The Milwaukee M18 Fuel's main drawback is the incredibly loud and annoying noise it produces. One of the best things about electric tools compared to gasoline-powered machines is that they are much quieter. This one? Not so much. It is also pricey, especially compared to the budget models. Still, if you are already a Milwaukee power tool owner or if you need a chainsaw with quick wind-up, then the M18 Fuel is the way to go. Suppose you are not already invested in the Milwaukee brand. In that case, Husqvarna also makes a series of high-performing electric tools with an interchangeable battery, and the Power Axe 350i was among our overall top favorites in this lineup across all metrics, including noise. It also sells for substantially less.

Read more: Milwaukee M18 Fuel review

battery chainsaw - the milwaukee m18 fuel was one of the fastest during our dimensional...
The Milwaukee M18 Fuel was one of the fastest during our dimensional cutting tests.
Credit: Michelle Powell

Best 20V Model


Worx WG322


59
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Saw Performance 5.5
  • Ease of Use 7.0
  • Battery 4.0
  • Noise 7.9
  • Weight 9.4
Weight: 6.63 lbs | Body Dimensions: 13" x 8" x 7.5"
REASONS TO BUY
Light
Very quiet
Small
Budget-friendly
REASONS TO AVOID
Unimpressive battery life
So-so performance

The Worx WG322 has many attractive elements that the competition does not offer. Not everyone needs a colossal saw with a sizeable, clunky battery. The 20V battery used on this model is significantly lighter and smaller than the ones used by most saws, which range from 36V up to 80V. A significantly reduced weight, coupled with its 10-inch bar and smaller body size, allows the sawyer to easily tote, lift, and operate the WG322. This model is also quiet, which is ideal for residential or workshop settings. Finally, it is affordable. These tools can get very pricey — if you don't need the extra bar length, battery life, and power, then there's no need to drop the extra cash on a super high-performance model.

Along with the advantages brings a few drawbacks. The 20V battery life is quite a bit shorter than most higher-voltage models. Also, the WG322 can't hang with the best in overall cutting performance. It's a bit slower and less powerful than top-tier saws, and its shorter bar limits the diameter of cuts it can make. Despite these flaws, the Worx takes the cake for 20V battery chainsaws. Or, for just four pounds more to carry, you can pick up the similarly powerful Husqvarna 120i and enjoy double the run time with one less hour required to recharge.

Read more: Worx WG322 review

battery chainsaw - the worx wg322 is a great choice for a lightweight and maneuverable...
The Worx WG322 is a great choice for a lightweight and maneuverable 20V chainsaw with a small bar.
Credit: Laura Casner

Compare Products

select up to 5 products to compare
Score Product Price
81
EGO Power+ CS2005
Best Overall Battery Chainsaw
$600
Editors' Choice Award
80
Ego Power+ CS1800
$399
Best Buy Award
80
Husqvarna Power Axe 350i
$450
74
Greenworks Pro 80V
$400
Top Pick Award
71
Milwaukee M18 FUEL
Best for Battery Expandability
$600
Top Pick Award
71
Ego Power+ CS1613
$299
65
Husqvarna 120i
$290
63
Ego Power+ CS1400
$250
62
Makita XCU03Z LXT
$390
60
Greenworks G-MAX 40V
$250
59
Worx WG322
Best 20V Model
$130
Top Pick Award
50
Ryobi 40V RY40530
$240
49
Black+Decker 40V MAX
$275

battery chainsaw - the greenworks pro 80v is one of the quickest saws to recharge...
The Greenworks Pro 80V is one of the quickest saws to recharge, leaving you more time to be productive on your projects.
Credit: Jason Peters

How We Test Battery Chainsaws


At GearLab, we purchase all of our test products at everyday prices from typical retailers to reduce bias in our reviews. We began by carefully inspecting each saw for subtle nuances in the design of each model. We then measured and weighed each model to verify the manufacturers' claims. Next, we sliced a ton of wood up to time cuts and measured each saw's performance. We also timed how long each battery lasted and how long it took each one to recharge. Finally, to confirm our accuracy, we took our fleet of battery chainsaws to a local tree service's wood yard for some consultation. We let the crew get a feel for each saw and make some cuts to get input from the true professionals. Finally, we loaned these saws to a local trail organization and got their impressions on how effectively these trees cleared downed trees across trails. Learn more about how we test battery chainsaws.

Our battery chainsaw testing is divided into four rating metrics:
  • Saw Performance (35% of overall score weighting)
  • Ease of Use (30% weighting)
  • Battery Life (25% weighting)
  • Noise (10% weighting)

Why Trust GearLab


Our review editor Ross Patton has spent hundreds of hours with a saw in his hand cutting, trimming, and bucking all types of trees while working for the largest tree service in Northern Nevada, from the oak in the foothills of California to the pines of Lake Tahoe, and the elms and cottonwoods of Northern Nevada. With a formal education in environmental science from the University of Nevada, Reno, and a decade of work in product research and development garnered in the Ski and Snowboard industry, you can rest easy knowing that he has created objective tests to compare each saw as accurately as possible. He gets support from Chris McNamara, who has been using electric chainsaws for trail clearing and ranch work over the last decade. While Chris doesn't have all of Ross's chops (or cuts), chainsaws are one of his main passions in the summer (in the winter, it is the quest for the best snow shovel).

battery chainsaw - we spent weeks conducting side-by-side tests for these products.
We spent weeks conducting side-by-side tests for these products.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

How to Pick the Best Battery Chainsaw


The two most important considerations when selecting a battery chainsaw are the size of the chainsaw and the battery system.

Which Bar Length to Get?


The bar, sometimes called “the blade,” is the metal part that holds the chain. The length is measured from the bar's tip to where it meets the chainsaw body. Choose a bar that is a few inches longer than the most common cut size you will make. For example, if you are mainly cutting 12-inch pieces of wood, we would get a 16 or 18-inch bar. While technically, you could cut a 12-inch tree with a six-inch bar by making one cut on each side, it is not efficient to do that, and you are much more likely to get your chainsaw stuck. If you're only cutting small tree limbs, a 10 to 14-inch chainsaw is usually more than enough. And that smaller size is much easier to maneuver and faster to sharpen on the flipside; if you're cutting many larger trees, we recommend getting the largest electric chainsaw you can. We saw a big difference in the cutting efficiency between the 18-inch chainsaws and the 14 and 16-inch chainsaws.

Which Battery System Do You Already Have (Or Expect to Have)?


If you only need a battery chainsaw and no other yard tools like a leaf blower or a string trimmer, buy the best or highest-value chainsaw. However, most people want to own various yard tools with the same battery system. In that common case, it's important to consider the quality of the other tools. For example, Ego makes several high-quality and affordable tools like leaf blowers, lawnmowers, and even snowblowers, while Ego chainsaws didn't score at the very top of our ratings. They do a really good job, and it's a lot more convenient to add a couple more Ego and bare tools and not need to get an entirely new battery system and more batteries. Every chainsaw brand that we tested has other tools in its lineup. However, many brands have a much more limited lineup, such as only having leaf blowers and string trimmers, whereas other brands have a wide variety of tools, from portable power generators to lighting systems, snowblowers, and lawnmowers. It's expensive to switch once you commit to one battery brand.

Runtime: How Many Cuts Do You Need to Make?


Consider how many cuts you must make in your most common chainsaw projects. It's nice to make all those cuts with one battery without swapping it out. That saves you time on having to buy more batteries or saves you the hours it takes to wait for your battery to charge. Look at both our specs for measured runtime and how long it takes to charge each battery. Also, look at the battery size that comes with your saw. We generally prefer to err on the side of selecting a larger battery. They often cut faster, especially when fully charged, and we avoid constantly swapping batteries. Learn more in our full chainsaw buying advice article.

battery chainsaw - batteries are one of the biggest cost differentiators with battery...
Batteries are one of the biggest cost differentiators with battery chainsaws.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

Analysis and Test Results


Our goal is to help you decide which battery chainsaw is right for you, so we started with the most obvious way to test—we cut a whole lot of wood. However, to test these awesome tools side-by-side, we went well beyond just the saw performance. Over a month, we measured, weighed, timed, and noted more than a dozen variables on each one of these models.


Value


The most important factor to consider when searching for a battery chainsaw is its primary application. These devices are available in a wide price range, and a higher price does not imply that a saw will function effectively for your intended usage. Battery sizes should also be considered; some chainsaws may appear pricey but compensate with a larger battery.

If you're on a tighter budget, the Ego Power+ CS1800 is far from the costliest saw in our review, but it outperformed most of the competition in several key ways. It is still a great and capable tool that will likely satisfy regular homeownership and tree care demands. It's a great compromise between good performance and a reasonable price tag. Furthermore, if you rarely need to make serious cuts and are searching for an alternative to a big, heavy saw, then the Worx WG322 might satisfy your needs with an even smaller buy-in. It is more limited in saw performance and battery power, but these factors might not be as important to you as sticking to a budget.

battery chainsaw - the husqvarna chainsaw offers exceptional value, providing high...
The Husqvarna chainsaw offers exceptional value, providing high performance without breaking the bank.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

Saw Performance


Saw performance is of the highest importance with these machines. To test this, we took the average of several timed cuts through a specific dimension of wood from the lumber yard to ensure that each saw was tearing through the exact same volume for each cut. For the second part of this metric, we took our fleet of saws to a commercial wood yard for a more subjective test to see how they functioned bucking rounds of pine. We closely monitored how quickly the saws went through bar and chain oil during these two tests. We also timed how long each saw took from stopped to full speed. We call this number “wind-up” time. Lastly, we considered bar length in this metric, as a smaller bar cannot complete larger tasks.

Running a chainsaw without bar or chain oil can cause friction and create heat that can damage your saw severely.


The undisputed king of this contest is the EGO Power+ CS2005. This saw's wind-up time is non-existent, and it uses oil at a much slower rate than the majority of the competition. When it came to timing cuts, it smashed the all-time GearLab record with a fastest time of 3.25 seconds and an average of 3.45 seconds.


When we took the EGO Power+ CS2005 into the forest for some real-world testing, our team was blown away by the smooth, quick work done by this saw. The longer bar means less bending at the waist for logs on the ground and the ability to tackle larger diameters with ease.

It's a record! The EGO Power+ CS2005 put up the fastest single cut time that we've ever seen.
Credit: Ross Patton

The next highest-scoring model in this portion of our assessment is the Husqvarna Power Axe 350i. In its standard mode, it put up an average time of 7.07 seconds. When “boost mode” is enabled, its fastest time drops down to an incredible 5.13. It also has a nearly instantaneous wind-up time of .25 seconds. Not only did this model do fantastically well in our time trials, but our team of professional tree service employees found it to have an overall comfortable feel while cutting.

The Husqvarna Power Axe 350i is a powerful cordless chainsaw. In regular mode, it's already one of the fastest on the market. But when you activate “Boost Mode,” the motor kicks into an even higher gear for tackling tough cuts.
Credit: Ross Patton

The Ego Power+ CS1800 and the Greenworks Pro 80V were just behind the 350i for this metric. During our dimensional woodcutting tests, the Greenworks Pro 18V showed an average cutting time of 5.3 seconds, while the CS1800 put up a time of 5.9 seconds.

The Makita XCU03Z LXT displayed cutting times ever so slightly slower, with an average of 7.9 seconds. At 0.75 seconds, it also has a respectable wind-up time. Our favorite part about this saw is that we found that the LXT easily turned pine to sawdust in the woodyard. It has an innovative adjustable oil pump, so you can change the feed rate depending on the air temperature and the type of oil you are using. For any sawyer doing a lot of firewood bucking, the Makita comes with metal bucking spikes to make the job easier.

Bucking spikes are spikes that face forward on either or both sides of the bar that are used to aid in leverage when making cuts through thicker rounds of wood.

battery chainsaw - the makita easily slices through logs that are nearly the diameter...
The Makita easily slices through logs that are nearly the diameter of its bar length.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

Waiting for a saw to wind up can cost you time and energy, which in some circumstances can also mean you're losing money. The Milwaukee M18 Fuel exhibited an instantaneous wind-up during all of our tests. The M18 Fuel had a great average cutting time of 8.3 seconds in our lab test and also dissected logs like nothing during our field tests. The Milwaukee is another model with metal bucking spikes to help get the job done faster. However, it goes through more bar and chain oil than we'd like.

battery chainsaw - the metal bucking spikes on the milwaukee m18 fuel are great for...
The metal bucking spikes on the Milwaukee M18 Fuel are great for digging into logs for extra leverage.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

The Ego Power+ 1400, on the other hand, went through almost no bar & chain oil during our tests and had sufficient cutting power with an average time of 9.5 seconds during the lab tests. This saw is one of the slowest to react to a fully pulled trigger and took 2.5 seconds to get up to speed. We docked it a little bit for this slow wind-up time.

The Power+ 1400's larger cousin, the Ego Power+ CS1613, showed an impressive average cutting time of 7.21 seconds with a wind-up time of 0.5 seconds, which we attribute to the fact that it has a 4 Ah battery compared to the 1400's 2 Ah.

battery chainsaw - the ego power+ cs1613 cuts relatively quickly and has a quick...
The EGO Power+ CS1613 cuts relatively quickly and has a quick wind-up time.
Credit: Ross Patton

The Worx WG322 had an okay wind-up time of 2 seconds and a rather slow average cutting time of 38 seconds, but taking into account the 20V battery and 10-inch bar, we were pleasantly surprised to see this thing ripping it up in the woodlot. Don't let the lightweight and compact size fool you; this tool is not a toy and is well-suited for many chainsaw uses.

battery chainsaw - the worx wg322 was once of the slowest in our controlled tests but...
The Worx WG322 was once of the slowest in our controlled tests but performs fantastically for many smaller homeowner projects.
Credit: Ross Patton

Ease of Use


One of the best things about battery chainsaws is their ease of use compared to gas-powered chainsaws, which is why this metric contributes 30% to the total score. Cordless saws, however, are not all created equal. To establish the scores for this metric, we used a panel of judges to decide which saws had the best balance, were the most comfortable to hold, and were the easiest to turn on and off. We also removed and reinstalled the chain on each saw several times to gauge how difficult or technical the various tensioning systems are to operate. We then noted how difficult each battery was to attach or remove from the saw. We paid close attention to how difficult it was to slide the bar cover off or back on and how well they actually protect the chain. Finally, we noted the location of the bar & chain oil tank, the type of cap each tank has, and how difficult these tanks are to fill.


When it comes to ease of use, three EGO Models — the CS2005, CS1800, and CS1613, along with the Husqvarna Power Axe 350i are tied at the top of the list. Among the various types of controls that chainsaws have, our consensus is that simpler is better. The EGO models have the system that we like the most, with a simple thumb safety switch and a chain brake. It's the least complicated to use and the fastest to go from storage to slicing and dicing.

The EGO Power+ CS2005 has an integrated digital display that shows which power level you have selected and if you have the working lights enabled. If those features weren't fancy enough, it even has high and low beam settings for the lights.

The digital display shows whether you are on Turbo, medium, or “ECO” mode. The screen also indicates the battery level and headlight mode.
Credit: Chris McNamara

While the CS2005 earned some bonus points for a few of its bells and whistles, the old-school “scrench” chain system balances it out. This model takes a few seconds longer to tension or change the chain than tool-free models. However, it is worth mentioning that many seasoned sawyers prefer the tightness and precision offered by this system over the recent innovations used by various chainsaw manufacturers.

If you decide to use the CS2005, be prepared to learn the old-fashioned method of changing and tensioning the bar and chain.
Credit: Chris McNamara

The 16" and 18" EGO models have an easy-to-use tool-free chain tensioning system. You simply turn the wheel clockwise to tension the chain and counterclockwise to lock it in place. This model also has an LED light for use from dusk 'til dawn.

The CS1800 has LED lights with the button conveniently located on...
The CS1800 has LED lights with the button conveniently located on top of the saw body.
The Ego Power+ CS1800 has one of the most easily adjustable and...
The Ego Power+ CS1800 has one of the most easily adjustable and changeable chains that we've seen.
The Ego Power+ CS1613 has a thumb safety and a throttle trigger...
The Ego Power+ CS1613 has a thumb safety and a throttle trigger. Besides the chain brake, that's it for controls.

The Husqvarna Power Axe 350i is very intuitive to use. To power the saw on, you press a conveniently-located power button and then press the palm safety and pull the trigger. The palm safety cannot be pressed until you slide it forward — a feature that we found helped reduce the chances of accidentally engaging the saw but doesn't add to the overall time and effort of getting it going.

The Power Axe 350i has one of the most intuitive on-and-off buttons that adds an extra step to engaging the saw.
Credit: Ross Patton

The 350i's chain tensioning system is also one of our favorites. A lever folds out of the side of the saw to help give you some extra twisting power for the main dial. Once this dial is loosened, you turn a small wheel to tension the chain and then crank the dial back down to lock it in.

battery chainsaw - the power axe has one of the easier chain tensioning systems. it is...
The Power Axe has one of the easier chain tensioning systems. It is almost as fast and easy as the Ego system.
Credit: Ross Patton

Close behind the top-scoring models for this metric are the Milwaukee M18 Fuel and Worx WG322. The Milwaukee bears nearly all of the features that we appreciate for simple use, except the battery lacks a handy loop, and its bar cover does not clip to the saw body. In general, this saw is very easy to use.

One area where the Milwaukee may lose a little appeal to some people is the weight. This is among the heaviest saws we have tested, tipping the scales at 14.25 pounds. Although we did not find the weight to be a huge influence on the user-friendliness of the various saws, we did dock the scores of heavier models for users that might struggle to lift those few extra pounds.

Another saw that uses the simple thumb safety & trigger system is the Worx WG322, which also features a tool-free bar mounting and chain tensioning system. We like the way the system operates, but we noticed that you have to keep a closer eye on the chain than with the Ego CS1800. The majority of the remaining models scored just above average for this metric.

battery chainsaw - the worx wg322 stands out as one of the easiest tensioning systems...
The Worx WG322 stands out as one of the easiest tensioning systems we have tested.
Credit: Ross Patton

Similar to the top-tier models, the Ego Power+ CS1613 and the Ego Power+ 1400 have a simple control system that we like composed of nothing more than a thumb safety and a throttle. We appreciate that Ego stepped their oil cap up to a flip-out lever on the CS1613, an improvement from previous models' standard caps.

battery chainsaw - the ego power+ 1613 has a fold-out cap that you can operate while...
The EGO Power+ 1613 has a fold-out cap that you can operate while wearing gloves.
Credit: Ross Patton

The Black+Decker 40V MAX has the simple-to-use control system that we like, which consists of a thumb safety and the standard trigger. The oil tank cap is located on the top of the saw body, which is convenient, but unlike the Power+ 1400, the Black+Decker model goes through a lot of bar & chain oil, so you end up dealing with the cap often while operating the saw. Also, the tool-free tensioning system on this saw is a bit troublesome to get the chain to proper tension or change the chain out. The one performance aspect where the Black+Decker is at the top of the field is its weight. At 8.4 pounds, it is more than 2 pounds lighter than any other model.

battery chainsaw - the black+decker oil cap is located on the top of the saw body for...
The Black+Decker oil cap is located on the top of the saw body for maximum convenience.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

Unlike the aforementioned saws, the Greenworks G-MAX 40V, Greenworks Pro 80V, and the Husqvarna 120i all have an electronic button that needs to be engaged before the safety switch, the chain brake, or the trigger will turn the chainsaw on. We feel this is a bit excessive, considering that there are already three different mechanisms in place that all must be in the proper position for the saw to start. It can get annoying when you have positioned yourself to make a cut, and then you pull the trigger only to realize that you have forgotten a redundant step.

battery chainsaw - we find electronic power buttons to be a redundant feature when...
We find electronic power buttons to be a redundant feature when there's already a chain brake, safety switch, and trigger on most models.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

The G-MAX, Pro 80V, and the 120i house the battery compartment on top of the saw body, which we think is the most convenient and ergonomic. The tool-free chain tensioning system still isn't the easiest design to use on either of these models. At 10.7 pounds, the Husqvarna is one of the lightest chainsaws in our review.

battery chainsaw - top-mounted battery compartments on the saw allow for quick and easy...
Top-mounted battery compartments on the saw allow for quick and easy battery changes.
Credit: Jason Peters

Battery


Before making the conversion to cordless, most die-hard gas-powered chainsaw enthusiasts are skeptical about the battery life. And not without reason. Because battery life varied significantly among the saws we tested, we weighted this metric at 25% of our overall score. The battery examination included two specific tests: how long the batteries ran at full power with no resistance and how long it took to charge the batteries. We weighted our results slightly more heavily toward battery life than charge time, although we know that charge time is still crucial to many people.


If battery life is your key deciding factor while shopping for a battery chainsaw, look no further than the Ego Power+ CS1800. This model lasted an entire 60 minutes during our runtime assessment. Surprisingly, even with its extra-long runtime, it only took an hour and a half to charge.

battery chainsaw - the newer ego models have a battery level indicator located on the...
The newer EGO models have a battery level indicator located on the battery itself.
Credit: Ross Patton

Just behind the top-scoring models in this assessment is the Husqvarna 120i, which has two different settings — normal mode and an additional “savE” mode, which reduces the chain speed to save battery during lighter jobs that require less power cutting power. In normal mode, the Husqvarna is already ahead of the field with a run time of 40 minutes, but once switched to “savE” mode, it lasts even longer with a measured time of 54 minutes. With a charge time measured at 2 hours, the 120i wasn't the quickest in this aspect, but it also isn't anywhere near the slowest.

battery chainsaw - to measure runtime we secured the saws to a workbench and held the...
To measure runtime we secured the saws to a workbench and held the triggers with utility clips.
Credit: Michelle Powell

The Husqvarna Power Axe 350i had a fantastic runtime of 51 minutes, but we had to dock it a point for this metric because it takes a whopping 2 hours and 45 minutes to charge.

battery chainsaw - the husqvarna power axe 350i runs for a long time, but it takes an...
The Husqvarna Power Axe 350i runs for a long time, but it takes an unusually long time to recharge.
Credit: Ross Patton

The biggest, most powerful model in our lineup, the EGO Power+ CS2005, didn't have the longest runtime at 35 minutes with no load other than the chain on the motor. Where this saw earned its points for this metric is its charge time — At 1 hour and 15 minutes from completely dead to 100%, the CS2005 both lasts longer and charges faster than many of the competitors while offering a lot more power.

EGO's latest charger juices up the massive 56-volt 6Ah battery impressively quickly.
Credit: Chris McNamara

The Greenworks Pro 80V had a solid runtime of 27 minutes during our assessment, which is far from the longest-running models. However, where the Pro 80V really shines is its charge time — the Greenworks rapid charger is able to bring the massive 80-volt battery up to 100% in a lightning-fast 30 minutes.

battery chainsaw - power through your projects with minimal interruptions. the large...
Power through your projects with minimal interruptions. The large Greenworks battery recharges in a quick 30 minutes.
Credit: Jason Peters

The Milwaukee exhibited a runtime of 33 minutes and took 1 hour and 20 minutes to get back to full charge.


The Ego Power+ 1400 has a decent run time of 24 minutes and a very impressive charge time of only 45 minutes. Its slightly larger cousin, the Ego Power+ CS1613, had nearly identical runtime and charge times. With a charge time of 1 hour and a run time of 28 minutes, the Makita XLT also hovers around the middle of the pack for battery life.


The Ryobi 40V and the Worx WG322's charge times range between 2 hours and 45 minutes and 3 hours. Considering that the Ryobi's run time is 24 minutes and the WG322's only 22 minutes, if you buy either of these saws, you will be spending a lot more time watching the charger than making cuts. That said, it should be noted that the Worx battery is the only 20-volt battery-powered tool we tested, and it is not intended to be a long-running tool.

battery chainsaw - battery charge times varied significantly across the models we tested.
Battery charge times varied significantly across the models we tested.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

Noise


One of the main ways that battery chainsaws are superior to gas-powered models is that they are much quieter. Many manufacturers use this fact to entice people to buy battery-powered saws, so we decided to make this our final metric. However, because all chainsaws are inherently loud due to the spinning of the chain and the tearing of cutting wood, we only weighted it 10% of the total score. To measure sound, we used a sound level meter at a distance of 48 inches from the chain with the saw at full throttle. Our testers also paid close attention to whether or not certain saws subjectively stood out as being unpleasant to use while cutting due to excess noise. Because these are largely considered to be consumer models, we also wanted to consider how much the sound produced by the tools might bother your neighbors. To gauge this, we used a panel of judges at a distance of 50 feet from the saws to get some opinions on whether or not any of the tools were particularly aggravating to listen to.


The quietest model in our review is the Worx WG322. During our SPL meter tests from a distance of 4 feet, we measured a mere 80 decibels. Our panel of judges had nothing to complain about the pitch or tone emitted from this tool. Shockingly, one of the most powerful models is also one of the quietest — The Husqvarna Power Axe 350i only emits 82.1 decibels at full throttle.


Just short of the Worx WG322 and the Husqvarna Power Axe 350i for this metric are the Black+Decker 40V MAX and the Greenworks G-MAX. During our sound meter reading test, the MAX only registered 83.3 decibels, which is the lowest of any of the saws that we reviewed. We'd say this model is quiet and only slightly whiny. The G-MAX produced 83.8 decibels, barely more than the MAX, and it's only moderately whiny.

battery chainsaw - the black+decker hardly emits noise when compared to other models...
The Black+Decker hardly emits noise when compared to other models tested.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

Scoring just below the quietest saws are the Ego Power+ 1400 and the Husqvarna 120i. During our sound meter test, we recorded 85.3 decibels for the Power+, and the 120i was slightly louder. We found that the Ego Power+ 1400 isn't especially whiny and that the 120i has no whine.

battery chainsaw - we used a sound meter to take decibel readings for each saw at a...
We used a sound meter to take decibel readings for each saw at a given distance.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

While the noise pitch of the Makita LXT wasn't quite to the annoying level, the sound meter told a different tale. Anyone operating this saw will be subjected to a head-splitting 105.7 decibels.

battery chainsaw - some of the top contenders in our chainsaw testing, ready for action.
Some of the top contenders in our chainsaw testing, ready for action.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

Weight


How much a chainsaw weighs may be a critical factor for some people, while others might not care at all. If you're tackling tasks that require you to cut at or above your waist, it'd be wise to go with a lighter model. On the other hand, gravity can be your friend. If you're going to be spending the day dicing logs into firewood lengths, it's nice to let the weight of the saw do some of the work once it is in the cutting position.


Conclusion


We hope our review gives you the insight and the certainty to make the right choice for the best battery chainsaw for you. Just as every person has a different application for their chainsaw, and every chainsaw has its strengths, weaknesses, and features. Have fun out there, and be safe.

Ross Patton and Chris McNamara