The Best Food Processors of 2017

The Breville Sous Chef 16 Pro  our Editors' Choice award winner.
After spending over 160 hours testing the 10 best food processors available on the market today, we knew without a doubt which models were a cut above the rest and which ones were on the chopping block. We chopped almonds, sliced tomatoes, shredded carrots, mixed pie crust, and pureed hummus to help you find the perfect appliance, whether you are looking for a high-end, top of the line model that is truly the best of the best of a solid value option on a budget. Keep reading to find out which food processor reigned supreme in the kitchen and which one is the best bang for the buck.

Read the full review below >

Test Results and Ratings

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Analysis and Award Winners


Review by:
David Wise and Austin Palmer

Last Updated:
Monday
July 17, 2017

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Updated July 2017
We have been keeping a close watch for any new food processors that are a cut above our current award winners and have yet to find one. All of our current award winners are still very well-regarded, topping best seller lists without major complaints from users. We still strongly stand by the following models as the best food processors on the market today that you can get for overall performance and for the money. We'll continue to keep a sharp eye out for anything new, but for now, the appliances below are still the best you can get.

Best Overall Food Processor


Breville Sous Chef 16 Pro


The Breville Sous Chef 16 Pro. Editors' Choice Award

$379.95
at Amazon
See It

Evenly chopped food
Easy to clean
Great at shredding
Expensive

Taking home the top score of the entire group, the Sous Chef 16 Pro by Breville earned an Editors' Choice award and the undisputed title of Best Overall Food Processor. This top chopper received the best score in the majority of our testing metrics: chopping, mixing, shredding, and was one of the least difficult models to clean. The food processor created exceptionally consistent chopped onions and carrots, mixed up various types of dough with ease, and achieved perfection when shredding cheese. While this model is a little on the expensive side, it's the best that you can get on the market today and is the best option for those looking for performance when shopping for a new processor.

Read full review: Breville Sous Chef 16 Pro

Best Bang For The Buck


Cuisinart Custom 14


The Cuisinart Custom 14. Best Buy Award

$180.00
at Amazon
See It

Great at pureeing
Solid slicing skills
No slicing adjustment without buying more discs
No shredding adjustment without buying more discs

Searching to save some cash? The Custom 14 by Cuisinart earned the runner-up position in our review, only bested by the Breville. However, it has a list price that is less than half of what the Breville costs, earning it our Best Buy award. This model is a solid, all-around food processor that creates uniform slices of tomatoes, purees very consistent and uniform hummus, and can shred and chop right up there with the best models — all without slicing and dicing your bank account. This model does require you to purchase additional blades for varying the shredding or slicing thickness, so that can increase the cost.

Read full review: Cuisinart Custom 14

Best On A Tight Budget


Hamilton Beach 10-Cup


The Hamilton Beach 10-Cup. Best Buy Award

$36.85
at Amazon
See It

Inexpensive
Best at Pureeing
Struggles at mixing
Leaks horribly when used with liquids
Loud

Trying to get a food processor on the slimmest of budgets? The Hamilton Beach 10-Cup is the best way to stretch your dollar, offering a decent performance at a fraction of the cost of our two prior award winners. It delivered a solid performance across the board, even surprising us by taking home the top score in our pureeing metric for its consistently consistent hummus. It created relatively uniform pieces when it came to chopping food, slices that didn't vary too much when it came to thickness, and — most importantly — won't slash your budget to ribbons. However, this model didn't seal at all when filled with liquids, leaking terribly and creating a gigantic mess. This model also struggled significantly when mixing the dough, to the point where we felt that it was not long for this world if we continued to use it to make pizza dough or pie crust. In spite of those drawbacks, this model is still a fantastic value and it our top recommendation for those shopping on a tight budget and want to save as much cash as possible.

Read full review: Hamilton Beach 10-Cup

select up to 5 products
Score Product Price Our Take
81
$570
Editors' Choice Award
The best of the best, though you have to pay for it
66
$200
Best Buy Award
This is the best food processor you can get shopping on a budget, while not sacrificing too much performance.
63
$200
A great food processor for everything but slicing
63
$700
A large, expensive model that didn't perform relative to its price
62
$50
Best Buy Award
The best for those trying to save some dough but not the best at mixing it.
62
$180
A solid, middle of the road food processor that works fine as long as you aren't running it for too long
62
$200
Great if you are planning on frequently making dough or mayo
62
$300
A costly, average food processor that is exceptional at slicing
50
$250
A pricey food processor that performed poorly
46
$40
The least expensive and lowest scoring model of the group

Analysis and Test Results


We spent two months pushing the limits of the 10 best food processors out there to see which models came out on top. We conducted close to 25 distinct tests throughout this review. grouped into six weighted metrics: chopping, shredding, slicing, mixing, pureeing, and cleaning. The aggregated performance in these areas determined the overall score, ranging from 0-100.

Our tests ranged from chopping onions to checking if the bowls leaked to determine which models were worthy of awards and which ones not so much. We recommend that you focus on the metrics that most closely match your intended use, and select a machine that excels in those areas. These are multi-purpose machines, and while we gave awards to the top overall machines, you may be better served by a model that excels in the particular metric that is most of interest to you. The sections below give a detailed breakdown of how each food processor compared to its peers.

We chopped two  quartered onions in each model and compared the results.
We chopped two, quartered onions in each model and compared the results.

Chopping


Chopping food is a quintessential task for these appliances, and should be the bread and butter of any food processor worth its salt. We compared the performance of each processor at chopping onions, carrots, nuts by comparing the quality of the finished products. We also awarded points if the machine had a "Pulse" button, and for how well it worked — whether or not it stopped quickly upon the release of the button, thus determining how precisely you can control the appliance. You can see in the chart below how the contenders stacked up, and which models were a cut above the rest.


The Breville Sous Chef was the cream of the crop for this metric, meriting a 9 out of 10. This model did exceptionally well at chopping onions and almonds. This model took four pulses to reduce two quartered onions to a uniform size.

The results of our onion chopping test. We were looking for the most uniform chopped onions that weren't mush.
The results of our onion chopping test. We were looking for the most uniform chopped onions that weren't mush.

The almonds were quickly reduced to an appropriate size, without pulverizing them. The Breville's "Pulse" button stopped quickly, but there were other models like the Cuisinart Elite that stopped immediately. The Breville still did a great job at chopping carrots, but ranked second best, beat out by the Hamilton Beach 10-Cup, as it had fewer large, uneven chunks.

Following the Breville, there was a three-way tie for the runner-up position, with the Braun Tribute Collection, the KitchenAid Pro Line, and the Hamilton Beach 10-Cup all earning a 7 out of 10. Both the KitchenAid Pro and the Hamilton Beach 10-Cup stopped immediately upon release of the "Pulse" button, while the Braun took a slight pause before it ceased spinning. The Braun did do an exceptional job at chopping the almonds, coming in a close second to the Breville in terms of quality of chopped nuts. The Braun did well at chopping onions and carrots, but fell off slightly on chopping carrots, leaving more unevenly sized pieces of carrot than the Hamilton Beach 10-Cup.

The Hamilton Beach 10-Cup and the Braun produced comparable chopped onions, but both were beaten by the KitchenAid Pro Line. This model just barely got beat out by the Breville for being the best at chopping onions. It also produced reasonably chopped carrots, though it took more pulses than the other models.

The KitchenAid Pro Line did a very good job at chopping carrots.
The KitchenAid Pro Line did a very good job at chopping carrots.

However, the KitchenAid Pro did an average job at chopping almonds, creating a ton of dust in the process, but did substantially better than the Hamilton Beach 10-Cup, which was the worst out of the bunch in our chopped almond test. TheHamilton Beach 10-Cup left tons of whole almonds, and took a very, very long time to reach something resembling the Breville, but produced tons of pulverized almond dust in the process.

Following behind these frontrunners were the Cuisinart Elite, Cuisinart Custom, and the KitchenAid 9-Cup, all earning a 6 out of 10. All three of these models stopped immediately when the "Pulse" button was released. However, these three models had wildly different performance when it came to chopping onions, carrots, and almonds. While this pair of Cuisinart's did average at chopping onions, the KitchenAid 9-Cup excelled, leaving a uniform mix with only a handful of undesirably large pieces. The tables were turned when it came to chopping almonds, with both the Cuisinart Elite and the Cuisinart Custom chopping the almonds a satisfactory amount, but the KitchenAid 9-Cup doing a terrible job. This model was one of the worst, leaving tons of whole almonds and repeatedly walking down the table while chopping.

Next were the Cuisinart Elemental 13-Cup and the BLACK+DECKER 8-Cup, both earning a 5 out of 10 for their average chopping abilities. The Cuisinart Elemental excelled at chopping onions, producing almost the identical level of uniformity as the Breville, but taking double the number of pulses. This model fell a little short when it came to carrots, producing some of the most poorly chopped carrots of the group, with lots of whole pieces still intact. This was a stark contrast to the BLACK+DECKER which left multiple large chunks of onions, with a wide range of sizes, but did really well in our test at chopping carrots, producing a large, even chop — though it did take about 12 pulses.

The evenly chopped carrots produced by the BLACK+DECKER.
The evenly chopped carrots produced by the BLACK+DECKER.

Both of these models didn't stop immediately when the "Pulse" button was released, with the Cuisinart Elemental taking a fraction of a second longer. These models were both mediocre at chopping almonds, leaving a handful of larger chunks and whole almonds, as well as creating a non-trivial amount of pulverized almond dust.

Finishing at the back of the pack in our chopping test, the Hamilton Beach Professional 14-Cup just didn't make the cut, earning a 4 out of 10. It did produce chopped onions that were acceptable, though they were a little on the mushy side, but this model fell short in all other chopping tests. This model spun for a long time after the "Pulse" button was released, and had some noticeable ramp up time. The Hamilton Beach Professional produced exceptionally large chunks when chopping carrots and created two distinct sizes of carrot pieces, rather than uniform.

The chopped carrots created by the Hamilton Beach Professional lacked uniformity  and were on the larger side.
The chopped carrots created by the Hamilton Beach Professional lacked uniformity, and were on the larger side.

It was when it came to chopping nuts that this model truly failed, creating the worst product of the bunch. It left an enormous portion of the almonds untouched, and only managed to produce primarily dust after a large number of pulses, never effectively chopping the nuts at all.

We were quite happy combining the results of the tomato sauce test  shredded cheese test   and the pizza dough test.
We were quite happy combining the results of the tomato sauce test, shredded cheese test, and the pizza dough test.

Mixing


While there is some authentic charm in mixing your family pie crust recipe by hand with a wooden spoon, it sure it a lot easier to have a food processor do the work for you. In addition to pie crust, we also made pizza dough and mayonnaise in each of these machines to determine which ones mixed with ease — and which ones might get beaten out by a wooden spoon. The graphic below shows the results of our mixing test.


Once again, the Breville Sous Chef 16 Pro stood out as the top performer, earning a 9 out of 10. This model successfully made the mayonnaise recipe we used for testing without catastrophe and created high-quality pizza dough and pie crust.

This burly food processor showed no sign of a struggle while mixing the pizza dough but did take a little more time to complete with its smaller dough blade. The Breville took five pulses to achieve the desired consistency of pie crust. The crust was high-quality and looked fantastic when we rolled it out — ready to become the perfect pie.

Lagging slightly behind the Breville, the Braun TributeCollection and the Cuisinart Elemental 13-Cup both earned an 8 out of 10. These models both made mayonnaise successfully without incident, but this pair weren't quite as solid as the Breville at producing pizza dough and pie crust.

The Braun vibrated like crazy when making the pizza dough — especially when the second cup of flour was added, much worse than the Cuisinart Elemental, which only shook a tiny bit. However, the Braun did make slightly better pie crust than the Elemental, which struggled at incorporating the last bit of flour, producing dough too sticky in some places and too dry in others.

The bulk of the mixers followed, with the BLACK+DECKER 8-Cup, Cuisinart Elite, Cuisinart Custom, KitchenAid 9-Cup, and the KitchenAid Pro Line all scoring a 6 out of 10. Only the two KitchenAid models easily mixed mayonnaise to perfection, with the other three models failing in varying degrees.

The KitchenAid Pro Line made mayo without any problems.
The KitchenAid Pro Line made mayo without any problems.

The Cuisinart Elite came the closest to succeeding, but it wasn't quite there. An expert user could probably pull off the 1-cup recipe in this food processor, but we weren't able to create a satisfactory result. Both the BLACK+DECKER and the Cuisinart Custom didn't even come close to mixing the ingredients in our 1-cup recipe. These models may work if the recipe was doubled or tripled.

The Cuisinart Custom did an excellent job at making pizza dough and was one of the fastest models, seemingly unaffected by its lack of dough blade. This was closely followed by the BLACK+DECKER which was hampered by it smaller mixing bowl. The ball of dough would flex the lid when it was rotating and the motor sounded like it was struggling, but the dough produced was high-quality — just slightly worse than the Breville, Cuisinart Custom, and Cuisinart Elemental and comparable to the Braun.

The Cuisinart Elite required intervention to continue mixing — the dough would stick on the lid and refuse to mix, requiring us to fold it down periodically. The KitchenAid 9-Cup shook a considerable amount when mixing and was walking around the table, but it did not shake quite as violently as the Braun. However, the motor sounded like it was noticeably struggling — considerably more than the BLACK+DECKER. The KitchenAid Pro Line was the worst of the bunch in our test, requiring us to finish incorporating the dry ingredients by hand, as the machine could not free them from the walls of the bowl and only produced a soupy mixture.

Moving on to pie crust, the BLACK+DECKER, Cuisinart Elite, Cuisinart Custom all produced above-average quality pie crust with only some minor issues. The Elite was prone to some side stickage, the BLACK+DECKER took substantially more pulses than the top models, and the Custom would shoot a small amount of flour out. Both KitchenAid models produced inferior pie crust by failing to incorporate all of the flour adequately, causing the dough to be too wet and exceptionally sticky.

Trailing behind the rest of the pack, the Hamilton Beach 10-Cup and the Hamilton Beach Professional 14-Cup earned a 5 and a 4 out of 10 respectively. The Hamilton Beach 10-Cup failed spectacularly when attempting to make mayonnaise, horrifically leaking and splattering everywhere.

The Hamilton Beach Professional failed our test but may have made mayonnaise successfully if you made an inordinate amount. This model didn't actually start mixing until over a half cup of oil had been added, giving you an idea of just how much you would need to make in one batch to get a successful pre-mix.

The blades weren't low enough in the bowl in this model to successfully make our 1-Cup mayo recipe.
The blades weren't low enough in the bowl in this model to successfully make our 1-Cup mayo recipe.

This pair redeemed themselves slightly at mixing pizza dough, both creating product that was comparable to the Cuisinart Elite and slightly worse than the BLACK+DECKER and the Braun. Both Hamilton Beach models did appear to be struggling for this test, with their motors sounding less than thrilled. The pair's performance differed when it came to mixing pie crust, with the Hamilton Beach 10-Cup doing much better than the Hamilton Beach Professional. The 10-Cup made very nice pie crust, comparable to the Cuisinart Custom. However, the Hamilton Beach 10-Cup shook violently, ejected a non-trivial amount of flour from the bowl, and had significant flour stuck on the lip of the bowl. The Hamilton Beach Professional suffered from similar problems but also took substantially more pulses to finish the pie crust — anywhere from 30-40 more pulses than any other model. The finished crust was good, but it was a struggle to get there. However, even with all of their shortcomings, both Hamilton Beach models still produced pie crust that was superior to that of the KitchenAid models.

One of the members of our tasting panel sampling the hummus to evaluate consistency and texture.
One of the members of our tasting panel sampling the hummus to evaluate consistency and texture.

Pureeing


We conducted five separate tests to evaluate the pureeing ability of these products, with equal weight being assigned to their scores for producing applesauce, tomato sauce, hummus, and nut butter. We also did a maximum fill line leak test with water, to see just how watertight these actually were, as finding out the hard way that your food processor mixing bowl doesn't seal quite as well as you thought is a sure-fire way to ruin your day. You can see how these products scored in the graph below.


In a surprise upset, the Cuisinart Custom and the Hamilton Beach 10-Cup merited the top score, both earning an 8 out of 10 and unseating the winner of the previous two metrics, the Breville. The Hamilton Beach 10-Cup was unanimously voted as tying for the smoothest hummus by a panel of tasters, with the Cuisinart Custom coming in a close second. The Hamilton Beach 10-Cup also created excellent nut butter, producing a satisfactory product after about 10 minutes, the top was wobbling like crazy throughout. The Cuisinart Custom took almost twice as long as the Hamilton Beach 10-Cup and the final product was definitely inferior.

Both of these models created perfect tomato sauce after about 30 seconds of pureeing, with the Custom receiving some bonus points as it was the least messy out of every model that we tested. This pair also produced some of the highest-quality applesauce out of the test, tying with the KitchenAid 9-Cup and the KitchenAid Pro Line.

There was a stark contrast when it came to the leak test, with the Cuisinart Custom doing substantially better than the Hamilton Beach 10-Cup. The Custom took about three and a quarter cups of water to reach its maximum fill line and didn't leak at all. The Hamilton Beach 10-Cup reached the maximum fill line with two and a half cups of water and when the motor was turned on promptly leaked horribly. Everywhere.

When filled to the maximum fill line with water  the Hamilton Beach 10-Cup leaked profusely.
When filled to the maximum fill line with water, the Hamilton Beach 10-Cup leaked profusely.

This model would have been the de facto top scorer for pureeing, had it not leaked so horribly — dropping it down to a tie with the Custom.

Following those top performing models, the KitchenAid Pro Line and the Breville both earned a 7 out of 10. The Breville produced moderately better hummus than the KitchenAid Pro Line, but not quite at the same level as the Hamilton Beach and the Custom. However, the Breville did produce excellent nut butter after 10 minutes of churning — of equivalent quality to the Hamilton Beach 10-Cup, with the added benefit of not shaking nearly as much.

The KitchenAid Pro Line created decent nut butter after 14 minutes, and only required a few scrapes with a spatula in the beginning to knock down some stray nuts. These models both made acceptable tomato and applesauce, with the Breville producing better tomato sauce — though not as quality as the Cuisinart Custom — and the KitchenAid Pro Line having an edge up at creating smoother applesauce. Neither Breville nor KitchenAid Pro leaked at all in our fill line test, most likely due to both having rubber sealing mechanisms.

The KitchenAid 9-Cup, Cuisinart Elemental, Cuisinart Elite, and the Braun all comprised the bulk group, earning a 6 out of 10 for this metric. The KitchenAid 9-Cup tied for the best hummus with the Hamilton Beach 10-Cup. Next were the Cuisinart Elemental and the Cuisinart Elite which both made slightly better hummus than the Breville but inferior to the Cuisinart Custom.

The KitchenAid 9-Cup unanimously tied as the best hummus.
The KitchenAid 9-Cup unanimously tied as the best hummus.

The Braun made the worst hummus of this group and created the second-coarsest hummus of the entire group. However, the Braun did make the best nut butter of the group, requiring only a quick spatula scrape in the beginning and created a product that equaled the KitchenAid Pro Line after 15 minutes. The Cuisinart Elite created average nut butter after 16 minutes, beating out the product from the Cuisinart Elemental. The KitchenAid 9-Cup shut off from overheating after 18 minutes, hurting its score considerably. The KitchenAid 9-Cup did redeem itself slightly by creating pretty much perfect tomato sauce. The Braun and the Cuisinart Elite produced slightly above-average tomato sauce, while the Elemental's was a little on the chunky side.

All of these models produced average or above-average applesauce. The Braun, Elemental were the only models of this group of 4 to have zero leakage. The Braun did not have a max fill line, so we filled it up a comparable amount to similarly sized models, about 50%. The Cuisinart Elite leaked a small amount, performing much better than the KitchenAid 9-Cup. This food processor leaked horribly, even worse than the Hamilton Beach 10-Cup.

Finishing out the back of the pack, the Hamilton Beach Professional and the BLACK+DECKER earned a 5 and a 4 out of 10, respectively. The Hamilton Beach Professional actually made alright hummus, comparable to the Breville, in direct contrast to the Hamilton Beach Professional which pureed the coarsest hummus out of the bunch. Both of these models took 25 minutes to make acceptable nut butter, and both required periodic help along the way. Both of these models produced moderately chunky tomato and applesauce, but the BLACK+DECKER was the only one of the pair to leak, though not as profusely as the Hamilton Beach 10-Cup or the KitchenAid 9-Cup.

Twenty carrots  ready to be shredded and ranked to see which food processor can truly shred.
Twenty carrots, ready to be shredded and ranked to see which food processor can truly shred.

Shredding


Home-made macaroni and cheese or hash browns instantly become more appealing when you can simply set up your food processor, rather than wrecking your nails on a grater. We shredded cheese, potatoes, and carrots with the shredding attachments on these machines, as well as evaluated the plethora of shredding options available to choose from. Check out the chart below to see which model can truly shred, and which ones couldn't keep up.


Back to the top position, the Breville earned the top score of 8 out of 10 for its quality shredding performance. It did a fantastic job at shredding carrots — the best of the group — creating nice, crisp pieces that didn't stick together and only left a single small piece unshredded. The Breville also did a great job at shredding potatoes, only leaving two small slices behind, but it was surpassed by the Braun, which produced shredded potatoes that were of moderately higher quality.

The Braun made some of the highest-quality shredded potatoes of the group.
The Braun made some of the highest-quality shredded potatoes of the group.

The Breville offers two shredding options: fine and medium and did an average job at shredding cheese. The second-best shredders were the Cuisinart Elemental and the Braun. This pair both have the option to choose between a fine and a medium shred, and both did an exemplary job at shredding cheese. The Braun did the best overall, only leaving a few bits of cheese behind and producing primarily shredded — not crumbled — cheese.

The results of our shredded cheese test.
The results of our shredded cheese test.

The Elemental shredded all of the cheese but had slightly lower quality product than the Braun. This pair also performed very similarly when it came to potatoes, with the Braun moderately leading and the Elemental performing comparably to the Breville. However, this pair did lag behind the Breville when it came to shredding carrots — the Braun more so than the Elemental

Next in shredding performance were the Hamilton Beach 10-Cup, the Hamilton Beach Professional, and the Cuisinart Custom, all earning a 6 out of 10. This trio all only have a single shredding setting: medium. The Hamilton Beach 10-Cup did the best job shredding of the group, moderately better than the BLACK+DECKER and the Breville. Next was the Hamilton Beach Professional and then the, Cuisinart Custom. These models had much more crumbs of cheese and flimsier strands.

Each member of this trio shredded potatoes roughly the same as cheese, but all of these models did substantially better at shredding carrots. The Hamilton Beach Professional actually tied for the Breville at being the best overall at shredding carrots, with the Cuisinart Custom just behind. The Hamilton Beach 10-Cup did above average at shredding carrots but performed slightly worse than the Cuisinart Elite and the Cuisinart Elemental.

The results of our shredded carrot test.
The results of our shredded carrot test.

Ranking average at shredding, both the Cuisinart Elite and the KitchenAid 9-Cup earned an overall score of 5 out of 10 for this metric. These models both have two settings for shredding, but both did a subpar job at shredding cheese. The Elite had almost as many crumbles as shreds of cheese, and the KitchenAid 9-Cup only produced a bunch of very thin — and somewhat sickly looking — cheese shreds, even on its largest setting. The KitchenAid did much better at shredding potatoes, while the Elite did a solid job at shredding carrots.

Rounding out the bottom of the pack were the BLACK+DECKER and the KitchenAid Pro Line, both meriting a 3 out of 10 for their overall inferior shredding performance. The BLACK+DECKER had only a medium shred option, while the KitchenAid did have two settings to pick from. The KitchenAid did a subpar job at shredding cheese, performing similarly to the other KitchenAid model. The BLACK+DECKER actually did an alright job shredding cheese, but we thought it might break due to the sounds it was making. These both did a below-average job at shredding potatoes and carrots, with the KitchenAid Pro Line doing the worst of the entire group at shredding potatoes, and the BLACK+DECKER doing the overall worst at shredding carrots.

The KitchenAid Pro Line set up with its slicing blade.
The KitchenAid Pro Line set up with its slicing blade.

Slicing


The converse of slicing, as for most machines you flip the shredding disc to use the slicing functions. We performed a similar set of tests as shredding, assessing the difficulty of setting up and adjusting the slicing blade for desired thickness and then evaluated each machine's skill at slicing tomatoes, potatoes, and zucchini. You can see which model were a slice above the rest in the chart below.


There was a three-way tie for first place, with the Cuisinart Elite, KitchenAid 9-Cup, and the KitchenAid Pro Line all earning an 8 out of 10. These models all have adjustable blades to set the slicing thickness, and all did a great job at slicing tomatoes, once we got the hang of using them.

The Cuisinart Elite produced some of the nicest sliced tomatoes of the group.
The Cuisinart Elite produced some of the nicest sliced tomatoes of the group.

The Elite continued its stellar performance when we moved on to potatoes, while the pair of KitchenAid's fell off slightly, getting docked for showing more taper on the slices. They did regain ground with the zucchini, and all three models once again produced great slices.

The results of our zucchini slicing test.
The results of our zucchini slicing test.

Following this top trio, the Breville, Cuisinart Custom and the Hamilton Beach Professional all earned 7 out of 10 for their second-tier slicing performance. The Breville was much easier to adjust for thickness, as the numbers corresponded to millimeters, compared to the arbitrary 1-15 scale on the Hamilton Beach Professional. The Custom included a 4 mm disc for slicing, but other thickness discs are available for purchase. This trio did a great job at creating even tomato slices, all comparable to the Elite.

The Breville's sliced tomatoes were on par with the top scorer  but the quality dropped when it came to slicing potatoes and zucchini.
The Breville's sliced tomatoes were on par with the top scorer, but the quality dropped when it came to slicing potatoes and zucchini.

Performance dropped slightly at slicing potatoes, with the Breville and the Hamilton Beach Professional scoring similarly to either KitchenAid models, due to the slight taper on the slices. The Cuisinart Custom did a great job, comparable to the Elite.

The Hamilton Beach Professional did take the lead on slicing zucchini, creating even slices compared to the taper of the Breville and the Cuisinart Custom.

Next came the Cuisinart Elemental with a 6 out of 10. This model had a slicing blade that was easy to adjust, with each number corresponding to millimeters of thickness. It did a great job at slicing tomatoes, earning the same score as the KitchenAid 9-Cup or the Cuisinart Elite. However, its performance fell off at slicing tomatoes or potatoes, producing average quality slices, similar to the Braun for potatoes and the Breville for carrots.

Lagging behind the Elemental, the Hamilton Beach 10-Cup earned a 5 out of 10. This model has zero slice thickness adjustability. This model had a very small feed tube, meaning that we had to cut the tomatoes to fit, which had a negative effect on slice quality.

The Hamilton Beach 10-Cup partially destroyed the tomatoes when slicing them.
The Hamilton Beach 10-Cup partially destroyed the tomatoes when slicing them.

This model also produced rough and tapered potato slices but did much better at slicing zucchini, producing slices of similar quality to the KitchenAid Pro Line.

Rounding out the bottom of the pack were the BLACK+DECKER and the Braun, both faring poorly at slicing and deserving a 4 and a 3 out of 10, respectively. Neither of these models offers any slicing adjustability. The BLACK+DECKER produced about average tomato slices, slightly better than the Hamilton Beach 10-Cup, while the Braun did the worst job at slicing tomatoes overall, spraying the tomato innards all over the place and totally destroying the tomatoes.

The Braun completely obliterated the tomatoes when slicing.
The Braun completely obliterated the tomatoes when slicing.

The Braun did slightly better at slicing potatoes, producing average slices that compared well with the Cuisinart Elemental, but it was once again the worst of the entire group at slicing zucchini. The BLACK+DECKER was the worst of the group at slicing potatoes but did marginally better at slicing zucchini, producing slices that were only moderately worse than the Cuisinart Custom or Elemental

The various pieces of the KitchenAid Pro Line drying after being cleaned. This model was above average in terms of being easy to clean.
The various pieces of the KitchenAid Pro Line drying after being cleaned. This model was above average in terms of being easy to clean.

Cleaning


The absolute worst part of cooking: clean up and dishes. This final metric encompassed how difficult it was to clean these products, looking separately at the bowl, blade, and lid. The difficulty of cleaning can be the deciding factor between setting up the food processor to accomplish a task, or simply performing the same task manually. The chart below shows which models were the easiest to clean, and which ones were a struggle.


The Breville regained the top spot for this final metric, earning an 8 out of 10. This model has the easiest blade, bowl, and lid to wash of the whole group. The blade had a longer shaft that made it a breeze to clean without accidentally slicing fingers, and there were very few nooks and crannies in the bowl or lid for food to get caught in.

A large group of models ranked next behind the Breville in terms of being easiest to clean, with the Braun, Cuisinart Elite, Cuisinart Custom, KitchenAid 9-Cup, and the KitchenAid Pro Line all earning a 6 out of 10. The Braun had an exceptionally easy to clean blade and lid, but the bowl was actually one of the most difficult to clean, with some plastic details on the inside that were prone to catching food. The Elite ranked slightly above average across the board, slightly worse than the Custom at cleaning the bowl and the lid. However, the Custom had a decently hard to clean blade — much harder than the Braun or the Breville. The KitchenAid 9-Cup and the KitchenAid Pro Line were similarly easy to clean across the board, with blades that were the easiest to clean of this group.

Next were the Hamilton Beach 10-Cup and the BLACK+DECKER, both scoring a 5 out of 10. These models both had average to clean bowls and blades, with the lids slightly easier to clean. Rounding out the bottom of the pack were the Cuisinart Elemental and Hamilton Beach Professional, meriting a 4 out of 10. These models both had difficult to clean bowls and lid, though the blades were slightly easier to clean.

Which food processor is the best? Check out our full review to find out.
Which food processor is the best? Check out our full review to find out.

Conclusion


While there are countless different food processors available, hopefully, this review will help steer you in the direction of whichever models is the best for your slicing and dicing needs.
David Wise and Austin Palmer

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