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KitchenAid 5-Cup Review

Good for certain sauces and veggies, but not recommended as a solution for food processing because of its limited size and abilities
KitchenAid 5-Cup
Credit: KitchenAid
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Price:   $100 List | $89.99 at Amazon
Pros:  Small storage footprint, easy to move
Cons:  Limited capabilities, power switch needs held down, lots of pre-processing prep
Manufacturer:   KitchenAid
By Genaveve Bradshaw and Hale Milano  ⋅  Sep 14, 2022
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47
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#11 of 12
  • Chopping - 20% 7.0
  • Mixing - 20% 7.0
  • Pureeing - 20% 3.0
  • Shredding - 15% 2.0
  • Slicing - 15% 1.0
  • Cleaning - 10% 8.0

Our Verdict

The KitchenAid 5-Cup is an affordable food chopper with limited abilities given its small size. Our testing process results ultimately conveyed that its size was a detracting factor, and several aspects left us wanting more. For simple sauces and some vegetable chopping, the machine is adequate at producing single servings. However, other models are better in both price and performance.

Editor's Note: This KitchenAid 5-Cup review was updated on September 14th, 2022, with additional information comparing products and details on what we'd recommend to a friend.

Compare to Similar Products

 
KitchenAid 5-Cup
This Product
KitchenAid 5-Cup
Awards  Best Buy Award Best Buy Award Best Buy Award  
Price $100 List
$89.99 at Amazon
$250 List
$229.99 at Amazon
$58 List
$62.99 at Amazon
$120 List
$119.95 at Amazon
$40 List
$41.00 at Amazon
Overall Score Sort Icon
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46
Star Rating
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Pros Small storage footprint, easy to moveGreat at pureeing and slicingGreat at pureeing, good at chopping, inexpensiveGreat for shredding, slicing, good at choppingInexpensive, better than average at mixing
Cons Limited capabilities, power switch needs held down, lots of pre-processing prepNo adjustability of shredding or slicingLeaky, not the best at mixing, loudLittle more difficult to cleanShreds and slices poorly, loud
Bottom Line Good for certain sauces and veggies, but not recommended as a solution for food processing because of its limited size and abilitiesOne of the best food processors you can get on a budget without sacrificing too much performanceFor those trying to save some dough, this inexpensive model will get the job done, especially when it comes to pureeing and choppingOffering all-around excellent performance given its price tag, this is one of our favorite recommendations to those on a budgetA small model that is the least expensive and lowest scoring of the group
Rating Categories KitchenAid 5-Cup Cuisinart Custom 14 Hamilton Beach 10-Cup Ninja Professional Black+Decker 8-Cup
Chopping (20%)
7.0
6.0
7.0
6.0
5.0
Mixing (20%)
7.0
6.0
5.0
6.0
6.0
Pureeing (20%)
3.0
8.0
9.0
7.0
4.0
Shredding (15%)
2.0
6.0
6.0
7.0
3.0
Slicing (15%)
1
7.0
5.0
7.0
4.0
Cleaning (10%)
8.0
6.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
Specs KitchenAid 5-Cup Cuisinart Custom 14 Hamilton Beach 10-Cup Ninja Professional Black+Decker 8-Cup
Model # KFCB519 DFP-14BCNY 70730 BN600/BN601 FP1600B
Bowl Size 5 Cup 14 cup 10 cup 9 cup 8 cup
Dimensions W: 7.5"
H: 10.5"
D: 6"
W: 7.75"
H: 15"
D: 10.75"
W: 10.5"
H: 15.5"
D: 8.5"
W: 9.9"
H: 15.6"
D: 7.3"
W: 7.5"
H: 15.3"
D: 10.7"
Measured Weight of Base 11 pounds
7 ounces
12 pounds, 6 ounces 3 pounds, 1 ounce 4 pounds, 8 ounces 3 pounds, 2 ounces
BPA Free Yes Yes Yes Yes No
Motor 240 Watt 720 Watt 450 Watt 850 Watt 450 Watt
Speed Control Off/1/2 On/Off/Pulse High/Low/Pulse/Off Chop/Puree/Dough/Disc/Low/High/Pulse On/Off/Pulse
Cord Storage Cordless (unless charging but there is no cord storage on the base) None Internal External Cord Wrap Underside Cord Wrap
Feet Smooth Rubber (Non-Skid) Smooth Rubber Suction Cups Suction Cups Suction Cups
Decibels at 3ft 57 61.5 96 80 95
Mini Bowl Blade N/A Yes N/A N/A N/A
Accessory Storage Case No No No No No
Slicing Disc No Non adjustable Non adjustable Non adjustable Non adjustable
Shredding Disc No Medium Medium Non adjustable Medium
Dough Blade No No No Yes No
Whipping Attatchment No No No No No
Citrus Juicer No No No No No
Dicing Kit No No No No No
Built-in Bowl Scraper No No Yes No No
French Fry Disc No No No No No
Julienne Disc No No No No No

Our Analysis and Test Results

The KitchenAid 5-Cup is a small footprint model with limited capacity in its pitcher. It comes with two power options and has a built-in rechargeable battery. It is worth noting that the machine can not be operated while charging. A pulse button controls the power on the pitcher handle, so operating the motor is only possible while gripping the pitcher. Although we noted several drawbacks to this model, we were pleasantly surprised by certain results.

Performance Comparison


KitchenAid 5-Cup food processor - the 5-cup device is battery operated, has two power levels, and...
The 5-cup device is battery operated, has two power levels, and comes with a single blade.
Credit: Abriah Wofford

Chopping


In the kitchen, we put our lineup to the test, chopping onions, carrots, and nuts. The KitchenAid 5-Cup has a singular pulse button on the handle. To use the device, just press and hold the button; once released, the motor stops. Overall, we noticed decent chopping results across the tests, but they were dampened by the pre-processing required to fit our food into the bowl.

KitchenAid 5-Cup food processor - food had to be cut or quartered before fitting in the pitcher.
Food had to be cut or quartered before fitting in the pitcher.
Credit: Abriah Wofford

Before we could begin chopping onions, our tester had to quarter them in order to fit in the 5-Cup. Processing was a delicate balance, as the line between large pieces and over-processed was the difference of only a couple of pulses.

Carrots, too, required quartering before they fit in the pitcher. However, the results were good, with no chunks or even noticeably larger pieces after chopping. The KitchenAid actually exceeded the carrot chopping scores over other units, taking only six pulses to chop the carrots completely.

KitchenAid 5-Cup food processor - perfectly chopped carrots.
Perfectly chopped carrots.
Credit: Abriah Wofford

Almond chopping was a slightly tedious task. After only three pulses, our testers had to remove the lid and clear out some stuck and unchopped nuts from around the blade. The KitchenAid 5-Cup eventually chopped all the nuts; however, we could only fit 2.5 cups of almonds before filling the pitcher to the brim.

KitchenAid 5-Cup food processor - two and a half cups of almonds filled the five-cup pitcher to the...
Two and a half cups of almonds filled the five-cup pitcher to the brim.
Credit: Abriah Wofford

Mixing


To test mixing capabilities, we attempted to make a standard recipe for pizza dough, mayonnaise, and pie crust from scratch with each of our food processors. The KitchenAid 5-Cup performed well but suffered a serious disadvantage in performance due to its small bowl size. The recipes had to be split in half in order to fit inside the device.

KitchenAid 5-Cup food processor - the small blades on the kitchenaid did not hold up well against our...
The small blades on the KitchenAid did not hold up well against our many rigorous tests.
Credit: Abriah Wofford

Unfortunately, even once the dough ball started to form, the pitcher was too small to enable free rotation around the blades. Complicating matters further, we had to stop and charge the device two separate times while mixing as it ran out of charge midway through. This was a headache since, as mentioned, it cannot be used while charging.

The pie crust went similarly to the pizza dough. The pulse button created a varying speed, and it was difficult to add ingredients in a way that ensured appropriate consistency.

The mayonnaise test with the KitchenAid was a great success. Puffy, whipped texture and a perfect taste.

Pureeing


Our puree test entailed making hummus, nut butter, tomato sauce, and applesauce from scratch. Lastly, a dedicated leak test was conducted to verify the integrity of the pitcher. Ultimately, the KitchenAid did not meet our standards.

KitchenAid 5-Cup food processor - the kitchenaid made a rather chunky hummus.
The KitchenAid made a rather chunky hummus.
Credit: Abriah Wofford

Making hummus was once again difficult due to capacity issues. The 5-cup pitcher could only puree a single can of chickpeas at a time and still struggled, jammed, and required unclogging over the five minutes it took to puree a coarse hummus.

KitchenAid 5-Cup food processor - making tomato sauce was accomplished on a single charge, although...
Making tomato sauce was accomplished on a single charge, although there were some chunks of garlic.
Credit: Abriah Wofford

Making homemade tomato sauce with the device was successful. We were able to completely puree the tomatoes and chop the garlic moderately, resulting in a usable tomato sauce. All this was completed on a single charge.

Nut butter testing was a different story. This device's short battery life limited the ability to puree consistently, resulting in two minutes of use before needing a charge. In addition, the small pitcher size resulted in an excessively long prep time (almost an hour) for a limited amount of nut butter, even if it was a thick and creamy consistency.

Our applesauce recipe called for three apples, but only one apple was able to fit in the KitchenAid. Even then, the processor didn't have enough power to chop through a handful of apple slices.

The spillage rate was tested by filling each processor with water to its maximum fill line, then powering on the device. The KitchenAid started leaking before we even powered it on; although it has a rubber seal it appears loose. Once powered on, water sprayed everywhere.

Shredding


Although many processors offer different shredding options and blades, the KitchenAid has only a low and high power setting — no disc or cutting options.

KitchenAid 5-Cup food processor - cheese was sliced into half-inch cubes before processing.
Cheese was sliced into half-inch cubes before processing.
Credit: Abriah Wofford

Cheese shredding was done by fitting half-inch cubes into the block; once the cubes fit, the 5-Cup chops them into even pieces, although our testers considered the results closer to "chopped cheese" rather than shredded.

Carrots and potatoes were unable to be shredded at all. The potato skewered onto the end of the blade, and the carrot was chopped successfully but not shredded.

Slicing


As with shredding, the KitchenAid only has one blade and offers no additional options for slicing work. We attempted to slice tomatoes, potatoes, and a zucchini. Unfortunately, we were met with failure on all three. Even after pre-chopping the food to fit in the pitcher, the food was stuck spinning on the blade in every test instead of being sliced.

KitchenAid 5-Cup food processor - during slicing, all of our tests results ended with the food...
During slicing, all of our tests results ended with the food skewered on the blade.
Credit: Abriah Wofford

Cleaning


A positive note about the KitchenAid was its ease of cleaning. Our testers were able to easily separate the pieces and spray them down to clean. As with other models, a bottle brush helps to clean hard-to-access areas.

KitchenAid 5-Cup food processor - lid, bowl, and blade separated easily for a quick rinse by hand.
Lid, bowl, and blade separated easily for a quick rinse by hand.
Credit: Abriah Wofford

Should You Buy the KitchenAid 5-Cup?


While its small size is ideal for those in small living quarters or limited storage room, the price and performance of the KitchenAid 5-Cup is underwhelming. There are other options that are both cheaper and better performers.

What Other Food Processors Should You Consider?


If your budget is your primary concern, the best price-to-performance option in our food processor lineup is the Hamilton Beach 10-Cup, which both outperforms and is less expensive than the KitchenAid. If you're looking for a step up in performance but still want a compact, space-saving design, the Ninja Professional Food Processor is only slightly more expensive and performs better in all of our tests. We'd recommend either of these models over the KitchenAid.

Genaveve Bradshaw and Hale Milano
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