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Cuisinart Elite Collection 2.0 14-Cup Review

A costly, average food processor that is exceptional at slicing and average in most other areas
Cuisinart  Elite Collection 2.0 14-Cup
Credit: Cuisinart
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Price:   $350 List | $349.95 at Amazon
Pros:  Slices great
Cons:  Average at shredding, expensive
Manufacturer:   Cuisinart
By David Wise and Austin Palmer  ⋅  Aug 30, 2021
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62
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#7 of 10
  • Chopping - 20% 6
  • Mixing - 20% 6
  • Pureeing - 20% 6
  • Shredding - 15% 5
  • Slicing - 15% 8
  • Cleaning - 10% 6

Our Verdict

The Cuisinart Elite Collection 2.0 14-Cup is an alright food processor, but it didn't particularly impress us. While this model scored average or above in each of our testing metrics, it still was outperformed by the majority of the models that we looked at and had a substantially higher retail price than its peers. However, this model did stand out for its slicing performance, where it earned the highest score.

Compare to Similar Products

 
Awards  Editors' Choice Award Best Buy Award Best Buy Award Best Buy Award 
Price $350 List
$349.95 at Amazon
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$250 List
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$100 List
$99.99 at Amazon
$45 List
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Pros Slices greatBest at chopping, mixing, and shredding, easy to cleanGreat at pureeing and slicingGreat for shredding, slicing, good at choppingGreat at pureeing, good at chopping, inexpensive
Cons Average at shredding, expensiveExpensiveNo adjustability of shredding or slicingLittle more difficult to cleanLeaky, not the best at mixing, loud
Bottom Line A costly, average food processor that is exceptional at slicing and average in most other areasOur favorite overall model excels at chopping, shredding, and mixing, and it's exceptionally easy to cleanOne of the best food processors you can get on a budget without sacrificing too much performanceOffering all-around excellent performance given its price tag, this is one of our favorites to anyone shopping for a bargain buyFor those trying to save some dough, this inexpensive model will get the job done, especially when it comes to pureeing and chopping
Rating Categories Elite Collection 2.... Breville Sous Chef... Cuisinart Custom 14 Professional Hamilton Beach 10-Cup
Chopping (20%)
6.0
9.0
6.0
6.0
7.0
Mixing (20%)
6.0
9.0
6.0
6.0
5.0
Pureeing (20%)
6.0
7.0
8.0
7.0
8.0
Shredding (15%)
5.0
8.0
6.0
7.0
6.0
Slicing (15%)
8.0
7.0
7.0
7.0
5.0
Cleaning (10%)
6.0
8.0
6.0
5.0
5.0
Specs Elite Collection 2.... Breville Sous Chef... Cuisinart Custom 14 Professional Hamilton Beach 10-Cup
Model # FP-14DCN BFP800CBXL DFP-14BCNY BN600/BN601 70730
Bowl Size 14 cup and 4.5 cup mini bowl 16 cup and 2.5 cup mini bowl 14 cup 9 cup 10 cup
Dimensions W: 8.5"
H: 17"
D: 10.5"
W: 8"
H: 11"
D: 18"
W: 7.75"
H: 15"
D: 10.75"
W: 9.9"
H: 15.6"
D: 7.3"
W: 10.5"
H: 15.5"
D: 8.5"
Measured Weight of Base 14 pounds, 9 ounces 15 pounds, 8 ounces 12 pounds, 6 ounces 4 pounds, 8 ounces 3 pounds, 1 ounce
BPA Free Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Motor 1300 Watt 1200 Watt 720 Watt 850 Watt 450 Watt
Speed Control On/Off/Dough/Pulse On/Off/Pulse On/(Pulse/Off) Chop/Puree/Dough/Disc/Low/High/Pulse High/Low/Pulse/Off
Cord Storage Retractable Internal None External Cord Wrap Internal
Feet Textured Rubber Smooth Rubber (Non-Skid) Smooth Rubber Suction Cups Suction Cups
Decibels at 3ft 61.5 67.5 61.5 80 96
Mini Bowl Blade Yes Yes Yes N/A N/A
Accessory Storage Case Yes Yes No No No
Slicing Disc Adjustable to 8mm Adjustable to 8mm Non adjustable Non adjustable Non adjustable
Shredding Disc Fine and Medium Fine and Medium Medium Non adjustable Medium
Dough Blade Yes Yes No Yes No
Whipping Attatchment No Yes No No No
Citrus Juicer No No No No No
Dicing Kit No No No No No
Build in Bowl Scraper No No No No Yes
French Fry Disc No Yes No No No
Julienne Disc No Yes No No No

Our Analysis and Test Results

Performance Comparison


The Elite was on the expensive side, and didn't score terribly well.
The Elite was on the expensive side, and didn't score terribly well.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

Chopping


A dislike of chopping onions may be the primary reason that you are even considering getting one of these products in the first place. Even if you don't mind shedding a few tears during food preparation, any good food processor should handle chopping things with ease. The Cuisinart Elite did alright in this metric, earning an average score for its performance at chopping onions, carrots, almonds, and for the level of control offered by the "Pulse" button. It did average at chopping onions. The majority of two quartered onions were finely chopped with six pulses, except for the three very large chunks that remained un-chopped.

The three residual large chunks brought down the score for this model.
The three residual large chunks brought down the score for this model.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

The Elite did worse at chopping carrots, actually tying for the lowest score of the group. It struggled to chop all of the carrots, leaving a bunch of large chunks and correctly chopped carrots or over-processing a large portion of the batch to eliminate the residual larger pieces. It did substantially better at chopping almonds, producing a third-tier quality product. The almonds were chopped, but it took a little longer than other models, and the Elite produced a lot more pulverized almond dust than we would have liked. This model did offer some of the most precise control, with the blade stopping immediately upon the release of the "Pulse" button.

The mixing blade set up on the Elite.
The mixing blade set up on the Elite.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

Mixing


The Elite did equivalently well at mixing. We evaluated and ranked the pie crust dough, mayonnaise, and pizza dough produced by each appliance. It did an acceptable job at mixing pizza dough, though it did require some intervention with a spatula to knock the ball down to keep mixing. The ball of dough kept dragging on the lid and staying too wet rather than adequately mixing before we intervened. It did a little better with pie crust dough, though there was some side sticking while mixing. The dough did have some dry spots in it when rolled out, evidence of insufficient mixing. We could not successfully make mayonnaise in this model, but it would mix the lemon and egg in our one cup recipe.

Pureeing


Continuing its trend, the Elite scored an average score for pureeing. We compared the hummus, nut butter, tomato sauce, and applesauce that each machine-made, using a panel of tasters to determine the scores. The hummus created by this machine was very smooth and was rated high by our panel. It did average at grinding nut butter, though it did take some babysitting initially, producing a satisfactory finished product in around 16 minutes.

The tomato sauce was above-average quality, while the applesauce produced a product that was chunky; a large chunk of apple was lect un-pureed. This model didn't do the best in our leak test, with water slowly dripping out around the seal.

This model leaked slightly, but not a catastrophic amount.
This model leaked slightly, but not a catastrophic amount.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

The maximum fill line was at close to 10 cups of water in the bowl, which may have been a little ambitious.

The Elite, set up to shred.
The Elite, set up to shred.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

Shredding


The performance dropped when it came to shredding. We compared the shredded cheese, carrots, and potatoes created by each food processor and compared and contrasted the level of shredding adjustability provided by each machine.

The Elite has both a fine and medium shredding option. It didn't do the best at shredding cheese, tying for the lowest score with a few other models.

There were a handful of small and stringy shreds bringing down the...
There were a handful of small and stringy shreds bringing down the overall score for this model.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

This model did average at shredding potatoes, with around 80% of the shredded potato being high quality and the rest being small and stringy. The Elite even further improved when it came to shredding carrots, with the actual shreds being very nice, with only a small part being a mutilated mush.

The Elite produced acceptable shredded carrots, with only a small...
The Elite produced acceptable shredded carrots, with only a small portion of mush.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

It also neglected to shred a handful of pieces, dropping its score slightly.

The Elite was much less efficient at other models, neglecting to...
The Elite was much less efficient at other models, neglecting to shred a handful of pieces.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

This model would fit a two pound block of cheese in the chute without trimming. However, a relatively large chunk of cheese managed to squeeze through the shredding disc without being shredded, and the shredded cheese produced had plenty of crumbles, reducing the quality.

The slicing blade on the Elite does an exceptional job.
The slicing blade on the Elite does an exceptional job.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

Slicing


This is the single metric where the Elite truly shined. We tested each machine by slicing tomatoes, zucchini, and potatoes, and the Elite did a great job at shredding all three. We also really liked how the disc on this model was easily adjustable for slicing thickness, with millimeter increments marked out. The sliced potatoes were about as perfect as we could hope for, with only a minuscule bit of taper on some slices. The sliced tomatoes were also fantastic, and the chute was large enough to fit even the largest tomato we tested with, even though it was a bit tight.

The Elite produces some of the nicest sliced tomatoes of the group.
The Elite produces some of the nicest sliced tomatoes of the group.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

The zucchini slices were also impeccable, though the large chute made skinnier objects prone to fall over. Regardless, the slices were very consistent and had almost zero taper.

The Elite drying out after the cleaning test.
The Elite drying out after the cleaning test.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

Cleaning


The bowl, lid, blades, and discs are all dishwasher safe, though the manufacturer recommends using the top shelf only. The blade was of medium length and easy to wash manually. The lid and bowl both were simple to clean, with no annoying plastic details for food to become snared in.

The included accessories with the Elite.
The included accessories with the Elite.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

Value


This model isn't a great value — it scored somewhat poorly and had a higher retail price.

Though a little pricey, the Elite score fine.
Though a little pricey, the Elite score fine.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

Conclusion


While this model did excel at slicing, it failed to impress in our other tests. While it might be a good option if you only want to slice things, the price tag seems quite high for a slicing-only machine. It performed in somewhat the opposite way from the top scorers — excelling at slicing and doing an alright job in our other tests, where the others did well at everything and then faltered at slicing.

The chopping blade installed on the Elite.
The chopping blade installed on the Elite.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

David Wise and Austin Palmer