The world's most in-depth and scientific reviews of gear

Best Bluetooth Speaker of 2020

The Bose SoundLink Revolve sounded so good in our testing that it made flowers grow.
Monday July 27, 2020
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In the past 4 years we've tested more than 40 of the best Bluetooth speakers. In this 2020 update we consider the 20 most compelling models currently on the market. To test these speakers we listened to each side-by-side for more than a hundred hours, took them to the beach, brought them to campfires, travelled with them everywhere, and pushed their batteries to the limit. We also consulted with a professional audio engineer to ensure our sound quality tests were up to snuff. The resulting top picks from all of this testing cover the entire range of portable speakers, from larger models that place an emphasis on sound quality, to smaller waterproof devices that can take a beating, and everything in between.

Top 20 Product Ratings

Displaying 1 - 5 of 20
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Best Overall Bluetooth Speaker


Bose SoundLink Revolve


Editors' Choice Award
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  • 5

$199.00
at Amazon
See It

86
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Sound Quality 10
  • Portability 7
  • Volume 8
  • Battery Life 8
Weight: 24 oz | Battery Life: 18 hrs
Excellent sound quality
Water-resistant
Great battery life
Expensive
Relatively heavy

For those that demand great sound quality no matter the situation, Bose's flagship portable speakers are the clear choice. Both the Soundlink Revolve and its bigger sibling, the Revolve+, produce exceptionally deep bass and impressive clarity, creating a rich overall sound that you'll be shocked is coming from a battery-powered speaker. That sound is backed up with IPX4 certified waterproofing, meaning both speakers can shake off rain or poolside splashes, and batteries that can supply multiple afternoons worth of music listening. The only difference between these models is that the Revolve+ adds a bit of size and weight in return for a louder maximum volume and more battery life.

The only strikes against these speakers are their price and weight. Listing for significantly more than most other models, these speakers certainly aren't cheap. At 24 ounces the Revolve is certainly noticeable when you put it in a backpack, and the 34 ounce Revolve+ would be a bit cumbersome to lug to the beach. These downsides, however, feel well worth the great sound quality that they provide. We would recommend the Revolve to anyone looking for a portable, high-end listening experience, and the Revolve+ to anyone desiring a speaker with enough volume to power a pool party or barbeque.

Read review: Bose Soundlink Revolve

Read review: Bose Soundlink Revolve+

Best Bang for Your Buck


Bose SoundLink Color II


Best Buy Award
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  • 5

$129.00
at Amazon
See It

73
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Sound Quality 8
  • Portability 7
  • Volume 8
  • Battery Life 5
Weight: 19.8 oz | Battery Life: 13 hrs
Great sound quality
Water-resistant
Good battery life
Rubber coating sometimes hangs onto dust

Striking an impressive balance between price, sound quality, and durability, the Bose Soundlink Color II checks more boxes than most speakers on the market today. While its bass isn't quite as booming as the company's top models, it still manages to produce a rotund low-end that is balanced by great clarity and brightness through the mid and treble ranges. This results in a very well-rounded sound that works great for pretty much any type of music. At around 20 ounces and sporting IPX4 water-resistant, it is relatively portable as well. Finally, it certainly isn't a budget option, but the price is well below that of the premium speakers. Yet it still provides near-premium performance, which makes this speaker a great value-per-dollar.

All in all there isn't too much to complain about when it comes to the Bose Soundlink Color II. In a perfect world it would be a bit lighter, and we would prefer it to be totally waterproof rather than just water-resistant. Additionally its rubber coating, which makes it very resistant to scratches, sometimes attracts lint and dust. However, considering the exceptional price to performance ratio offered by this speaker, these are very minor issues. We would wholeheartedly recommend it to anyone.

Read review: Bose SoundLink Color II

Outstanding Value on a Shoestring Budget


Tribit XSound Go


Best Buy Award
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  • 5

$32.99
(34% off)
at Amazon
See It

54
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Sound Quality 4
  • Portability 8
  • Volume 3
  • Battery Life 8
Weight: 13.4 oz | Battery Life: 18.5 hrs
Inexpensive
Completely waterproof
Weak bass
Not very loud

Sometimes you just want an inexpensive, totally waterproof speaker that you can take out on the lake without worry. If you find yourself in this situation, we think the Tribit XSound Go is your best bet. Sporting fully submersible IPX7 waterproofing, a price tag that won't induce tears if it falls off the boat, and a weight of less than a pound, this speaker is the perfect companion for rough and tumble watersports.

Like all small and relatively inexpensive speakers, the XSound Go cuts some corners when it comes to sound quality. Bass power is a bit lacking, and the overall sound can come through as a bit thin and tinny, especially when the volume is maxed out. But, if you just want a speaker that can belt out a decent tune and withstand a dunking, the XSound Go can check those boxes without costing too much.

Read review: Tribit XSound Go

Best for Travel


Bose SoundLink Micro


Top Pick Award
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  • 5

$99.00
(10% off)
at Amazon
See It

68
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Sound Quality 7
  • Portability 10
  • Volume 6
  • Battery Life 2
Weight: 10.2 oz | Battery Life: 5 hrs
Good sound quality
Completely waterproof
Lightweight and portable
Short battery life

For situations where size and weight are at a premium, it's hard to beat the Bose SoundLink Micro. Tipping the scales at well under a pound and sporting a profile so slim you might be able to fit it in your pocket, this speaker almost disappears when you toss it into a bag. It also pumps out impressive sound that completely belies its small size, with fairly thumpy bass and solid clarity that never gives way to the tinniness heard from many other small speakers.

The only complaint we have about this speaker is its relatively short battery life. It lasted just 5 hours in our testing, which makes it a poor choice for extended camping trips or the like. However, if you're going on a vacation where you'll regularly be able to find an outlet, this speaker will take up almost no space in your carry-on and it can definitely make your hotel room sound better.

Read review: Bose SoundLink Micro

Best Shower Speaker


JBL Clip 3


Top Pick Award
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  • 5

$39.95
(43% off)
at Amazon
See It

73
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Sound Quality 6
  • Portability 10
  • Volume 6
  • Battery Life 8
Weight: 7.5 oz | Battery Life: 18 hrs
Small and portable
Waterproof
Built-in clip
Good sound quality for the size
Sounds tinny at high volumes
More expensive than some comparably sized models

If you're one that sings in the shower, or you like to get a jump on your morning news podcast while washing your hair, the JBL Clip 3 is the perfect companion. This tiny speaker can easily be hung on a shower curtain ring with its titular built-in clip, and will easily shed the water thanks to its IPX7 waterproof rating. It is also impressively small and light, weighing barely more than most smartphones. This, combined with a long battery life, make it a great speaker to always toss in your backpack or daybag, just in case. Despite its small stature, the Clip 3 still manages to sound relatively good, giving most songs their fair due.

The JBL Clip 3 sounds better and lasts longer than most of the other super-portable speakers on the market, and you have to pay a bit extra for that performance. On the other hand, it doesn't sound as good as most similarly-priced but slightly-larger models. However, if you don't mind paying a bit extra and sacrificing a bit of sound quality for a super-portable form factor, we think the JBL Clip 3 is one of the most versatile speakers on the market.

Read review: JBL Clip 3

A Worthy, Waterproof, Bose Alternative


JBL Flip 5


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$89.95
(25% off)
at Amazon
See It

77
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Sound Quality 7
  • Portability 7
  • Volume 9
  • Battery Life 9
Weight: 19 oz | Battery Life: 27 hrs
Good Sound quality
Waterproof
Long battery life
Lacks premium sound

If you're looking at one of the Bose models we lauded above thinking, "this would be perfect if only it were waterproof," the JBL Flip 5 is likely your best alternative. Although it is a clear step down in sound quality when compared to the Bose models, it still sounds quite good. It's also a similar size, produces a lot of volume, and is completely IPX7 waterproof. Plus, it costs a bit less than the competing offerings from Bose. While we haven't yet found the perfect option for true audiophiles that need a speaker capable of surviving a surprise boat capsizing, the Flip 5 is one of the best options currently available on the market.

Read review: JBL Flip 5


A small sampling of the many speakers we tested.
A small sampling of the many speakers we tested.

Why You Should Trust Us


To ensure that we used the best sound quality testing procedure possible we consulted with sound recordist Palmer Taylor. Palmer has recorded audio for such high-profile clients as National Geographic, ESPN, and Google. His specialty lies in location audio, but he has completed several music recording and composition projects as well. Both lifelong musicians, authors Steven Tata and Max Mutter have been testing consumer audio products for more than 4 years. They have now used well over 100 of the most highly regarded home and personal audio gadgets on the market, so they have a strong finger on the pulse of what makes a speaker great.

As we do for all of our audio products, we spent weeks listening to each one of our Bluetooth speakers, side-by-side, shifting between widely varying genres of music and podcasts. After carefully assessing each speaker's relative clarity, bass quality, and overall fullness, we then put them through a battery torture test, blaring a playlist on a loop with the volume cranked up to 75% until they finally gave out. With that out of the way, we then took all of our speakers on bike rides to the beach, to backyard barbeques, and other leisure vacations to assess how well they worked out in the wild. In the end, we completed over 200 hours of testing and identified the best portable speaker for almost any situation.

Related: How We Tested Bluetooth Speakers


Analysis and Test Results


The best Bluetooth speakers manage to be small and light enough to be carried around in a backpack while still being loud enough with quality sound to entertain a group of friends at the beach or in the park. They also need to have enough battery life so the party won't be cut short. Accordingly, we divided our testing metrics into 4 categories that fit these ideals: sound quality, volume, portability, and battery life. We spent hours comparing all of these attributes side-by-side to find the best speaker for every application.

Related: Buying Advice for Bluetooth Speakers

Listening to our speakers  like the UE Boom 2 pictured here  in real world settings was the cornerstone of our sound quality testing.
Listening to our speakers, like the UE Boom 2 pictured here, in real world settings was the cornerstone of our sound quality testing.

Value


Bluetooth speakers vary pretty widely in price, and their overall value depends largely upon what you're looking for. For instance, if you place a premium on sound quality, we think the Bose Soundlink Revolve is well worth its high price tag. If price and waterproof-ness are your primary concerns, the Tribit XSound Go is a great choice. Finally, if you want something that is a reasonable balance between price, sound quality, durability, and portability, we think the Bose Soundlink Color II hits the sweet spot.

Sound Quality


Although no portable Bluetooth speaker is going to be able to match the sound quality of a home speaker system, it needs to provide a big step up from the built-in speakers on your smartphone to be of any real use. To assess sound quality we had a percussionist who is all about that bass and a guitarist that knows the intricacies of treble listen to each speaker play the same songs one after another. After listening to everything from the deep resonance of the Interstellar soundtrack to the high, staccato picking of classical guitar, we scored each speaker on bass, treble, clarity, and dynamic range.


Both the Bose SoundLink Revolve and the Soundlink Revole+ shared the top step on the podium in our sound quality testing. In our testing these speakers produced booming bass and were the only models that could hit high notes without even a trace of clipping. They also had impressive clarity and were able to clearly define each note within even fast saxophone trills. A close runner-up was the Bose SoundLink Mini II. It also produces exceptional sound with no clipping. However, its bass isn't quite as powerful as the Revolve models, which gives its sound a bit less depth and well-roundedness.

The Bose SoundLink Revolve is the best sounding speaker we tested.
The Bose SoundLink Revolve is the best sounding speaker we tested.

Another close runner-up was the Beats Pill+. It matched the Bose Soundlink Mini II with incredible clarity, but it fell just a bit short in terms of bass and treble. The bass still felt good and thumpy but lacked a little body when compared to the Bose, and the treble showed some slight signs of clipping when playing the highest notes.



The Bose SoundLink Color II, the Sony SRS-XB32, and the Beats Pill+ all turned in great but just short of exceptional performances in our sound quality testing. These models are just a small step down in treble quality and clarity from the top performers, with some more complex melodies sounding just a little less crisp. The SoundLink Color's bass is less muddled, but not quite as deep. The bass of the Beats Pill+ still feels good and thumpy, but lacks a little body when compared to the Bose, and the treble shows some slight signs of clipping when playing the highest notes. The Sony SRS-XB32 offers a well-balanced sound across the board, but doesn't have any particular strong suit that would allow it to flatter a specific genre of music.

Do I Need to Worry About EMFs?
Radiation from electromagnetic fields (EMF) has been in the news as of late. While exposure to significant sources of EMFs, like living directly under high voltage power lines for an extended period of time, has been proven to pose health risks, research into the effects of the much lower intensity fields emitted by personal electronics has been less than conclusive. Even if you'd like to employ the precautionary principle and avoid as much EMF as possible, we don't think you need to worry about Bluetooth speakers. According to our measurements, unless you keep the speaker within 6 inches of your head. these devices won't expose you to any more than the general background level of EMF (in which case you should probably be shopping for a pair of headphones instead).

A whole slew of models earned fell into the above average . Although most of these possess slightly different attributes, we like to refer to them generally as "good enough". By that we mean they don't sound tinny or underpowered — the most common problem with a portable speaker. Yet, they also don't offer a particularly premium experience either. For the majority of people that don't want to spend extra to get just a bit more clarity or bass power out of their portable listening device, but don't want to make too many sacrifices either, this is likely an ideal level of sound quality.

First off in this group are the UE Boom 2 and the UE Boom 3. We found both iterations of this speaker to sound very similar, with surprising clarity given the price range, but maybe just a slight lack of bass power when compared to similar models.

The impressively small Bose SoundLink Micro pumps out surprisingly loud bass. However, its small stature takes a little bite out of the higher registers.

The larger Bose Soundlink Revolve+ sounds great and can get very loud.
The larger Bose Soundlink Revolve+ sounds great and can get very loud.

Another pair of siblings, both the JBL Flip 4 and the newer Flip 5 also fell into this group. Both trend towards a bass-heavy profile, though the Flip 5 does have some more clarity, resulting in a slightly better overall sound.

The JBL Charge 4 offers great clarity in the higher registers, but its low end can occasionally get a bit muddled. Still, it provides a good overall listening experience that mostly belies its portable pedigree.

The UE Boom 3 is one of the best sounding totally-waterproof speakers we've ever used.
The UE Boom 3 is one of the best sounding totally-waterproof speakers we've ever used.

Two of the super-portable, sub-1 pound speakers managed to perform reasonably well in our sound quality testing, including the JBL Clip 3 and the UE Wonderboom. Both of these models produce a similar and reasonable amount of bass, making them sound much more robust and less thin than the other more compact models we've tested. Of the two the JBL CLip 3 is the smallest, making its sound quality particularly impressive.

The UE Wonderboom offers decent sound for a tiny speaker.
The UE Wonderboom offers decent sound for a tiny speaker.

The JBL Charge 3 offers a somewhat unbalanced sound, in our opinion. In their marketing, JBL calls this speaker the "bass radiator" and it clearly prioritizes bass over all else. Although the bass does sound great, it is largely to the detriment of overall clarity, with the overarching sound having a muddled quality. Dynamic range also feels a bit depressed, with some accents and ghost notes not producing their desired effect. However, if you just want something that can throw down a powerful, artificial triplet backbeat, the Charge 3 is a good choice.

The Tribit XSound Go certainly isn't the most melodious model we tested. The bass is quite weak and the clarity is mediocre, creating an overall sound that we would classify as acceptable, but not good. Still, it is a vast improvement compared to listening to music via the built-in speakers on your phone.

The waterproof JBL Clip 3 is a great companion for singing in the shower.
The waterproof JBL Clip 3 is a great companion for singing in the shower.

The Anker SoundCore 2 and Cambridge SoundWorks Oontz Angle are, in our opinion, the least melodious of the bunch. Both of these models produced fairly weak bass and relatively poor clarity. The Anker SoundCore 2 had a bit less clipping and a bit more dynamic range than the Oontz, but still lagged behind the rest of the field in both of those metrics. Both of these speakers still represent a significant upgrade in volume and a decent upgrade in quality when compared to a smartphone's built-in speakers, and should still be seen as decent budget options.

We carried our speakers everywhere to assess their portability  including even models that felt a bit too big to be carried.
We carried our speakers everywhere to assess their portability, including even models that felt a bit too big to be carried.

Portability


If a Bluetooth speaker is small and light enough to shove in your bag you're more likely to have it with you when your entourage demands some sweet beats. Our portability testing was based on three simple questions: is it too heavy, do I have to worry about getting it wet, and can it easily fit in my backpack? The first two questions were easy enough to answer with a scale, and by checking which models have waterproof ratings, with a swim just to verify. To assess packability our testers took the speakers everywhere, stuffing them into backpacks, tote bags, and carry-on luggage, to see how easily they fit in with the essentials we were carrying around anyway.


The JBL Clip 3 is the most portable model we've ever tested. It tips the scales at only 7.5 ounces. For reference, a Galaxy S10+ is 6.2 ounces without a case, and an iPhone 11 is 6.8 ounces. It also has a built-in carabiner so you can easily hang it on the outside of your backpack or even on a belt loop. To top it all off, the IPX7 waterproof rating makes it the perfect companion for water-based activities.

The Bose Bose SoundLink Micro stays true to its name, weighing a scant 10.2 ounces and sporting a thin and packable physique. It is also completely IPX7 waterproof, meaning it will survive even if you drop it in the lake.

The impressively tiny JBL Clip 3.
The impressively tiny JBL Clip 3.

The Cambridge SoundWorks Oontz Angle was a close runner-up. It is the lightest model we tested at 9.4 ounces. Even though it is quite tiny, its triangular shape just doesn't slip into a pack as easily as some other models do. It also has an IPX5 rating, meaning it can withstand being hit by a pressurized stream of water, which is useful if you tend to get into a lot of super soaker fights. Both of these top-scoring models are light enough that they might find their way into your pack for extended hikes or even backpacking trips, assuming you're not too much of a minimalist.

The UE Wonderboom and both the Boom 2 and the Boom 3 are quite portable and durable. The Wonerboom is slightly more portable than the other two, weighing in at 15 ounces and boasting IPX7 waterproofness. Its short and stout shape also helps it disappear inside of a backpack. The Boom models are considerably taller, but the cylindrical shape still keeps them fairly low-profile when it comes to packing. They are a bit heavier at 22 ounces, and he Boom boasts an IP67 rating, which means it is both waterproof and dustproof.

The Tribit XSound Go is fairly light at 13.4 ounces and completely waterproof.
The Tribit XSound Go is fairly light at 13.4 ounces and completely waterproof.

The Tribit XSound Go weighs a relatively feathery 13.4 ounces and boasts total IPX7 waterproofness, meaning it can survive a dunking in a meter of water. We also found its rounded edges to make it a bit more amenable to being stuffed into a bag already full of soggy beach towels than many other speakers.

A slew of different models fell just behind these top performers in our portability testing. For the most part these models were waterproof (or at least water-resistant), and weigh more than 1 pound but less than 2 pounds. One such model is the UE Boom 2, which weighs in at 19.5 ounces and is completely IPX7 rated waterproof. The cylindrical shape also makes it fairly easy to stuff into a bag.

The Bose SoundLink Color II also weighs 19.5 ounces, putting it in the not too heavy but certainly not light category. The IPX4 water-resistant rating means it can repel most of the wetness associated with a day at the beach or on the lake, though it probably won't survive complete submersion. The rubber coating resists scratches and dings, and the flat shape is relatively packable.

The SoudLink Color is water resistant and rubber coated.
The SoudLink Color is water resistant and rubber coated.

The Bose SoundLink Revolve is nearly as portable as its rubber-coated sibling. At 24 ounces it is a bit heavier, but it still doesn't feel too hefty when carried in a backpack. It is also IPX4 water-resistant, and the brushed metal exterior and cylindrical shape generally allow it to slide into overstuffed bags with ease.

At just 13 ounces you barely notice you're carrying the Anker SoundCore 2, and its IPX4 water resistance lets you take it out even when the clouds are threatening. However, it lost some points because of the sharp edges, which make it a bit untenable when trying to shove it into an overstuffed bag.

Rounding out the above-average models in this metric, both the JBL Flip 4 and Flip 5 are 19 ounces and IPX7 waterproof. Both models would have performed better in this metric if it weren't for the sharp edges on the top and bottom of the speakers. We noticed these edges snagging on things whenever we tried to shove it into a bag. The newer Flip 5 is just a tad larger, but not so much as to be noticeable when shoving it into a bag.


Most of the rest of the models we tested were hampered in this metric due to a lack of any sort of water-resistant rating, which inevitably made us more reluctant to take them outside under anything other than bluebird skies. The most portable of these hydrophobic models is the Anker SoundCore 2. The Soundcore 2's rubberized exterior also lends more confidence that it can withstand minor drops and resist scratches.

We made sure all of our water resistant/proof models were in fact water resistant/proof. Pictured here are the JBL Charge 3 (front) and the (back  left to right) Cambridge SoundWorks Oontz  UE Roll 2  UE Boom 2  and Bose SoundLink Color II.
We made sure all of our water resistant/proof models were in fact water resistant/proof. Pictured here are the JBL Charge 3 (front) and the (back, left to right) Cambridge SoundWorks Oontz, UE Roll 2, UE Boom 2, and Bose SoundLink Color II.

The Bose Soundlink Revolve+ sports IPX4 water resistance, making it generally safe as a poolside companion. However, it clearly prioritizes volume over portability. Its 2 pound and 2 ounce frame makes it quite loud, but not particularly packable.

The Bose SoundLink Mini II was an average performer in our portability testing largely due to its heft at 24 ounces. It also sports a hard metal exterior without any sort of rubber coating, meaning it's more susceptible to scratches and possibly even dents. Finally, it lacks any sort of water resistance rating, and its sharp corners make it hard to slide into a loaded bag.

The Beats Pill+ also turned in an aerage performance this metric. Tipping the scales at 27 ounces, this speaker is very noticeable when carried in a backpack. It also lacks any sort of protective rubber on its exterior, and is not water-resistant to any degree. The pill shape, however, does make it a bit easier to shove into a loaded backpack.

The UE Boom 2 was the best sounding of the fully waterproof models we tested.
The UE Boom 2 was the best sounding of the fully waterproof models we tested.

The JBL Charge 3 and the newer JBL Charge 4 are both outliers in that they are IPX7 waterproof, but are so large that they aren't particularly portable. The Charge 3 is 28 ounces, and the Charge 4 is even heftier at 32 ounces. Both are too heavy to be reasonably carried long distances, but the waterproofing means both can handle campsites where beverage spilling might be a problem.

The Sony SRS-XB32 also tips the scales at a robust 32 ounces. Even IP67 dust and waterproof ratings couldn't save it from a mediocre assessment in our portability testing.

The Harman Kardon Onyx Studio 4 is hardly portable and dominated our volume testing.
The Harman Kardon Onyx Studio 4 is hardly portable and dominated our volume testing.

Volume


Producing enough sound for a couple of people lounging on the beach and enough sound for a barbecue with 20+ people are very different tasks. Some speakers just won't be able to cut it in the latter situation. We evaluated volume objectively with a sound meter. We found that most of the speakers were able to produce similar maximum decibel levels, but some sounded incredibly shrill at high volumes while others were able to retain their musicality. So we ended up rating them subjectively by listening to each speaker in different sized spaces to see which could fill a room with dulcet tones, and which just filled it with cringe-inducing dissonance.


The Bose Soundlink Revolve+ has the most punch of any of the models we tested. This speaker can really blow your hair back. It had no problem filling our testing apartment with sound, and could likely service a large backyard barbeque without having to max out the volume.

Somewhat unsurprisingly the largest speakers we tested, theJBL Charge 3 and the newer JBL Charge 4, were also some of the loudest. These models kept the music sounding good even when cranked up high, and could fill large, open houses with good sound.

The large Bose SoundLink Revolve+ is one of the loudest portable speakers we've tested.
The large Bose SoundLink Revolve+ is one of the loudest portable speakers we've tested.

Just a little quieter but still loud enough for backyard barbeques, the Sony XB20 and its sibling, the Sony SRS-XB32 were both top performers in this metric. Both these models have enough oomph to power a part of a large apartment but lack a bit of the over-the-top sound of the higher scoring models. The larger Sony SRS-XB32 is also noticeably louder than the smaller XB20.

For those looking for a smaller, more portable option that can still produce considerable volume there are a few options. The JBL Flip 4, the Flip 5, and the UE Boom 3 all can pump out a good amount of sound while being much smaller than most of the higher scoring models. These speakers easily produce enough volume to keep a group of people in an apartment dancing, but might be just a bit quiet for a larger party in an open space.

The Bose SoundLink Revolve and the Bose SoundLink Color II performed similarly. They have enough juice to power a small party and more than enough for a group of friends hanging out on the beach. The UE Wonderboom produced a similar volume level in our testing.

The JBL Charge 3's booming bass make it very loud  but somewhat to the detriment of overall clarity.
The JBL Charge 3's booming bass make it very loud, but somewhat to the detriment of overall clarity.

The Bose SoundLink Mini II and the Beats Pill+ were both able to fill our large testing apartment with sound. However, fill that apartment with a lot of bodies and the sound gets a bit dimmer. You can still notice the music, but it's not quite as loud.

The Bose SoundLink Micro, one of the smallest speakers in our testing, still did relatively well in our volume testing. It's incredibly loud given its size, but it isn't going to fill much more than a large hotel room with loud music.

The Beats Pill+ combines decent volume with great sound quality.
The Beats Pill+ combines decent volume with great sound quality.

The JBL Clip 3 performed similarly in our volume tests. When pushed to its maximum volume it sounds a bit strained and harsh. Even when played at a volume that didn't degrade the sound quality, however, it managed to fill up a moderately sized hotel room with sound.

When you get to the less expensive end of the portable speaker spectrum, you end up with models that aim only to be better and louder than your phone's built-in speakers, and not much more. We tested several models that fall into this category, including the Tribit XSound Go, the Anker SoundCore 2, and the Cambridge SoundWorks Oontz Angle 3. All of these devices are loud enough for a small group of friends listening to music on the beach, but struggle if the volume demands reach much beyond that.

The Anker SoundCore 2 lasted over 40 hours in our battery life testing.
The Anker SoundCore 2 lasted over 40 hours in our battery life testing.

Battery Life


Nothing can kill the mood of a gathering more than the music cutting out prematurely, so you want to make sure your speaker has enough juice to power you through. To test battery life we set each speaker to the same level of sound output, which worked out to about 75% volume for most models, and made them all play the same loop of music over and over until they died. We'd tell you which songs we played, but at this point we've heard them so much we can't even stand to utter their names…


Anker is probably best known for their portable battery packs, so it makes sense that the SoundCore 2 would win our battery life test. It lasted an almost ridiculous 42 hours on a single charge in our test. It got to the point that we thought maybe there was some sort of magical perpetual-motion machine inside.

The Anker set an almost unattainable bar, as the closest competitor in our tests was the JBL Charge 4. It well outlasted its specified battery life, pumping out music for a full 34.5 hours before it died. Its sibling, the JBL Charge 3, posted a similar performance, singing for 30 hours before giving way to entropy.

Another model that bested its specified runtime by a wide margin, the JBL Flip 5 played on for 27 hours on a single charge in our testing.

The UE Boom 3 and the Bose SoundLink Revolve+ lasted a full day in our test, both tapping out at the 24-hour mark.

Dropping back down into the teens, the UE Wonderboom posted an impressive 19.5-hour battery life. The inexpensive Tribit XSound Go was just behind the Wonderboom, lasting 18.5 hours before finally giving in to exhaustion.

The Charge 3 lasted 30 hours in out battery life test  and was the only model that could even come close to the performance of the Anker SoundCore.
The Charge 3 lasted 30 hours in out battery life test, and was the only model that could even come close to the performance of the Anker SoundCore.

The impressively small JBL Clip 3 lasted an equally impressive 18 hours before dying in our test, far outstripping its claimed battery life of 10 hours. That extra battery life greatly enhances the portability and usefulness of this speaker.

The inexpensive Cambridge Soundworks Oontz Angle 3 put up an impressive 15.5 hours of playback in our test. The JBL Flip 4's battery lagged just behind, dying after 15 hours. The melodious Bose SoundLink Color II posted an impressive 13-hour battery life. Rounding out the double-digits in our test was the UE Boom 2 and the Sony XB20, both of which lasted 12 hours.

The Bose Soundlink Micro's battery was only able to pump out music for 4.5 hours in our test, making it the worst overall performer. Although it's hard to blame such a small speaker for having so short of a battery life, the limited playtime for a particularly portable device feels a bit disappointing.

Conclusion


Bluetooth speakers are wonderful little devices that let you and your friends enjoy music almost anywhere you go. They are also incredibly diverse, with thousands of different models flooding the market. We hope our research and test results have helped you narrow the field to the few, or the one, speaker that will best satisfy your portable music needs.

Max Mutter and Steven Tata