Reviews You Can Rely On

Best Projector of 2021

Credit: Jenna Ammerman
By Max Mutter and Steven Tata  ⋅  Jan 28, 2021
Our Editors independently research, test, and rate the best products. We only make money if you purchase a product through our links, and we never accept free products from manufacturers. Learn more
We've conducted hands-on, side-by-side testing of more than 20 projectors in the past 4 years. In this update, we focus on the 10 best available today. We used all of these projectors in dark home theaters, living rooms with some ambient light, and bright conference rooms. Throughout it all, we projected one model right alongside another so that we could make direct comparisons of picture quality. We also paid attention to how easy each model is to set up, adjust, and generally use. Whether you're looking for something with a nuanced color palette for your home theater, or a light cannon that can create clear images while presenting in a bright room, this review can help you find the right model.

Top 10 Product Ratings

Displaying 1 - 5 of 10
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Awards Editors' Choice Award  Editors' Choice Award Best Buy Award  
Price $899 List
$790.00 at Amazon
$900 List$850 List$650 List$600 List
Overall Score Sort Icon
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72
69
65
62
Star Rating
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Pros Great image quality, vibrant colors, full HDVery good image quality, good color accuracy, full HDCrystal clear text, portable, bright lamp, full HDImpressive image quality, accurate colors, high resolutionGood image quality, full HD
Cons Dim lamp, not ideal for well lit roomsDim lamp, not ideal for well-lit roomsNot the best cinematic image qualityLow brightness, tiny remote controlWeak zoom, not very bright
Bottom Line Offering excellent image quality and a whisper-quiet fan, this is a fantastic home theater option and our favorite overallA great home theater machine, but not quite as good as the Editors' ChoicePerfect for business presentations, particularly if you want something that you can travel withA stellar mid-tier option with great picture quality at a relatively modest costGood image quality and a fairly quiet fan, can function well in a home theater setting
Rating Categories BenQ HT2150ST Epson Home Cinema... Epson Pro EX9220 BenQ HT1070A Optoma HD27
Image Quality (45%)
9
8
7
7
7
Ease Of Use (25%)
7
7
7
6
6
Brightness (15%)
4
6
8
4
4
Fan Noise (15%)
9
6
5
8
6
Specs BenQ HT2150ST Epson Home Cinema... Epson Pro EX9220 BenQ HT1070A Optoma HD27
Projection Technology DLP 3LCD 3LCD DLP DLP
Specification Brightness 2200 Lumens 2500 Lumens 3600 Lumens 2200 Lumens 3200 Lumens
Measured Brightness 1548 Lumens 1943 Lumens 2701 Lumens 1496 Lumens 1102 Lumens
Maximum Resolution 1080p 1080p 1920 x 1200 1080p 1080p
Contrast Ratio 15000:1 60000:1 15000:1 15000:1 25000:1
Apect Ratio Native 16:9 Native 16:9 Native 16:10 Native 16:9 Native 16:9
Zoom Ratio 1 - 1.2 1.0- 1.6 1.0- 1.2 1.0- 1.2 1.0-1.1
Throw Ratio (wide to zoom) 0.69 to 0.83 1.33 to 2.16 1.50 - 1.71 1.37 - 1.64 1.48 - 1.61
Backlit Remote Yes No No No Yes
Vertical Keystoning Correciton Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Horizontal Keystoning Correciton Yes Yes Yes No No
Lens Shift No No No No No
Dimensions 15" x 4.8" x 11" 12.2" x 11.2" x 4.8" 11.9" x 9.9" x 3.6" 13.1" x 3.9" x 9.5" 11.7" x 9" x 3.7"
Weight (pounds) 7.3 7.7 6.2 5.6 5.2
Warranty 3 Year Limited 2 Year Limited 2 Year Limited 1 Year Limited 1 Year Limited
Lens Cover Yes Yes Yes No Yes
3D Capable Yes Yes No Yes Yes


Best Overall Home Cinema Projector


BenQ HT2150ST


78
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Image Quality 9
  • Ease of Use 7
  • Brightness 4
  • Fan Noise 9
Resolution: 1080p | Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Great image quality
Vibrant colors
Full HD
Relatively short throw ratio
Dim lamp
Not ideal for well-lit rooms

It's hard to do much better than the BenQ HT2150ST when you're looking for a high-quality home theater centerpiece that stays out of quadruple-digit price tag territory. In our testing, it treated us to impeccable clarity and consistently vibrant colors, whether watching fast-paced action scenes or tranquil panoramic shots. Its fan is one of the quietest we've ever encountered, remaining barely noticeable even when the sound effects faded away and yielded to muted scenes of dialogue. Perhaps its best attribute is its relatively short throw ratio. This allows you to project an absolutely massive 150-inch image with the projector just over 8 feet from the screen. Most comparable models would need to be placed at least 14 feet from the screen in order to achieve the same picture size.

The relative dimness of the lamp is the only real downside to this model. We measured it at 1548 lumens, which is perfect in a darkened home theater but can feel a bit weak if you turn the lights on. If you're looking for a projector that can pull double duty for both presentations and movies, the HT2150ST isn't for you. However, this is our top recommendation if you're looking for a dedicated home theater machine.

Read review: BenQ HT2150ST

Best Projector for Business Applications


Epson Pro EX9220


69
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Image Quality 7
  • Ease of Use 7
  • Brightness 8
  • Fan Noise 5
Resolution: 1920 x 1200 (similar to 1080p) | Aspect Ratio: 16:10
Crystal clear text
Portable
Bright lamp
Full HD
Not the best cinematic image quality

The Epson Pro EX9220 offers full HD resolution, a fan that doesn't get too loud or annoying, and a powerful lamp that easily cuts through ambient light. This makes it perfect for presentations that require crystal clear photos or small yet legible text. With its included carrying case, you can even take its top-notch presenting capabilities wherever you go. Its color quality is good enough that it can even pull double duty as a home theater projector.

While its colors are fairly vibrant and accurate, the only downside of the EX9220 is that they aren't quite as good as some of the dedicated home theater models. There are better ways to spend your money if you're only going to use your projector in a home theater setting. However, if you want the best model for presentations that can also spruce up an occasional movie night, you can't go wrong with the EX9220.

Read review: Epson Pro EX9220

Best Bang for the Buck: Home Theater


BenQ HT1070A


65
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Image Quality 7
  • Ease of Use 6
  • Brightness 4
  • Fan Noise 8
Resolution: 1080p | Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Impressive image quality
Accurate colors
Full HD
Low brightness
Tiny remote control

Unfortunately, good home theater projectors don't come cheap. However, the BenQ HT1070A does get you more for your money than most models. Sporting a fairly average price tag, the HT1070A provides full HD 1080p resolution and good color vibrancy, a rarity in this price range. When you combine that with a whisper-quiet fan and easy adjustments, you've got a reasonably priced centerpiece for your home theater.

Although the HT1070A's image quality closely rivals that of high-priced models, we noticed that brighter areas of the image were slightly more washed out. Though the difference is minor, those looking for the absolute best picture quality will likely be happier spending a bit more on something like the HT2150ST. And while we wouldn't recommend any projectors' built-in speakers — even the best are lackluster — the HT1070A's speaker is horrible. If you're thinking about getting this projector, you'll want to make sure you have an external audio source.

Great Value for Slideshow Presentations


Epson VS250


50
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Image Quality 3
  • Ease of Use 6
  • Brightness 9
  • Fan Noise 5
Resolution: 800 x 600 (SVGA) | Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Bright lamp
Inexpensive
Not HD resolution
Fuzzy text
Noticeable fan noise

The bad news is that, to get high-definition resolution, you have to spend a considerable amount on a projector. The good news is that most PowerPoint-style presentations have large graphics and text that don't demand great resolution. That is where the Epson VS250 shines. For a more attractive price, you get a model with more than enough brightness to handle a well-lit conference room, plenty of resolution to get your point across, and a body that is small and light enough to easily carry from meeting to meeting as you make your pitch.

The VS250 is somewhat lackluster beyond slideshow presentations. Its resolution makes the smaller text look fuzzy, so it's not great for displaying long lines of code or Excel tutorials. It can also make movie watching a little less enjoyable with colors that lack some vibrancy and accuracy. But as an inexpensive machine for showing your presentations on the road, it's hard to beat.

Read review: Epson VS250

Best Affordable Portable Pico Projector


ViewSonic M1 Portable


49
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Image Quality 4
  • Ease of Use 8
  • Brightness 2
  • Fan Noise 5
Resolution: 854 x 480 | Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Relatively good image quality
Automatic keystone correction
Good audio quality
Finicky remote

In the world of portable, battery-powered projectors, the ViewSonic M1 offers one of the best balances of portability, quality, and user-friendliness that we've found. It provides decent picture quality for a sub-2-pound package, an easy setup thanks to automatic keystone correction and a built-in stand, and a speaker that's ready for showing movies in an epic location. Top that off with top-notch battery life of up to 6 hours, a multitude of input options, plus 8GB of internal storage, and you have a portable projector that can turn anyplace with a flat surface into a theater.

The most notable shortcoming of the M1 is the lack of built-in wireless capability. However, this deficiency can be rectified by plugging something like a FireStick or Roku into its USB port. The Anker Nebula Capsule is the only pico-sized model on the more affordable end of the price spectrum that offers native Wi-Fi connectivity, but it produces an inferior picture. Apart from the lack of Wi-Fi and the relative dimness inherent in pretty much all battery-powered models, the M1's only other annoyance is a remote that is tricky to operate. But this is usually a non-issue thanks to intuitive on-body controls. In most situations, you'll be doing most of the button pressing on whatever device you're using to play the media anyway.

Read review: ViewSonic M1 Portable

Compare Products

select up to 5 products to compare
Score Product Price Our Take
78
$899
Editors' Choice Award
Incredible image quality combined with a quiet fan make this the best option under $1000 for a home theater
72
$900
A good option for your budding home theater, but only if you can find it on sale
69
$850
Editors' Choice Award
HD clarity and a bright lamp make this the best sub $1000 option for business presentations
65
$650
Best Buy Award
Best home theater projector in its price range
62
$600
Combining good image quality and a reasonably quiet fan make this a good choice for home cinemas if you don't want to pay top dollar
58
$407
Bright WXGA model that works well in rooms with ambient light
50
$360
Best Buy Award
A great, inexpensive, and fairly portable option for basic slideshow presentations
49
$325
Top Pick Award
A great combination of portability and user-friendly touches that make for a great experience
39
$350
A nice set of features that are somewhat cancelled out in by a relative lack of audio-visual quality
39
$280
Image quality is good for a small model, but setup, use, and sound quality are subpar

Credit: Jenna Ammerman

Why You Should Trust Us


Max Mutter and Steven Tata have been leading TechGearLab's projector testing for three years, and in that time, they've had their hands on over 50 models. To fine-tune their testing process, they consulted with media professionals on such topics as color accuracy, contrast ratio, and resolution. The team also brings their own audio-visual expertise to the review, including multiple years spent testing camera drones, home security cameras, and instant cameras.

Our testing process involved spending 100s of hours projecting everything from movies to text-heavy PowerPoint presentations with every one of our projectors. We projected the same thing on multiple projectors in all of our image tests, side-by-side in the same room. This ensures that both lighting and projection conditions are entirely controlled. We also pushed them to the max by forcing them to project a bright white screen for extended periods, allowing us to take accurate brightness measurements and see how loud the fans get after each machine really heats up.

Analysis and Test Results



A Note on the Models We Selected


Projectors range from inexpensive pocket models that can run off a battery to multi-thousand dollar 4K behemoths that can rival the image quality you get in a real cinema. For this review, we narrowed our focus to models that cost 1 to 2 times what most people spend on a large-screen TV, since that is where most people looking to build a home theater will start.

Value


There is a close relationship between price and quality within the price range of the models we tested. Models close to the top of the price range, such as the BenQ HT2150ST and the Epson EX9220, offer superior home theater and presentation quality, respectively. However, some outliers offer better image quality than any other comparable model, like the reasonably priced BenQ HT1070A, or the Epson VS250, which provides adequate performance at a very low price.

A side by side comparison of the top home theater models we tested...
A side by side comparison of the top home theater models we tested. As you can see the BenQ HT2150ST (left) produces a slightly darker image that has a bit more definition in bright areas (look at the round sun). The Epson Home Cinema 2150 produces a lighter image, but loses some details in bright areas (look at the slightly washed out sun).
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

Image Quality


Image quality is mostly the domain of cinephiles. Although PowerPoint presentations will see mild improvement with better image quality, especially if they contain high-resolution images, a cinematic viewing is where you'll really notice more vibrant colors and sharper resolution. We watched several movies and scrolled through numerous HD photos before we began our testing to determine where different models struggled to produce stellar images. The biggest problem areas we discovered were color accuracy in high-resolution photos, movies that looked washed out, overall resolution, and odd skin tones (we can confirm that Matt Damon is much less attractive when it looks like he has a full-body sunburn).


We compared all the models' performance in these areas side by side. We used a dark room to test movies but chose to view images in both dark and well-lit rooms to simulate a photo slideshow or business presentation with photos. Most of the models offer endless options to adjust color, contrast, and brightness. However, we focused on the preset viewing modes that most people are more likely to use (i.e., cinema, bright, vivid) for our testing.

Although we wouldn't say that any of the models we tested have particularly poor image quality, there is a very noticeable difference between the top scorers and the low performers. The BenQ HT2150ST picked up the top score of 9 out of 10. It had the darkest, truest blacks, which also made all of the other colors pop. Even in lighter scenes, colors looked rich and vibrant, and skin tones always looked natural and accurate. It was also able to provide the best definition in bright scenes without washing out any details. Though ambient light did tend to wash colors out a bit, the BenQ HT2150ST is definitely our favorite model for a dark room.

The HT1070A tends to wash out some areas more than the HT2150ST...
The HT1070A tends to wash out some areas more than the HT2150ST (look at the face of the man on the far right), but otherwise produces an excellent image.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

Picking up an 8 out of 10 in our image quality scoring, the Epson Home Cinema 2150 came in just behind the BenQ. It matched the top scorers in almost all aspects — color quality, resolution, and contrast — but fell just short when it came to projecting bright scenes. It tends to make these sorts of scenes look just slightly washed out, with some detail being lost in white areas.

Falling just behind the top contenders are four models with an identical score of 7 out of 10. The most notable is the BenQ HT1070A. While it has some minor issues with washing out brighter areas, it still provides all of the color quality of the top models. We feel this is the least expensive way to get a "good" home theater projector.

Also in the 7 out of 10 camp are the Optoma HD27 and the Epson EX9220. The EX9220 lacks a bit of color vibrancy but produces a very crisp image. For a model that is geared for presentations, we were quite impressed with how well it performed as a home theater machine. This is our favorite if you're looking for a model that can pull double duty. The HD27 lacks a bit of color vibrancy and had particular trouble projecting in well-lit rooms compared to the top scorers.

The Epson EX9200 was far and away the best model we tested for...
The Epson EX9200 was far and away the best model we tested for projecting small text clearly.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

The ViewSonic PA503W received a 6 out of 10. In terms of color accuracy, it did a bit better than other models in its price range but displayed noticeable issues with washing out images. Even dark scenes exhibited an overly bright look to them. However, this did translate into relatively good performance when we tried it in a well-lit room.

Earning a 4 out of 10, the Epson VS250 is one of the worst performers in our image quality testing. Its SVGA (800x600) resolution is great for simple PowerPoint slides, but for movie watching, it is decidedly less than high definition. The colors were also slightly off, with many scenes taking on a bluish tint.

Most of the portable pico models we tested fell into the 3 or 4 out of 10 range in our image quality testing. These relatively low scores are to be expected because the limitations of battery-power necessitate a reduction in brightness that, compared to wired models, contributes to inferior image quality. That said, the Optoma LV130 and the ViewSonic M1 Portable came out towards the top in this class. Both models keep things looking clear despite less-than-HD resolutions and produce fairly vivid colors when used in very dark environments. Falling just behind its portable siblings, the Anker Nebula Capsule's picture is just a tad dimmer, and some focus issues meant that at least a portion of the screen tended to look a bit blurry.

A nice backlit remote, like the one for the BenQ HT2150ST, makes...
A nice backlit remote, like the one for the BenQ HT2150ST, makes adjusting setting much easier.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

Ease of Use


The hardest part of using a projector is getting its picture square on the screen and focused. This will either involve very fine adjustments of a few moving parts or some digital sorcery. Initial positioning like this is a major concern if you want a projector that can easily move from room to room. If you're looking for a dedicated home cinema machine, you'll likely only have to go through this process once, which means the remote control interface is more important than the initial setup process. We tested the user-friendliness of both of these aspects by setting up and breaking down each model multiple times, as well as navigating through all of their menu options with their associated remote controls.


One term you should be familiar with is keystoning. This refers to the trapezoidal shape a projected image takes on when the lens isn't perfectly square to the screen. We're referring to fixing this issue when we mention 'keystone correction' below.

With a score of 8 out of 10, the leading scorer in this metric is one of the portable pico models we tested. The Viewsonic M1 Portable offers automatic keystone correction and a built-in stand that makes setup a breeze. The only reason it didn't earn a higher score is that the remote doesn't seem to work at certain angles. Considering its lightning-fast setup, this feels like only a minor annoyance.



The top-performing home theater model in our user friendliness testing was the BenQ HT2150ST. Its remote had by far the most intuitive interface, and it is simple to switch between inputs and color modes. The buttons also have a red backlight that renders them easy to find in a dark room without making you feel like you are suddenly emerging into bright sunshine. The included vertical keystone correction and large zoom are easy to use and make it a breeze to get the image square and the correct size. Its vertical lens shift is a huge plus when installing a permanent mount in a home theater. Finally, its throw ratio of 0.69 to 0.83 is shorter than that of most other comparable models, allowing you to create a huge 150-inch image with the projector just about 8 feet from the screen, whereas most models would need to be at least 14 feet away to do the same. This allows for more versatile mounting options in smaller rooms without sacrificing screen size.

Front legs that adjust with small threaded screws &amp;#40;left&amp;#41;...
Front legs that adjust with small threaded screws (left) take a lot of turning to adjust. Large threaded screws (middle) are much faster. Legs that adjust via a button and latch mechanism (right) are the fastest and easiest to use, but the preset heights mean you do sacrifice some adjustability.
Credit: Katherine Elliott

Earning a score of 7 out of 10, the Epson Home Cinema 2150 was even with the BenQ in this metric. Its vertical and horizontal keystone correction makes setup easy and even offers vertical lens shift. However, its remote has tiny buttons that can be a bit frustrating sometimes.

The BenQ remote &amp;#40;left&amp;#41; is much larger than most of the...
The BenQ remote (left) is much larger than most of the competitors.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

In our ease of use testing, five of the models we tested picked up an average score of 6. These models had varying drawbacks that made them slightly more difficult to use than the top scorer. The remote for the Optoma HD27 is fairly easy to use, but its buttons are backlit so brightly that it gave us a deer in headlights feeling when used in a dark room. The Epson VS250 is easy to set up, but its remote can sometimes be frustratingly unintuitive. The Epson EX9220 is very portable but also has a small-buttoned, slightly frustrating remote. We found that its wireless connectivity was hard to use, but we didn't knock the score too much for that because it's the only model we tested that offers such a feature. The BenQ HT1070A is very easy to adjust, but as it's a bit large and clunky, you definitely won't want to use it as a portable model. The remote is also very small, making it easy to press the wrong button.

The built-in stand of the ViewSonic M1 &amp;#40;center&amp;#41; made it the...
The built-in stand of the ViewSonic M1 (center) made it the easiest to set up of all the portable pico models we tested.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

The only portable model in our test fleet that earned a 6 out of 10 here was the Anker Nebula Capsule. Its built-in streaming capability makes it much easier to access media with it than with other pico models. However, it's quite hard to get the entire picture in focus, which caused it to lose some points. It also has no inherent position adjustments, so you have to get a tripod if there isn't a flat surface at the correct height available.

The EX9220&#039;s easily adjustable leg.
The EX9220's easily adjustable leg.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

The ViewSonic PA503W received a low score of 5. This model lacks adjustable back feet, which can be very frustrating if the surface you put the projector on doesn't happen to be perfectly level.

This metric's worst scorer is the Optoma LV130, earning a 4 out of 10. This portable model has automatic keystone correction but lacks an easy way to tilt and reposition the projector. The additional lack of a remote control makes the setup even more challenging.

The Epson VS250 is the brightest of the projectors we tested.
The Epson VS250 is the brightest of the projectors we tested.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

Brightness


Brighter is generally better in the world of projectors. You can always make an overly bright image softer, but if a lamp's full capacity produces an image that's too pale, it can't be made any brighter. Top-end brightness usually isn't an issue in a dark home cinema setting. In fact, most models have a cinema mode that dims the lamp to provide more vivid colors and truer blacks. Top-end brightness becomes a bigger issue when projecting in well-lit rooms, the most common scenario being a business presentation in a conference room. In this situation, you want to be sure text and graphs are crisp, easy to read, and not washed out. To do this, the lamp must be bright enough to ward off miscreant photons from ambient light that like to bounce around rooms at random, fading colors and washing out text. Accordingly, most of our brightness testing involved viewing Excel sheets and PowerPoint presentations in a bright room. We also measured brightness using a lux meter and compared our measurements to the manufacturers' claims. Across the board, particularly in the Optoma models, the brightness we measured was lower than the manufacturers' claim.


Brightness is one area where an inexpensive model, the Epson VS250, reigned supreme. Producing 2847 lumens in our testing, it was the brightest model by a decent margin. This resulted in graphs and PowerPoint slides looking full and not washed out, even when the ambient light level was high.

Although the brightest model we tested was a fairly inexpensive one, we found you still have to pay if you want brightness and clarity. Case in point, the more expensive Epson Pro EX9220 nearly matched the brightness of the VS250 (2701 lumens), but its image is noticeably crisper. This model is an excellent choice if you're looking to project relatively small text in a well-lit room.

The superior brightness of the Epson VS250 &amp;#40;left&amp;#41; made it...
The superior brightness of the Epson VS250 (left) made it much better at cutting through ambient light that the more home cinema oriented models.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

Producing a respectable 2588 lumens, the ViewSonic PA503W came in just behind the top scorers in our brightness tests. We found that it could handle even very bright rooms without its picture fading out. The WXGA resolution also made its text look much less fuzzy than that of the Epson VS250, but it still couldn't match the clarity of the Epson Pro EX9220.

Credit: Jenna Ammerman

Earning a score of 6 out of 10, the Epson Home Cinema 2150 produced 1943 lumens in our testing. Its performance in our well-lit conference room was mediocre. While text and graphs were legible, they looked noticeably dim.

Home cinema gears models tend to add blueish tints to white areas...
Home cinema gears models tend to add blueish tints to white areas when used in a lit room, as you can see above.

After the top scorers, there is a steep dropoff to the bottom group in this metric, all of which scored 4 out of 10 in our brightness testing. We measured all of these models to be in the 1100 to 2000 lumen range. This makes them great for home theater use, but less than ideal for using in a room with a lot of ambient light. We measured the Optoma HD27 at just about 1300 lumens, which was well below the manufacturer claims of 3000 lumens. Ambient light exacerbated the red tint the Optoma lends to images, leaving most skin tones looking unnaturally red. They also struggled to overcome ambient light during normal PowerPoint presentations, giving a blue tint to white areas and making text and graphs look dull and washed out. The BenQ HT2150ST had similar issues but to a greater degree. It left white areas looking very blue, and text and graphs looking quite faded. While these dimmer models have some noticeable color distortion when used in a bright room, none of them look terrible. We've used the dimmest model, the BenQ HT2150ST, in our office meetings and found its performance passable.

It comes as no surprise that portable pico models fared the worst in our brightness testing. Powering a lamp with a sensibly sized battery greatly limits the lumens it will be able to push out. The ViewSonic M1 Portable ended up being the most powerful of this group, producing 124 lumens. The Optoma LV130 is a close second at 120 lumens, and the Anker Nebula Capsule lags a bit at 98 lumens. Bottom line, all of these models are only suited for use in dark rooms or possibly outside on a dark night.

Fan Noise


Projectors in general and their bulbs, in particular, are often referred to as "light cannons," and like this moniker's namesake, those bulbs produce a lot of heat. This necessitates some sort of cooling system to keep the projector from frying itself — usually a fan. In turn, that fan will produce some noise, possibly even enough noise to ruin the dramatic weight of a long moment of silence. Similarly, during an important presentation, an incessant hum can annoy clients, which isn't going to help you make your point. To assess fan noise, we conducted a real-world test of watching a film at a normal volume to see how often we actually noticed the fan's whir. We also put the projectors through a heat torture test that involved projecting a bright white screen for half an hour and precisely measuring each fan's maximum volume.


The fan noise test produced the widest spread of scores in any metric, ranging from 2 to 9. The BenQ HT2150ST was the clear winner, picking up the top score of 9. Its fan quietly purred along like an inconspicuous cat. The noise remained docile, even when we pushed the lamp to get as hot as possible. Its smaller sibling, the BenQ HT1070A, also has a quiet fan, earning it a score of 8 out of 10. Its fan is just slightly more noticeable than the HT2150ST's when the movie hits a quiet scene, but it still wasn't detrimental at all to the movie-watching experience.

The BenQ&#039;s fan barely makes any noise at all.
The BenQ's fan barely makes any noise at all.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

Most models fell into the mid-range of our fan noise testing, scoring between 4 and 6. These models had subtle differences in fan noise, but in general, they were not loud enough to be particularly grating. All were loud enough to be noticed occasionally, but most people won't be bothered by the fans on these models. However, if you're especially sensitive to noise and refuse to sleep at your grandparents' place because the ticking of the grandfather clock keeps you up all night, you'll want to opt for one of the higher scoring models. Both Optoma models scored 6 out of 10, with fans that generally weren't obtrusive except during extended use or exceptionally bright scenes.

The Epson EX9220 scored a 5. It was generally quiet, but you could hear the fan ramp up after it had been projecting bright images for 20-30 minutes. The Epson VS250 performed similarly. Its fan was quiet enough that it wouldn't disrupt a presentation, but you might notice it at some point.

All of the portable models we tested, the ViewSonic M1 Portable, the Optoma LV130, and the Anker Nebula Capsule, also earned scores of 5 out of 10 in this metric. The fans generally aren't loud, but their small size makes them a bit higher pitched. We were generally able to forget about the fans a few minutes into a movie, but they are certainly audible.

The ViewSonic PA503W earned a 4 out of 10. Its fan is quite noticeable, especially during presentations that use slides with bright white backgrounds. We still feel you can conduct a meeting without the fan disrupting anything, but you're definitely going to notice it.

A Note on Input Lag


Input lag, or the amount of time that lapses between pressing a button on a controller and seeing the result on the screen, is an important factor for video game aficionados, as even a millisecond of hesitation can mean digital life or death. We first tested input lag objectively using a dedicated input lag meter. Those measurements showed minor differences between models, so we moved on to a real-world test, bringing a cadre of avid gamers into our testing theater. Those gamers didn't notice a difference in input lag between models, and none believed any model supplied enough input lag to be a detriment to their game playing. Therefore, gamers need not worry about input lag when looking at the projects we tested.

Testing input lag by playing video games side by side. None of our...
Testing input lag by playing video games side by side. None of our resident gamers were able to discern a difference between any of the models.
Credit: Katherine Elliott

A Note on 3D Quality


Today, most projectors on the market are compatible with 3D media players, allowing you to bring 3D cinema into your home theater. However, 3D images force projectors into a specified image mode, somewhat dampening the individual image quality of different models and lessening their differences. We confirmed this in our testing, finding little if any 3D image quality differences across many models. Therefore, we did not consider 3D image quality in our final rankings.

Conclusion


Home theaters are becoming more and more affordable, and thus more and more common. Despite becoming more accessible, projectors are still rife with arcane specifications and confusing marketing claims. We hope that our objective side-by-side tests have helped you cut through all of the noise and find the perfect projector to bring movie watching nirvana into your living room.

Max Mutter and Steven Tata