Reviews You Can Rely On

Best Rain Gauge of 2022

From AcuRite to La Crosse to Stratus, we weathered winds and rains to find the best option for your water measuring needs
Best Rain Gauge of 2022
Credit: Clark Tate
By Clark Tate ⋅ Senior Review Editor  ⋅  Jul 26, 2022
Our Editors independently research, test, and rate the best products. We only make money if you purchase a product through our links, and we never accept free products from manufacturers. Learn more

To find the best rain gauge for you, we researched 20 digital and manual options before buying the top 11 to test side-by-side. To find a gauge that is a cinch to install, easy to read, and measures rainfall accurately and precisely, we put these models through the wringer. It rained for weeks through several multi-day tropical rainstorms, and we checked them every morning. Armed with our research and notes from these direct comparisons, we discovered which are the easiest to use and which provide the most useful information. From data-intensive digital options to precise manual gauges, we highlight the best choices for various needs.

Our home & garden experts aim to help you make the most of your space. Whether you want to break ground on a new garden, set up a new bird feeder and fill it with the best bird seed available, or simply kick back in a comfortable lawn chair, we have you covered with round-ups and in-depth reviews of the best products on the market.

Top 11 Product Ratings

Displaying 1 - 5 of 11
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Awards Editors' Choice Award Top Pick Award  Editors' Choice Award  
Price $38 List
$31.83 at Amazon
$45 List$42 List$50 List
$42.99 at Amazon
$66 List
$59.99 at Amazon
Overall Score Sort Icon
94
88
83
79
78
Star Rating
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Pros No entry point for insects, larger opening increases accuracy, easy to readProvides more information, self-emptyingEasy to use, includes a rain alarm, empties itselfLarge capacity, precise, durable plastic, large diameter for accuracyTons of information, wide catchment, debris filter
Cons More complicated interfaceHarder to set up and navigate, smaller opening, housing attracts bugsSmall opening is less accurate, bugs move inTakes effort and coordination to read, easy to spill waterWe had trouble with pairing, difficult to mount
Bottom Line A large opening and secure catchment increases accuracy with this sturdy digital gaugeThis digital gauge gives you a ton of information but makes you work for it a littleThis straightforward digital gauge makes it easy to monitor the weather from inside your homeAccurate and precise with a large capacity, its great for your backyard or remote locationsThe overly complicated monitor kept us from enjoying the daily weather check
Rating Categories La Crosse Technolog... AcuRite Wireless 00899 AcuRite 02446M Wire... Stratus Precision W... Ecowitt WH5360B Hig...
Accuracy (25%)
9.0
7.0
7.0
8.0
10.0
Precision (25%)
10.0
10.0
9.0
9.0
10.0
Ease of Use (25%)
9.0
10.0
9.0
6.0
4.0
Measuring Capacity (15%)
10.0
10.0
10.0
8.0
10.0
Debris and Durability (10%)
9.0
5.0
5.0
9.0
3.0
Specs La Crosse Technolog... AcuRite Wireless 00899 AcuRite 02446M Wire... Stratus Precision W... Ecowitt WH5360B Hig...
Opening Size 6.9" x 4.5" 3" x 2.4" 3" x 2.4" 4" across 7.19" across
Increments and Units 0.01 inches, 0.1 mm 0.01 inches, 0.1 mm 0.01 inches, 0.2 mm 0.01 inches 0.01 inches, 0.1 mm
Measuring Capacity Unlimited Unlimited Unlimited 11 inches Unlimited
Battery needs 2 x AA 3 x AA 3 x AAA None 3 x AA in base, 1 x AA in outdoor sensor
Mount Type 4 screws, horizontal base 2 screws, horizontal base 2 screws, horizontal base 4 screws, vertical bracket Poel mount


Best Digital Rain Gauge


La Crosse Technology 724-1409 Digital


94
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Accuracy 9.0
  • Precision 10.0
  • Ease of Use 9.0
  • Measuring Capacity 10.0
  • Debris and Durability 9.0
Capacity: Unlimited | Measuring Interval: 0.01 inches, 0.1 mm
REASONS TO BUY
Get rain measurements from inside your house
Large opening increases accuracy
Well-built base keeps bugs out
Longer range
REASONS TO AVOID
More complicated to set up
More expensive than analog options
Instruction manual is less comprehensive

Regarding rain gauges, larger catchment areas make for more accurate readings. The La Crosse Wireless Rain Station has one of the largest in the test. Like all digital rain gauges, it has an outside sensor and an indoor display. The sensor consists of a housing that protects two seesawing cups. They take turns filling with water, tipping over, and spilling it out. The sensor wirelessly sends that information to the indoor display. We like digital gauges because they empty themselves, they capture more data than manual options, and you can check them indoors. The La Crosse version tallies rain totals by the event, hour, day, week, month, and year. It reads rainfall in inches or millimeters and temperature in Celsius or Fahrenheit. This is the highest-scoring digital option, thanks to its accuracy and sturdy housing that keeps insects from meddling with the sensors.

Setting up the display is straightforward — just dial in the time, day, month, year, and preferred units. Then decide if you want an alarm to sound when it rains and how much rain needs to fall to trigger it. You can choose in 0.1-inch increments. You also need to pair the outdoor sensor and the indoor display, which can be a finicky process. The sensor must be within 300 feet of the display, the largest range of any digital gauge in the test. The La Crosse's indoor display is not as user-friendly as we'd like. It deletes your data quickly, rolling over the moment the hour, day, week, month, or year is over. You'll need discipline and a separate spreadsheet if you want to keep long-term records. If you want to monitor the rain without standing in it, we recommend this gauge for its security and accuracy.

best digital rain gauge
Credit: Clark Tate

Best Analogue Rain Gauge


Stratus Precision With Mounting Bracket


79
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Accuracy 8.0
  • Precision 9.0
  • Ease of Use 6.0
  • Measuring Capacity 8.0
  • Debris and Durability 9.0
Capacity: 11 inches | Measuring Interval: 0.01 inches
REASONS TO BUY
Generous capacity
4-inch diameter opening for accuracy
Precise measurements
Thick, durable plastic
REASONS TO AVOID
Takes effort to read
Easy to spill some water

If you need precise rain measurements further from your house, the Stratus Precision Gauge is your best bet. The opening is just over four inches, a minimum benchmark for the most accurate rain gauge. It's made of sturdy plastic and is large enough to hold 11 inches of rain for even severe storms. Its double-cylinder measuring system provides excellent precision. The inner cylinder measures just one inch of rain to the nearest hundredth. After the first inch, water spills into the larger one. To measure the spillover, dump the first inch and pour the rest into the small cylinder, inch by inch. The lid serves as a funnel to help prevent spills. The mounting plate is straightforward and secure, and the cylinder slides out easily to take a measurement. This gauge is the only option we tested that works in the winter. Remove the funnel and inner tube to capture snow or hail, then melt and measure it.

This gauge requires patience and care if you need precise measurements. But it's fun — for our nerdy testers anyway — to carefully measure each drop. The key is pouring the water slowly, so you don't overfill the funnel and inner cylinder and spill a portion of the rain. If you don't mind working for it, this sturdy, high-volume gauge will reward you with accurate and precise readings.

best analogue rain gauge
The Stratus gauges makes it relatively easy (and we would argue, fun) to measure rain to one-hundredth of an inch.
Credit: Clark Tate

Best Bang for Your Buck


La Crosse Easy Read 5-Inch


67
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Accuracy 5.0
  • Precision 7.0
  • Ease of Use 9.0
  • Measuring Capacity 5.0
  • Debris and Durability 7.0
Capacity: 5 inches | Measuring Interval: 0.1 inches
REASONS TO BUY
Easy to read
Very easy to install
Measuring interval is intuitive
REASONS TO AVOID
Smaller opening is less accurate
On-the-ground placement is less accurate

It's hard to think of an easier way to set up a rain gauge. Just plant the La Crosse Easy Read's four-inch plastic spike in the ground and be done with it. While we installed it in the dirt, you can hang the gauge almost as easily on two screws. Placing it higher would make it easier to read without removing it, but you'll have to pick it up to dump it anyway, so we didn't mind. The water magnifies the measurement numbers, making it even easier for our testers to read the measurements. We also like that the Easy Read marks off every tenth of an inch.

Since this gauge is easy to place in the ground, it's more likely that you'll place it near vegetation that could shield it from some rainfall, particularly if it's windy. Combine this possibility with the reality that the semi-circle opening measures just 3.1 inches by 1.3 inches, and you're not giving the rain much room to enter. So it's not the most accurate gauge available. Still, it gives you a good idea of rain totals with minimum fuss. And we love that you can move it around your property without remounting a bracket. The best rain gauge is one that you'll use, especially when it comes at an accessible price.

rain gauge - best bang for your buck
We love how simple it is to place these spike gauges. They are also very easy to read, when you pick them up.
Credit: Clark Tate

Best Information Breakdown


AcuRite Wireless 00899


88
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Accuracy 7.0
  • Precision 10.0
  • Ease of Use 10.0
  • Measuring Capacity 10.0
  • Debris and Durability 5.0
Capacity: Unlimited | Measuring Interval: 0.01 inches or 0.1 mm
REASONS TO BUY
Captures more data than the rest
Includes a flood watch alarm
Self-emptying means an endless capacity
REASONS TO AVOID
Smaller opening may be wind affected
Not as user-friendly and shorter range

The AcuRite Wireless 00899 outdoor sensor and indoor monitor affords you the luxury of checking rain totals without stepping outside. It's also self-draining. Meanwhile, the indoor monitor provides a wealth of information. Like the other digital options, it tracks rain totals for the event, day, and week. The difference is that it stores those totals longer, holding information about the last seven rain events, days, and weeks. It also gives you two tracking modes (called Total A and Total B) that you can control. They begin tracking totals when you turn the gauge on and only stop if you power it off or clear the mode. That means you can track by the month, season, year, or whatever interval is meaningful to you. We appreciate having the extra time to check or record rainfall.

The gauge does have a rain alarm, but only one setting for it. It goes off for a full minute when the rain starts, which is annoying if you're asleep. Other models let you set a threshold, like 0.5 inches before the alarm sounds. This one has a similar feature with a separate Flood Watch Alarm. This tracks several predetermined scenarios (for example, 1.4 inches of rainfall in the last 2 hours) that are likely to saturate soils, making floods more likely. This seven-button monitor does take longer to figure out, and you have to keep the monitor and sensor within 100 feet of one another. But it stores more data and gives you more control over it than the other digital gauges. If you're willing to work a little in dry weather to stay indoors when it's wet, this is a good bet.

rain gauge - best information breakdown
The AcuRite gauge is easy to secure with two included screws.
Credit: Clark Tate

Easiest to Read


EZRead Jumbo With Float


61
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Accuracy 8.0
  • Precision 4.0
  • Ease of Use 7.0
  • Measuring Capacity 5.0
  • Debris and Durability 6.0
Capacity: 5 inches | Measuring Interval: 0.25 inches
REASONS TO BUY
Makes tracking rainfall a piece of cake
Simple to hang and use
Wide opening makes it more accurate
REASONS TO AVOID
Thin plastic is not as durable

The EZRead Jumbo gauge is aptly named. The manufacturer claims that you can read its oversized numbers from up to 50 feet away, and we confirmed it. As such, it is a good option if you want a manual gauge that you can read without stepping outside. Just place it by a window, and you're good to go. The mount requires four screws and a wooden post. When you empty it, which you should do daily in the morning if you're tracking daily totals, simply pinch the plastic holder out of a loop below the mount, pull out the plastic tube, and dump it. The small strainer holes that keep debris out also slow the water down as you pour, but it's still quick. The funnel is over four inches wide, which means it's among the most accurate manual gauges.

Unfortunately, the gauge doesn't provide very precise measurements to go along with that accuracy. It measures rainfall totals at quarter-inch intervals. Many of the other options measure to the nearest tenth or hundredth. The other downside is that the plastic is very thin. Our lead tester had one of these rain gauges growing up. The numbers faded, and the funnel cracked under the UV exposure in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia. It happened over five-or-so years, but if you live in a high UV location (or just like your tools to last), you may want to go with a more durable option. If you're in a low-lying location with plenty of atmosphere and lots of cloudy days, we think you'll enjoy this straightforward gauge longer.

rain gauge - we love how true the ezread gauge is to its name. and, don&#039;t worry...
We love how true the EZRead gauge is to its name. And, don't worry, the gauge is level, we made sure after we botched the angle of our patented wooden hanger.
Credit: Clark Tate

Compare Products

select up to 5 products to compare
Score Product Price Our Take
94
$38
Editors' Choice Award
A large opening and secure catchment increases accuracy with this sturdy digital gauge
88
$45
Top Pick Award
This digital gauge gives you a ton of information but makes you work for it a little
83
$42
This straightforward digital gauge makes it easy to monitor the weather from inside your home
79
$50
Editors' Choice Award
Accurate and precise with a large capacity, its great for your backyard or remote locations
78
$66
The overly complicated monitor kept us from enjoying the daily weather check
73
$40
A precision gauge that holds plenty of waterm but it seems less durable than our favorite option
67
$10
Best Buy Award
This simple, inexpensive gauge uses water to magnify measurements to one-tenth of an inch
61
$26
Top Pick Award
True to its name, this huge rain gauge is a cinch to read
58
$16
It's easy to use, but measures every eighth inch of rainfall, making for awkward math
58
$25
This sturdy gauge measures rainfall in millimeters, but a small opening decreases accuracy
51
$16
The unique design is appealing, but its shape makes it hard for rain to fall in

it&#039;s best to check rain totals early in the day before they begin to...
It's best to check rain totals early in the day before they begin to evaporate.
Credit: Clark Tate

Why You Should Trust Us


Clark Tate has been fascinated by the weather since a tornado rounded the bases of her elementary school's tee-ball diamond while she huddled in the basement next door. And, when you're raised in a family of farmers like she was, you're always watching the weather. She earned a master's degree in environmental science, which included a meteorology course where she poured over topics like moist adiabatic lapse rates. And, she can certainly tell when it's raining.

After researching rain gauge design and options on the market, we ordered the top products and sent them to Clark. She mounted the monitors around her garden/mini-farm to keep them away from the influences of trees and buildings. She then took readings every morning during two multi-day tropical storms. After measuring each gauge's opening to understand how well they capture rain in windy weather, she paid close attention to how easy it was to read and record the measurements from each contender. She also noted how simple or challenging each one was to take down and empty. For the three digital and wireless sensors, she scrolled through their measurement options and compared their ease of use. She then scrutinized the construction of each one to see how long they were likely to last.

The Status came with its own rain monitoring sheet.
The Status came with its own rain monitoring sheet.
To measure the rain using the Straus, simply pour the water from the...
To measure the rain using the Straus, simply pour the water from the outer cylinder into the measurement cylinder using the included funnel.
How many rain gauges does one garden need?
How many rain gauges does one garden need?

Analysis and Test Results


We love tracking rainfall. How cool is it that free, clean water falls from the sky? Monitoring it well can tell you everything from how often you should water your garden to which rivers will likely run. Keep reading to find the right tool to start or continue your weather-watching journey as we dissect the key performance metrics used to evaluate each model with hands-on testing.

​​

Value


After we test how well each rain gauge performs, we look back at how much each one costs to help you find a good value. In this test, there are several. The La Crosse Easy Read 5-Inch gauge is as simple as they come, with a price to match. Easy to read and mount (just stick it in the ground like a stake), it's one of the quickest and least expensive ways to start watching your weather.

The Easy Read doesn't give you much precision, though, and the options that do cost more. For example, the Stratus Precision Gaugeis a manual gauge that costs more than several digital options. It's one of the most accurate gauges in the test, offers very precise readings, works far from any power source, is highly durable, and is the only gauge we tested that works in the winter. So it might be worth the cost if that's what you need. The La Cross digital gauge also offers a great value, earning the highest score in the test at a mid-range price point.

rain gauge - rainfall totals can change from location to location, so we test our...
Rainfall totals can change from location to location, so we test our gauges as close together as possible.
Credit: Clark Tate

Accuracy


Rainfall varies by micro-location, and one gauge placed within a few meters of another may give you a different reading. Wind can also affect your results by blowing rain sideways against your gauge instead of letting it fall into it. According to Cornell University's Network for Environment and Weather Applications (NEWA) manual, gauges with a four-inch diameter or more are highly accurate. Gauges with an eight-inch diameter are the gold standard used by the National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration, but they are more expensive, awkward, and rare.


Regarding the manual gauges we tested, the Stratus Precision, Outback Blue, and EZRead Jumbo gauges have a four-inch collection diameter. We expect these to be plenty accurate for home garden or landscape upkeep needs.

the size of a rain gauge&#039;s opening has a lot to do with its...
The size of a rain gauge's opening has a lot to do with its accuracy. Openings of at least four inches, like the Stratus show here, are accepted as quite accurate.
Credit: Clark Tate

Two of the digital gauges offer even more impressive catchment areas. The Ecowitt Digital has a collection disk measuring 7.2 inches across. The La Crosse digital's oval-shaped opening measures 4.5 inches by 6.9 inches. Those larger entryways will be less affected by wind and minor variations in rainfall. The openings of the two AcuRite sensors measure only 4 inches by 2.5 inches and can not offer the same level of accuracy. That said, the manual and digital gauges were comparable during our tests, measuring within one-hundredth of an inch of each other.

Accuracy: To get the most accurate readings, mount the top of your rain gauge above the attached structure. Six inches of clearance is best. Also, be sure it is not close to buildings, tall trees, or shrubs. Ideally, position the gauge at a distance twice as far as the nearest obstruction's height. At the same time, try to protect the gauge from wind effects by placing it on the leeward side of a nearby fence post or low-lying bushes.

Record measurements at the same time of day to get the most accurate readings. The morning is best before evaporation ramps up for the day. Then dump the gauge if you need to. The OutdoorHome gauge recommends that you get two gauges to place about 20 feet apart so you can average the readings in case one is affected by factors like wind.

bugs can clog a digital gauge&#039;s sensor, affecting accuracy.
Bugs can clog a digital gauge's sensor, affecting accuracy.
Credit: Clark Tate

Unlike manual gauges, the accuracy of digital gauges is more complex than just their catchment areas. The mechanical and electrical systems must also be working well and are known to drift over time. The AcuRite versions give detailed instructions for recalibrating them when this occurs. The Ecowitt and La Crosse do not.

If you opt for a digital gauge, NEWA recommends getting an inexpensive manual backup. Compare them from time to time to see if your digital gauge needs a recalibration.

NEWA does assure us that even manual gauges that aren't four inches in diameter are fairly accurate and that accuracy is mostly a function of the user. It's important to place your rain gauge well and to read it carefully. For that reason, we expect the OutdoorHome, AcuRite Easy Read, and La Crosse Easy Read to be accurate enough to manage your landscaping or garden as well.

the outback blue gauge has a 4-inch opening, increasing its accuracy.
The Outback Blue gauge has a 4-inch opening, increasing its accuracy.
Credit: Clark Tate

Precision


Of course, even if your gauge is incredibly accurate, if its measurement increments are not very precise, the information you gather will be limited.


The digital gauges prioritize precision and are as easily read as a digital watch. All of them measure rainfall to one one-hundredth of an inch. All measure millimeters of rainfall to the nearest tenth, except for the AcuRite 02446M Wireless, which measures to the nearest hundredth.

the four-inch-wide opening and one-hundredth of an inch measurement...
The four-inch-wide opening and one-hundredth of an inch measurement increments make the Stratus both accurate and precise.
Credit: Clark Tate

As for the manual gauges, the Stratus and Outback Blue options measure rainfall to the nearest hundredth of an inch. The Outback also provides measurements to the nearest quarter of a millimeter. It's an awkward increment, but at least it's metric. It makes sense that these options would be more precise since they are also likely to be more accurate.

the acurite wireless measures rainfall to one-hundredth of an inch.
The AcuRite wireless measures rainfall to one-hundredth of an inch.
Credit: Clark Tate

The less accurate La Crosse Easy Read also takes a step back in precision, measuring every tenth of an inch. The EZRead Jumbo, which should be quite accurate, reads out every quarter of an inch, bucking the trend. Of course, it's prioritizing big, easy-to-see increments, so that makes sense. While these gauges are less precise, we still enjoy them for a quick and easy look at what the weather is doing.

The OutdoorHome gauge is fairly precise if you use the metric system, as each demarcation is one millimeter. Reading the OutdoorHome and AcuRite Easy Read in inches is awkward since they are broken into unconventional fractions.

the la crosse easy read is just that. the water magnifies the...
The La Crosse Easy Read is just that. The water magnifies the numbers and tick marks.
Credit: Clark Tate

Ease of Use


Using digital monitors involves more work up front, but they are easier to use day-to-day, mostly because they empty themselves. The manual monitors require a few screws to install, but you must dump them and record data (if you care to) every time it rains.


If you're looking for a digital option, the AcuRite and La Crosse gauges are easier to set up and use than the Ecowitt. The two AcuRite models use just two screws to secure them to a flat wooden base. The La Crosse takes four.

the stratus takes a few more steps to read, but it&#039;s a smooth process.
The Stratus takes a few more steps to read, but it's a smooth process.
Credit: Clark Tate

You need to find a pole that is the proper size to attach the Ecowitt's baseplate and then screw on its somewhat awkward disk. Otherwise, as long as the Ecowitt's sensor is functional (the first one we received was not), adding batteries and pairing both devices is relatively straightforward.

Regarding reading data from the digital options, the AcuRite 02446 is the most intuitive. It cycles easily through the most important information, namely the daily, weekly, and monthly totals. The other options take more time to get used to. Like the manual gauges, if you don't check the accumulations daily, they are lost in the amalgamation of weekly or monthly totals. Except for the AcuRite 00899, which stores the data for seven days.

The La Crosse digital gauge is easy enough to read as the rain falls.
The La Crosse digital gauge is easy enough to read as the rain falls.
When you need to find past rainfall totals or reset features on the...
When you need to find past rainfall totals or reset features on the La Crosse digital gauge, the interface feels more complicated than it needs to be.

Though the La Crosse digital gauge has a sturdier, more protected sensor, its monitor is less user-friendly. Each button has multiple uses; it takes time to sort out how to scroll through your rainfall history.

Of the manual gauges, the La Crosse and AcuRite Easy Read gauges are the simplest. Just push them into the ground away from obstructions and pick them back up to read the results. The La Crosse is especially simple since its measurements are in one-tenth inch increments. The AcuRite makes for more complicated math with increments of one-eighth inch.

you can either jab the la crosse and acurite easy read gauges into...
You can either jab the La Crosse and AcuRite Easy Read gauges into the ground or hang them on two screws.
Credit: Clark Tate

The EZ Read Jumbo is also incredibly straightforward. All you need is a screwdriver to mount the bracket. Reading the two-inch tall numbers is a breeze. The Stratus Precision and Outback Blue gauges take a few more steps and a bit of precision but are far from difficult to use. The sturdy brackets just require a screwdriver and perhaps a level to install. When you measure totals over an inch, you will need to pour water from the larger cylinders into the smaller ones using the included funnels, but we rather enjoy the ritual.

the ezread is just that, though the wide spacing doesn&#039;t give you...
The EZRead is just that, though the wide spacing doesn't give you much detail.
Credit: Clark Tate

The OutdoorHome option has a small, easy-to-mount plate, which slides off quickly for a reading. Unfortunately, the colorless numbers and odd increment fractions (one-sixteenth of an inch) make it awkward to read. The metric measurements on the left-hand side are convenient. The La Crosse Waterfall takes two hands to dump, and the red float washes out with the water.

just pull out a small plastic plug at the bottom of the ezread and...
Just pull out a small plastic plug at the bottom of the EZRead and remove it from its bracket to dump it out.
Credit: Clark Tate

Measuring Capacity


You'll need more capacity if you can't access your gauge reliably after every rainfall event. The digital options excel here since they dump water as they go. Of course, most monitors must be within 100 feet of the sensor, so they don't work well for remote data collection. You can mount the La Crosse sensor up to 300 feet from its monitor.


For truly remote locations, you'll probably want the Stratus or Outback Blue, which both hold 11 inches at a time. After that, capacity drops off considerably. The OutdoorHome measures 6 inches. The EZ Jumbo, La Crosse Waterfall, AcuRite Easy Read, and La Crosse hold 5 inches.

self-emptying digital gauges, like the acurite options, have...
Self-emptying digital gauges, like the AcuRite options, have endlessly capacity.
Credit: Clark Tate

Debris and Durability


A trusted tool that lasts for years is one of life's most satisfying purchases. A good rain gauge should be no different. The digital AcuRite options seem well made and come with calibration instructions so you can keep it running smoothly for years. You do need to be careful with the tabs that attach the housing to the base, though. They seem delicate. Bugs also easily infiltrate the housing and like to take shelter there, which can impact accuracy.


The La Crosse digital gauge has a very sturdy sensor that keeps bugs out. And its connection points seem much sturdier than the two AcuRite options. We aren't as confident in the Ecowitt, mostly because the first unit we tried malfunctioned. It also has a few more parts to it, making it a more complex device.

the ezread gauge does a great job of keeping debris out by adding a...
The EZRead gauge does a great job of keeping debris out by adding a strainer to the entrance funnel.
Credit: Clark Tate

We think the manual gauges will likely outlast the digital versions. The Stratus and OutdoorHome gauges are made of particularly sturdy plastic. Both rely on raised plastic bars to serve as measurement markers, which are likely to last despite heavy UV exposure.

the outdoorhome gauge is made of thick hardy plastic with raised...
The OutdoorHome gauge is made of thick hardy plastic with raised numbers that will not fade under UV rays.
Credit: Clark Tate

The Outback Blue, Waterfall, and the two Easy Read options from AcuRite and La Crosse are made of mid-thickness plastic. Still, they all seem ready to last years. The EZRead Jumbo is made of what seems like the thinnest plastic in the test, with painted-on numbers that could fade under the sun. Our lead tester had one for years in childhood. The letters eventually faded, and the funnel cracked.

Freezing Weather: Don't forget to bring your gauge inside if water may freeze inside, which could crack and ruin any of these models.

it&#039;s not a bad idea to buy two gauges to double-check your accuracy.
It's not a bad idea to buy two gauges to double-check your accuracy.
Credit: Clark Tate

Conclusion


We hope this review helps you understand how rain gauges work and which model best suits your needs. We wish you beautiful weather, even when it comes in the form of a solid downpour.

Clark Tate


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