The world's most in-depth and scientific reviews of tech gear

The Best Sewing Machines of 2019

Thursday October 17, 2019
  • Share this article:
Our Editors independently research, test, and rate the best products. We only make money if you purchase a product through our links, and we never accept free products from manufacturers. Learn more

We researched close to 150 different sewing machines, then bought the top 13 models currently available to compare side-by-side and see which machine is the stitcher supreme. We ran tons and tons of different fabrics through these machines, having a panel of judges — including some expert seamstresses — rate and score the quality of the stitches produced. In addition to looking at the stitch quality of each machine, we also rated and compared the ease of use and ease of set up of each product, looking at everything from threading the needle to winding the bobbin. Check out our complete review below to see which model is truly a superior sewing machine, which mechanical model or computerized crafter scored the best, and which is the best for the budget-conscious beginner.


Top 13 Product Ratings

Displaying 1 - 5 of 13
≪ Previous | Compare | Next ≫
 
Awards Editors' Choice Award Best Buy Award Best Buy Award   
Price $300 List
$299.00 at Amazon
$200 List
$172.76 at Amazon
$220 List
$175.00 at Amazon
$190 List
$149.00 at Amazon
$650 List
$349.00 at Amazon
Star Rating
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Pros Large library of stitches, tied for best sewing performanceGreat sewing performance, easy to useGreat value, excellent buttonholes, easy to useEconomical, easy to useEasy to use, alright sewing skills
Cons Intimidating for new users, can be expensive if not on saleA bit harder to set upStitches are slightly inferior to the top models, built-in light could be betterAverage sewing performanceCan be expensive, subpar buttonholes
Bottom Line The best of the best, but it might be too much machine for those just starting outA fantastic machine for the price and a good bet for the serious userIf you want a solid budget model for starting out or a super easy to use model, then this is your best betA great machine for a beginner, but a more advanced user may require better sewing performanceThis is a machine to look at if it deeply discounted from its list price
Overall Score Sort Icon
100
0
70
100
0
69
100
0
69
100
0
62
100
0
61
Rating Categories Singer 9960... Singer 7258 Stylist Brother XR9550PRW Brother CS6000i Janome 8077
Sewing (40%)
10
0
7
10
0
7
10
0
6
10
0
5
10
0
6
Ease Of Use (30%)
10
0
8
10
0
7
10
0
8
10
0
8
10
0
7
Ease Of Set Up (20%)
10
0
6
10
0
6
10
0
7
10
0
6
10
0
6
Buttonholes (10%)
10
0
6
10
0
8
10
0
7
10
0
6
10
0
4
Specs Singer 9960... Singer 7258 Stylist Brother XR9550PRW Brother CS6000i Janome 8077
Sewing Speed 850 750 800 850 820
Built in Stitches 600 100 110 60 30
Buttonhole Styles 13 7 8 7 6
Buttonhole Sewing (how many steps) 1-Step 1-Step 1-Step 1-Step 1-Step
Maximum Stitch Width 7mm 6.5mm 7mm 7mm 7mm
Maximum Stitch Length 5mm 4.8mm 5mm 5mm 5mm
Thread Cutter Automatic/Built-in Built-in Built-in Built-in Built-in
Automatic Bobbin Winder Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Twin Needle Capability Yes Yes Yes Yes No
Weight 19.7 lbs. 14.8 lbs. 10.3 lbs. 9.4 lbs. 16.6 lbs.

Best Performance Machine


Singer 9960 Quantum Stylist


The 9960 has an enormous library of built-in stitches to choose from.
Editors' Choice Award
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5

$299.00
at Amazon
See It

70
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Sewing 7
  • Ease Of Use 8
  • Ease Of Set-Up 6
  • Buttonholes 6
# of Stitches: 600 | # of Buttonhole Styles: 13
Great stitch quality
Tons of stitches
Easy to use
Pricey

Earning the highest score of the entire group, the Singer 9960 easily claims the title of Best Sewing Machine Overall and the Editors' Choice award. This product has the largest library of preset stitches out of any machine that we have tested, totaling over 600! This machine is jam-packed with features and functions, making it a perfect product for an expert or advanced user. However, it is also relatively simple and easy to use for even the most inexperienced sewers. The 9960 produces stitches that are of superb quality and above-average buttonholes with ease.

Unfortunately, all of this performance comes at a premium price. While it is easy enough for beginners to use, all of the additional features can be a bit daunting to keep track of. This makes the 9960 much more suitable for someone who frequently sews and is very dedicated to the craft. Occasional users looking to undertake small projects or the occasional patch would be much better served by some of the other machines below, which retail for considerably less.

Read full review: Singer 9960

Best Bang for the Buck


Singer 7258 Stylist


Singer 7258
Best Buy Award
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5

$172.76
(14% off)
at Amazon
See It

69
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Sewing 7
  • Ease Of Use 7
  • Ease Of Set-Up 6
  • Buttonholes 8
# of Stitches: 100 | # of Buttonhole Styles: 7
Awesome sewing performance
No hassle at all
Great value
A little more effort to set up

Just narrowly edged out of the top spot, the Singer 7258 is a phenomenal sewing machine, essentially matching the performance of the 9960 and costing a fraction of the price. This product is an amazing value, earning it our Best Buy award. It is the clear choice when shopping on a budget. The 7258 created buttonholes of unmatched quality and matched the stitching quality of the 9960.

This model is a little more difficult to use than the 9960. The labeling and instructions on the 7258 aren't quite as intuitive and the built-in work light is mediocre at best. However, these are relatively small flaws and are easily overshadowed by this machine's solid performance and incredible value. If you are shopping on a budget, you can't go wrong with the 7258. This machine is also an excellent choice for a first sewing machine.

Read full review: Singer 7258

Best for Beginners


Brother XR9550PRW


Best Buy Award
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5

$175.00
(20% off)
at Amazon
See It

69
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Sewing 6
  • Ease Of Use 8
  • Ease Of Set-Up 7
  • Buttonholes 7
# of Stitches: 110 | # of Buttonhole Styles: 8
Extremely easy to operate
High-quality buttonholes
Excellent value option
Above average, rather than amazing stitch quality

If you are just getting started with sewing or are looking for a machine that is supremely easy to use, then the XR9550PRW is an excellent choice. This machine is one of the easiest to use and set up that we have seen and has a respectable library of stitches that should cover most projects. It produces buttonholes that have excellent stitch quality with a very intuitive 1-step process, has an automatic bobbin winder, and a built-in thread cutter that makes it very easy for a beginner to get up and running with their first sewing projects without major frustration or for veteran users to quickly and efficiently accomplish their desired task.

While the stitch quality on this machine is quite high, it is still outmatched by the Singer 7258 and the Singer 9960. This is something to consider if you need perfect stitches — and are willing to deal with a more complex, expensive machine. However, the stitches produced by the XR9550PRW are usually sufficient for most projects and you should consider this model if you are shopping on a budget and want a hassle-free machine.

Read full review: Brother XR9550PRW

Best for a Tight Budget


Brother Project Runway CS5055PRW


The Brother Project Runway CS5055PRW.

$125.00
at Amazon
See It

# of Stitches: 50 | # of Buttonhole Styles: 5
Economical
Easy to use
Smaller stitch library

The Brother Project Runway CS5055PRW is essentially an identical machine to our Best Buy award winner, the Brother XR9550PRW in terms of specifications, with one exception. The CS5055PRW has a reduced set of available stitches — about half the number of the XR9550PRW but retails for a decent amount less. This makes it a great option for someone who only needs the basic stitches for their projects, or for someone who is shopping on a bit of a threadbare budget.


Some of the machines ready for testing!
Some of the machines ready for testing!

Why You Should Trust Us?


We purchased all of the sewing machines in the review here at TechGearLab and won't ever accept any free units from manufacturers — we buy everything just the same as you would. We have been reviewing and testing these products for close to three years now, creating thousands and thousands of stitches along the way. Our in-house tester,Austin Palmer , has been extensively testing sewing machines the past few years and has logged tons and tons of hours doing everything from scallop stitches to machine embroidery.

He is joined by Sarah Werick, who has had a lifelong passion for sewing. She originally learned how to sew at age 12 from her mom and grandmother. She took sewing and home economics class in high school which allowed her to earn money tailoring clothes upon graduation. She later took another advanced sewing class in college. Her extensive experience using and troubleshooting different machine issues throughout the years has also given her a wealth of understanding

about sewing machines, sergers, and embroidery machines. Sewing has become an art medium for her and she now prefers to create original pieces from her designs rather than using patterns or mending existing items.

In our quest to find the best, we enlisted the help of both expert sewing machine users and complete novices to try out each product and get a better feel of how easy they are to operate and set up for beginners and experts. We then made thousands and thousands of different stitches on tons of different fabric types, rating and judging their quality — both in appearance and consistency. Then, we used each machine's buttonhole specific presser foot to make a series of buttonholes and compare both the process of creating a buttonhole and the quality of the finished stitches.

Related: How We Tested Sewing Machines


Analysis and Test Results


To determine the overall score and our award winners, we divided up our testing process into four weighted rating metrics: Sewing, Ease of Use, Ease of Setup and Buttonholes. Each of these metrics is weighted based on its significance to these products.

Related: Buying Advice for Sewing Machines

Value


Two machines stand out as being exceptionally great values and great choices when shopping on a limited budget: the Singer 7258 and the Brother XR9550PRW. While the 7258 has a list price that is a bit more than the XR9550PRW, these machines usually retail for about the same price. The 7258 produces slightly better stitches, making it more suitable for a frequent user, while the XR9550PRW is much easier to use, making it better for beginners or occasional users. The Singer 9960 is the overall best of the best, but usually retails for a bit more than either of our Best Buy Award winners.

Some of our sewing test swatches to compare the stitches produced bv each machine side by side.
Some of our sewing test swatches to compare the stitches produced bv each machine side by side.

Sewing


First and foremost, we rated and compared the sewing performance and stitch quality of each sewing machine. This is the most significant of all of our testing metrics, accounting for 40% of each machine's final score. We tested out a variety of different stitches on a wide spectrum of different fabrics then judged the results. We looked for visually appealing and consistent stitches, with proper tension to keep the fabric from bunching. We used the manufacturer's recommended settings for each type of fabric and stitch.


We used a long straight stitch, a zigzag stitch, a scallop stitch, as well as using the zipper presser foot to sew on a zipper. These stitches offered the most variety and consistent trends in scores, as well as being some of the most commonly used when sewing, making them a good basis for comparison.

Here you can see the 4 stitches that made up most of our sewing: long straight  zigzag  scallop  and buttonholes.
Here you can see the 4 stitches that made up most of our sewing: long straight, zigzag, scallop, and buttonholes.

Differences between each machine were much easier to discern with the maximum straight stitch length, as any flaws were magnified and much more evident. For example, the 9960 did well with this stitch on cotton, but other machines, like the Brother CS6000i, were prone to bunching up the fabric due to uneven stitch tension.

Each machine has a specific presser foot for attaching a zipper, though some were better than others. Some machines did very well, with its presser foot clearing all parts of the zipper and cleanly attaching it. Others collided with parts of the zipper, causing the stitches to become uneven and tangled on top of each other.

We tested the zipper presser foot with each machine.
We tested the zipper presser foot with each machine.

Tying for the top spot, both the 9960 and the 7258 earned a 7 out of 10. These machines both did well with the long straight stitches, with the 9960 having a slight edge. However, the 7258 is far superior to the 9960 at producing a zigzag stitch — the best of the entire group.

Stitch number 9  produced by the 7258 came out exceptionally well.
Stitch number 9, produced by the 7258 came out exceptionally well.

We found that we were able to create a comparable zigzag stitch with the 9960 by experimenting and tweaking the settings, but we scored based on the default instructions. However, the 9960 did an amazing job in our scallop stitch test, tying for the top score with the Janome 8077. It even did an excellent job on the more difficult to sew fabrics, such as polyester charmeuse or silk.

One of our scallop stitch test swatches. Stitch number 10 was made on the 9960.
One of our scallop stitch test swatches. Stitch number 10 was made on the 9960.

Both the 7258 and the 9960 did a great job at attaching a zipper with their respective specialized presser feet.

Following this duo of top-notch machines, the Brother XR9550PRW and the Janome 8077 both earned a 6 out of 10 for their solid showing in our stitch quality assessments. We tasked each machine with a long straight stitch on our set of testing fabric. These three machines all did quite well, creating passable stitches on almost every fabric — even though they did noticeably struggle a bit more with the difficult ones than the top models. For example, the 8077 and the XR9550PRW found the charmeuse to be a bit trying.

The scores began to diverge much more when we moved on to the zigzag and scallop stitches. The XR9550PRW tended to have a bit more tension in the bottom thread than we would have liked, inhibiting the stretch of this stitch — particularly noticeable on the jersey knit woven cotton.

This product produced a very nice zigzag stitch.
This product produced a very nice zigzag stitch.

The 8077 trailed slightly behind, tending to bunch up the fabric in an undesirable way when sewing on corduroy, satin, or charmeuse.

However, the tables turned in the scallop stitch assessments, with the 8077 tying for the top score of the entire group, as mentioned above. The Janome delivered a stellar scallop stitch on every single type of test fabric we use. The XR9550PRW trailed right behind the 8077, mainly held back by the lackluster zigzag stitch that it produced on polyester chiffon.

The XR9550PRW and the 8077 finished out our stitch quality metric with a solid performance in our zipper test. We used the zipper-specific presser foot for each of these machines to sew a zipper on to a test swatch of fabric and both the machines did admirably.

Next, the Brother CS6000i, the Singer Simple 3232, the Singer 4452, and the Janome Magnolia 7318 all merited a 5 out of 10 for their middle-of-the-road performance. The CS6000i delivered a disappointing long straight stitch and did a relatively sloppy job at attaching the zipper, but was redeemed by a strong showing in our zigzag and scallop assessments. The Magnolia and the 4452 delivered average performances in the straight stitch, zigzag, and zipper challenges, but both scored below average when using a scallop stitch — the Magnolia more so than the 4452. The Simple 3232 did about the same as the Magnolia and the 4452 at the long straight stitch across the different fabric types and also struggled a bit with the scallop stitch, but it did do better than the other two at the zigzag stitch and at attaching the zipper.

Next, the Singer 4423 Heavy Duty, Brother HC1850, the Spiegel SP 3201, and the Brother ST371HD all earned a 4 out of 10. The 4452 lagged slightly behind on long, straight stitches, and noticeably struggled with scallop stitches — earning the lowest score of the bunch. The HC1850 did a decent job on the easier fabrics, but faltered on the more difficult to sew ones, bunching up and becoming uneven. The ST371HD and the Spiegel delivered a lackluster performance across the board, although the ST371HD did surprisingly well with the woven cotton — one of the harder fabrics to sew.

Last, the Brother XM2701 earned a 3 out of 10 for its disappointing performance in our stitch tests. This machine did manage to complete all of the tests without too many issues, but the stitches simply looked bad. The long straight stitch only looked good on charmeuse and satin. The stitching on the other fabrics being very uneven between the top and bottom threads, causing it to bunch up. The zigzag stitch had similar issues, with most of the different types of fabric ending up wrinkled.

The XM2701 was very prone to wrinkling the fabric in our experience.
The XM2701 was very prone to wrinkling the fabric in our experience.

The scallop stitch was by far the most disappointing for this machine, with the scallops coming out in varying sizes and shapes.

The lighting on this machine was exceptional.
The lighting on this machine was exceptional.

Ease of Use


Next, we rated and compared how convenient and easy to operate each sewing machine is, which accounts for 30% of their final score. We judged the quality and clarity of the printed labels on each machine and the ease of selecting different stitches. We also looked at how clear and intuitive it is to change the stitch settings. Finally, we compared other convenience features like automatic or push-button sewing, how the needle threading mechanism and the thread cutter worked, needle stop position settings, and the quality of the integrated work light.


While some of our comments about the performance of each machine in this metric get into some fairly fine differences, we did find that they actually made quite a significant difference in terms of overall convenience and ease of use. This can be especially true for users that might not have the most dexterity or the best visual acuity and make the difference between being able to use one of these machines to effectively complete your sewing projects or giving up in frustration.

Tying for the top score, the Brother HC1850, CS6000i, XR9550PRW, and the Singer 9960 all distinguished themselves by being some of the easiest to use sewing machines that we have seen to date, each earning an 8 out of 10. A key factor that sets these four products apart from the rest is the intuitive and very easy to understand set of labels and directions that are printed right on the machines themselves, though the 9960 had slightly less clear directions than the rest of the group.

The XR9550PRW has exceptionally clear instructions printed on the machine.
The XR9550PRW has exceptionally clear instructions printed on the machine.

This is an important aspect for all users, even the more experienced ones. Every machine threads similarly, but there are slight differences that vary from machine to machine and it's easy to forget the minutiae that accompany threading them or winding the bobbin.

Every machine that we looked at has a built-in work light, with some being substantially brighter than others. The 9960 has the best work light of the entire group by far, followed by the Brother HC1850. The CS6000i and the XR9550PRW both were mediocre in the light department and definitely would require the use of supplemental lighting.

All four of these machines have automatic sewing capabilities and have the needle set to always stop in the down position — unfortunately, this isn't adjustable. When it came to using the thread cutters, the 9960 is the easiest with its fully automatic one, activated by a simple button press.

We really liked the automatic thread cutting feature on this model.
We really liked the automatic thread cutting feature on this model.

The remainder of this group all has a manual thread cutter on the side. It is also extremely easy to select between different stitches on the CS6000i, XR9550PRW, and the HC1850, but it is a little more difficult on the 9960.

Following this top group, the Janome 8077 and the Singer 7258 both earned a 7 out of 10 for their ease of use. Both of these machines weren't as well labeled as the top quartet in this metric, with the 8077 and the 7258 scoring a little worse.

This machine did not have the most thorough directions printed on it.
This machine did not have the most thorough directions printed on it.

The Janome has a solid built-in work light, while supplemental lighted is necessary when using the 7258. It is very easy to swap stitches on the 7258 and the 8077.

We enjoyed the LCD touch screen on this model.
We enjoyed the LCD touch screen on this model.

This duo has automatic sewing and the 7258 and the 8077 both have the bonus of having an adjustable needle stop position, meaning you can configure it to always stop in either the down position or the up position to match your preference.

Next, the Singer 4452 and the Singer 4423 both earned a 6 out of 10. This pair of heavy-duty sewing machines both performed identically, having a great set of printed instructions on the machine, a decent work light, and an average stitch selection method.

The stitch selection dials on the 4452 by Singer.
The stitch selection dials on the 4452 by Singer.

Neither of these machines can sew automatically and the needle stop position isn't regulated, meaning it will stop wherever it is when you remove your foot from the pedal. This pair of machines both have a manual thread cutter.

Next, the Brother ST371HD, the Singer Simple 3232, the Janome Magnolia, and the Brother XM2701 each earned a 5 out of 10 for their mediocre ease of use. The Magnolia has a surprisingly good work light, but a relatively poor set of instructions on the machine.

The Magnolia had one of the brightest and most illuminating built-in lights out of all the machines we tested.
The Magnolia had one of the brightest and most illuminating built-in lights out of all the machines we tested.

It also isn't terribly easy to select different stitches and lacks automatic sewing or dedicated needle stop abilities. However, it does have a thread cutter that is fairly easy to use.

The ST371HD has a solid set of on-machine instructions, but a mediocre work light and a more difficult to use stitch selection method compared to the other machines in the group. It also lacks automatic sewing and a dedicated needle stop position — expected, as it is a mechanical sewing machine. Its thread cutter is also a little more difficult to use than some of the competition. The Simple 3232 scored almost identically to the ST371HD, but we preferred the light on the 3232 a bit more, as it doesn't cast a shadow on your work.

We found the integrated work light on the Brother XM2701 to be even better than the Simple 3232, providing even more illumination and no inconvenient shadows whatsoever. Unfortunately, that is the only thing that impressed us when it came to ease of use for this sewing machine. The thread cutter is fine but this machine is not capable of automatic or push-button sewing. The needle stops wherever it is when you let off the pedal. It has a decent amount of printed instructions on the screen but we did have to look up how to do a few things in the manual, namely the stitch selection process.

The stitch selection wheel can be a bit confusing at first.
The stitch selection wheel can be a bit confusing at first.

Finishing at the back of the group, the Spiegel earned a 4 out of 10 for being one of the hardest to use sewing machines of the group. While we did like the built-in light and the labels on the machine and the needle threader are fine, we were not fans of the stitch selection method, finding it to be quite unintuitive and the hardest to use of the entire group.

Some models had molded instructions that were difficult to see.
Some models had molded instructions that were difficult to see.

Ease of Setup


In this metric, we rated and compared the amount of effort it takes to get the machine set up each time you want to use it. Specifically, we looked at how hard it is to thread the machine and install the bobbin, as well as installing the various presser feet. We also graded the bobbin winding features of each machine and the quality of the wound bobbin.


The Brother XR9550PRW, the Spiegel, and the Brother XM2701 all tied for the top spot in this set of tests, each earning a 7 out of 10. The XR9550PRW has tons of very clear and easy to understand directions printed on the outside of the machine. It has the typical semi-automatic needle threader and makes it easy to wind bobbins. Even better, the bobbins it winds are very consistent and uniformly wound.

The Spiegel is one of the easiest machines to thread and has one of the best, non-automatic needle threaders that we have seen in the course of our testing process. It also is very easy to install the bobbin but didn't wind the bobbin as consistently as the XR9550PRW.

The SP 3201 has easy to read bobbin directions.
The SP 3201 has easy to read bobbin directions.

The Brother XM2701 is almost identical to the Brother XR9550PRW when it comes to threading the machine but has an even better needle threader that makes it very easy to get the thread through the needle's eye without a lot of fuss. The bobbin setup process is also a breeze — both for installing and winding one — and it also winds very consistent and uniform bobbins.

The stitches came out a little uneven on the XM2701.
The stitches came out a little uneven on the XM2701.

Following the top performers, the rest of the machines all clustered in the middle, with the CS6000i, Janome 8077, Singer 4423, Singer 7258, Singer 9960, and the Brother HC1850 all received a 6 out of 10. These models are all about the same difficulty to thread the upper portion of the machine, with the 7258 and the 8077 being slightly more difficult than the others. It was noticeably easier to install the bobbin on the CS6000i and the HC1850 than the rest, though it still wasn't too difficult on the other machines.

This model has a sticker with instructions on how to thread the bobbin.
This model has a sticker with instructions on how to thread the bobbin.

None of these have a fully-automatic needle threader, all having the standard style needle threader. However, there were varying degrees of difficulty in operating it depending on the machine, with the 9960 being much easier to use than the others.

When it came to winding a bobbin, the 4423 and the 8077 are the easiest to thread and wound the most uniform bobbins. The 7258 is a little more involved to a thread, but wound equally high-quality bobbins. The CS6000i and the HC1850 are easy to wind, but both wound a bit unevenly. The 9960 scored the worst of this group, being difficult to thread with directions that are very hard to see. On top of that, the bobbin wound was quite inconsistent.

Next, the Brother ST371HD, Singer 4452, and the Janome Magnolia earned a 5, 5, and a 4 respectively.

The ST371HD has a needle threader that is very easy to use and is about average in difficulty to thread the machine and wind the bobbin. However, it is a little more difficult to install the bobbin than we would have liked.

The notch that you have to route the thread through makes it a little more difficult to install the bobbin on the ST371HD than some of the other machines.
The notch that you have to route the thread through makes it a little more difficult to install the bobbin on the ST371HD than some of the other machines.

The Singer 4452 is about average across the board, though the needle threader did give us some slight issues. The Magnolia needs to be manually threaded, increasing the difficulty, and is about average to thread. However, it is reasonably difficult to wind and install the bobbin, with the bobbin continually coming out bottom heavy.

Finishing at the very back of the group, the Singer Simple 3232 earned a 3 out of 10 for its poor performance. While it isn't too bad to thread or wind a bobbin, it is one of the worst when it comes to installing a bobbin and can be quite a hassle.

The presser foot for making buttonholes installed on the 7258.
The presser foot for making buttonholes installed on the 7258.

Buttonholes


Buttons are commonly used in clothing, and anyone interested in making garments will inevitably need to create buttonholes. In addition to garment construction, many other sewing projects will use buttons or buttonholes. Modern sewing machines can easily and quickly create buttonholes, using either a one or four-step process. While each machine we tested successfully produced a buttonhole, there were significant differences between the ease of execution and the quality of the finished product.


Each machine has a presser foot specifically for buttonholes, with marks to align it in the right location, and an adjustable size that will match the button. As expected, it was much easier to execute a 1-step buttonhole compared to the 4-step buttonhole, and we preferred the former method. One of our Best Buy award winners, the Singer 7258 is the easiest to use to make a buttonhole, as well as our top scorer in this entire metric, earning an 8 out of 10. This was the only model that stood out in this test, creating a buttonhole that was not prone to unraveling, in direct contrast to most of the other models.

Some of the buttonholes produced by the 7258 in the second to last column
Some of the buttonholes produced by the 7258 in the second to last column

A final aspect that the 7258 excelled at, that we didn't initially think would be a differentiating factor, was lining up the presser foot so the buttonhole ends up in the desired location. This proved to quite difficult on some machines and could prove catastrophic on some sewing projects. Imagine spending hours and hours making a custom garment with expensive fabric, and having the buttonholes end up crooked and misaligned after all that work — it would be devastating! The 7258 has a very visible set of marks on the presser foot to match to the marks on the fabric.

Next, the XR9550PRW by Brother merited a 7 out of 10 for its stellar performance in our buttonhole tests. The 1-step process is quite easy and intuitive to execute, though our one gripe came from trying to align the buttonhole in a precise location, as it can be a little difficult to line up the marks on the presser foot with the marks on the fabric.

Some of the high-quality buttonholes produced by the XR9550PRW.
Some of the high-quality buttonholes produced by the XR9550PRW.

We liked that this machine seemed to thoroughly reinforce the stitches on the sides, making it one of the most securely made buttonholes of the entire group. The finished stitch looked very clean, though there was a minuscule amount of bunching on the top bar when we used a swatch of charmeuse.

The bulk of the machines came next, with the CS6000i, the Magnolia 7318, the Spiegel, and the 9960 all earning a 6 out of 10. These machines were all about the same difficulty to set up to sew a buttonhole and produced a finished product of comparable quality. It is the ease of aligning the buttonhole that is the key differentiating factor between these machines. It is the easiest on the Magnolia and the hardest on the Spiegel, with the remaining products in this group falling in the middle.

The buttonhole presser foot with installed button on the 9960.
The buttonhole presser foot with installed button on the 9960.

The ST371HD, the Janome 8077, the Singer 4423, the Singer Simple 3232, and the Singer 4452 all followed, each receiving a 4 out of 10. It is much harder to see the alignment marks on the buttonhole presser foot on these machines, making it almost impossible to create the buttonhole in the desired location. The quality of the buttonholes produced is also wanting, with these machines tending to create buttonholes that are prone to unraveling.

Finally, the XM2701 again finished at the back of the overall group in our buttonhole metric, meriting a 3 out of 10 for its meager performance. While we will give it the fact that it does make it very easy to get set up to make buttonholes and line up the buttonholes in the correct position, it doesn't do that well at actually sewing buttonholes. The bar tacks are so-so and the sides of the stitch bunched up the fabric and didn't seem to hold that well.

The XM2701 does provide a decent amount of light.
The XM2701 does provide a decent amount of light.

The sides of the stitch are also very close together, which can make it a bit harrowing when you go to cut the slit in the fabric.

Regardless of which sewing machine you pick  we hope that this has helped you find the perfect fit for your needs and budget.
Regardless of which sewing machine you pick, we hope that this has helped you find the perfect fit for your needs and budget.

Conclusion


At this point, we would hope that you have a fairly good idea of which sewing machine will be the best match for your needs and budget. All of these products are capable of sewing fabric together but there is a marked difference between many of them when it comes to stitching quality and ease of use. Hopefully, this review has been beneficial and will help you accomplish all those sewing projects you have been meaning to do!


Austin Palmer, David Wise, and Jenna Ammerman