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Corsair Scimitar RGB Elite Review

This built to purpose MMO mouse boasts 17 programmable buttons, tons of lighting, and all the customization options one could wish for but it takes some time to master
Corsair Scimitar RGB Elite
Credit: Corsair
Top Pick Award
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Price:   $80 List | $94 at Amazon
Pros:  17 programmable buttons, adjustable side button pad, customizable lighting
Cons:  Heavy, relatively difficult to use, stiff cord
Manufacturer:   Corsair
By Nick Miley and Austin Palmer  ⋅  May 2, 2021
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80
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#7 of 10
  • Performance - 35% 9
  • Customization - 35% 8
  • Ease of Use - 15% 7
  • Buttons - 15% 8

Our Verdict

This mouse is a fearsome piece of hardware on account of the massive button arsenal it brings to bear in MMO and MOBA games. The added keys do require some extra work to master. However, the reward will eclipse the effort as one's carefully composed macros are brought forth like a cascade of hellfire laying low competitors like so many felled leaves in fall. Oh, the unit has great lighting options, too.

Compare to Similar Products

 
Awards Top Pick Award Editors' Choice Award Editors' Choice Award   
Price $80 List$80 List
$67.06 at Amazon
$150 List
$119.99 at Amazon
$80 List$70 List
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Pros 17 programmable buttons, adjustable side button pad, customizable lightingOptical switches, onboard memory, customizable scroll resistanceOnboard memory, symmetrical, optical switchesBraided cable, infinite scroll optionOptical switches, supple cable
Cons Heavy, relatively difficult to use, stiff cordAsymmetrical, grips hard to cleanExpensive, slow “wake-up”Fixed polling rate, too heavy for FPS gamesRelatively limited customization
Bottom Line This purpose-built MMO device sports 17 customizable buttons, full-spectrum lighting, and a host of adjustment options but it takes some patience to bridle this fillyA deadly gaming periphery with state-of-the-art components, easy set-up, and a competitive price pointThis competitive gaming device comes loaded with full battle rattle and is tether-free for an increased striking distance though that freedom comes at a hefty priceAn above-average performing mouse featuring customizable weightA high-quality mouse with a price most can manage
Rating Categories Corsair Scimitar... Razer Basilisk V2 Razer Viper Ultimate Logitech G502 HERO Razer DeathAdder V2
Performance (35%)
9
9
10
9
9
Customization (35%)
8
8
8
8
7
Ease Of Use (15%)
7
10
10
9
9
Buttons (15%)
8
10
8
9
9
Specs Corsair Scimitar... Razer Basilisk V2 Razer Viper Ultimate Logitech G502 HERO Razer DeathAdder V2
Sensor/ Type/ Flawless? PMW 3391/ Optical/ Yes Focus+/ Optical/ Yes Focus+/ Optical/ Yes Hero 16K/ Optical/ Yes Focus+/ Optical/ Yes
Number of Buttons 17 10 (+1 on bottom) 7 (+1 on bottom) 11 7
Wire/Charging Cable (feet, inches) 6' 7' 6' 6'6" 7'
Weight (grams) 119g 91g 77g 119 - 137g 80g
Polling Rate (Hz) 125, 250, 500, 1000 125, 500, 1000 1000 1000 125, 500, 1000
Software Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
RGB Lighting Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
DPI/CPI (in steps of) 100 - 18000 (1) 100 - 20000 (50) 100 - 20000 (50) 100 - 25600 (50) 100 - 20000 (50)
Tracking Speed (IPS/FPS) 400 650 650 400+ 650
On-Board Memory (# of profiles)? Yes (3) Yes (5) Yes (5) Yes (5) Yes (5)
Switch Type (Manufacturer) Machanical (Omron) Optical (Razor) Optical (Razor) Mechanical (Logitech) Optical (Razor)
Handedness Right Right Both Right Right
Size Large Large Medium Large Large
Length 4.7" 5.1" 5" 5.11" 5"
Shell length 5.6" 6" 5.75" 6" 5.8"
Height (max) 1.62" 1.68" 1.5" 1.63" 1.68"
Hump inset 2" 2.1" 2.5" 2.43" 2.5"
Finger Width 2.16" 2.36" 2.5" 2.2" 2.73"
Waist 2.87" 2.4" 2.21" 2.25" 2.22"
Palm Width 2.35" 2.26" 2.57" 2.21" 2.55"

Our Analysis and Test Results

In a competitive class of gaming mice, the Corsair Scimitar RGB Elite stands out for its sheer number of programmable buttons and customization options. The supportive iCUE software is quite sophisticated and allows one to remap all 17 buttons, build complex macros, layer effects on the 4 light zones as well as build and save multiple profiles for various gaming activities. When you add all the features up, this mouse is designed for elite-level play but is not for the casual user if you want to bring out its full potential.

Performance Comparison


17 buttons! Now that firepower right at your fingertips.
17 buttons! Now that firepower right at your fingertips.
Credit: Jason Peters

Performance


Gaming hardware is all about performance. Well, customization, too. But we'll get to that below. What do we mean by performance? This is an assessment primarily of the sensor tracking the mouse's movements which we rate with specs like DPI/CPI, polling rate, and tracking speed. However, we also look at the button switches as well as the weight of the mouse (sans cord) and the feet that allow the mouse to move smoothly across the pad. While the Corsair Scimitar RGB Elite made a great showing in this assessment, we should acknowledge that all the mice in the class did as well. Essentially, high performance is what sets a gaming mouse apart from other mice.

The Corsair has top-shelf hardware including a flawless optical...
The Corsair has top-shelf hardware including a flawless optical sensor and mechanical switches.
Credit: Jason Peters

Okay, generalities aside. Let's get down to the naked facts. The Corsair Scimitar RGB Elite sports a PMW 3391 sensor that can be set to function flawlessly (meaning no corrective firmware such as angle snapping). The sensor has a polling rate that maxes out at 1,000 Hz, and a tracking speed that is fixed at 400 inches per second. Really though, 400 inches per second? Who can move that fast? Okay, here's the interesting part, the Scimitar has an adjustable DPI/CPI that goes from 100 to 18,000 in steps of 1. If you're playing with this level of nuance and sophistication then our hats are off to you.

This mouse is on the larger and heavier side of the spectrum but...
This mouse is on the larger and heavier side of the spectrum but that's the price you pay for heavy-weight striking power.
Credit: Jason Peters

Moving on. The Corsair Scimitar RGB Elite uses the much lauded Omron switches for the left and right buttons. It also has four feet — one in each corner — that offer a stable, even glide. Finally, the unit is quite heavy at 119 grams. This makes it a poor candidate for FPS games as aim and quick wrist flick are difficult. When you add it all up, this behemoth packs a heavyweight punch but surfers some where speed is concerned.

Customization


Customization, it's as important to the gamer as performance. One without the other and you don't have much of a gaming mouse. Our analysis of mouse adjustability primarily focuses on button remapping and macros and, to a lesser degree, lighting, weight, handedness, and scroll wheel resistance. The Corsair Scimitar RGB Elite is highly customizable, only lacking adjustments in non-critical areas.


It's hard to imagine a mouse with more buttons to program. Seriously, there are so many buttons on the side (12 in total) that the thumb pad itself is adjustable to mitigate the issue of being able to reach them all. There are also 4 light zones (front, scroll wheel, thumb side, and shell top logo) all of which can be programmed in the RGB spectrum with game-specific effect and layering options. Unfortunately, this mouse only works for right-handed folks and it lacks adjustment to the scroll wheel's rolling resistance and the overall weight. Yet, given all the other options, it's almost a relief to not have to worry about these last two features.

The side button panel adjusts fore and aft to put it in the best...
The side button panel adjusts fore and aft to put it in the best position possible.
Credit: Jason Peters

Ease of Use


We all like when things go easy. As such, we assessed the Corsair Scimitar RGB Elite for the effort required to learn and operate its software, the ability to easily make on-the-fly button assignments, and how the cable affects mouse gestures, and how one sets up their gaming rig. While the Scimitar isn't as hard to program as, say, a universal remote (man, those things are a pain), it does require more engagement than most other models in the class.


We do not want to paint the Corsair Scimitar RGB Elite as an especially difficult mouse to set up. In essence, it has the same basic software, on-the-fly adjustments, and cord as all the other mice in the class. What sets it apart in this evaluation is the depth at which this unit functions. With 17 buttons that can be remapped and highly detailed software to allow the user to be as creative as they want to be, the whole operation requires more effort to learn and use. Moreover, the unit has a relatively short cord at just 6 feet. This may cause some to have to rethink the location of their tower. All in all, this is one of the more difficult mice in the class to use but for good reasons.

The depth of the iCUE software necessarily means that it will take a...
The depth of the iCUE software necessarily means that it will take a bit more effort to master.
Credit: Austin Palmer

Buttons


This metric looks at, you guessed it, the buttons on the mouse. Specifically, we look at the actuation of the left and right buttons, the scroll wheel resistance, the scroll wheel clicking switch, and the noise produced by the operation of these components. Overall, the Corsair Scimitar RGB Elite came in slightly below average in the evaluation primarily due to its relatively high scroll wheel resistance and stiff clicking switch.

While we had no complaints about the buttons, we found the scroll...
While we had no complaints about the buttons, we found the scroll wheel to be too stuff.
Credit: Jason Peters

So, what do we mean by high resistance and stiff clicking? Let's first start with our evaluation of the scroll wheel. Having tested many of these devices, we have found that there is a happy medium between an infinite scroll (no resistance at all) and a scroll wheel that tires out one's finger and the Scimitar falls on the latter side of the line. Moreover, the scroll click switch is a little hard to depress. These two characteristics are particularly noticeable (and annoying) when performing non-gaming tasks like working in a spreadsheet or surfing the web. Aside from that, the right and left buttons actuate Omron mechanical switches that have a nice action and produce very little noise. Likewise, the scroll wheel is nearly silent.

Value


The Corsair Scimitar RGB Elite is on the high end of what one can expect to pay for a corded gaming mouse. However, it offers substantial benefits for serious MMO and MOBA players. As such, we find the unit well worth the money if you are regularly engaging in games where hardware of this kind offers a competitive edge. However, if you fall outside of this niche, this mouse is overkill and thus not worth the extra dough.

Conclusion


This hands-on review of the Corsair Scimitar RGB Elite covers all the key aspects of high-performance gaming mice. Specifically, we look at the hardware such as button switches and sensors and how these components compare to one another. We also look at customization options (lighting effects, button remapping, etc.) and the ease of operation from set-up to in-game adjustments. Finally, we assess details of the interface such as button action, noise, and scroll wheel resistance. All told, this article provides the information needed to quickly decide if this is the right mouse for your gaming needs.

Nick Miley and Austin Palmer