Reviews You Can Rely On

How We Tested Handheld Vacuums

Tuesday October 5, 2021
Testing the maximum reach of each product.
Testing the maximum reach of each product.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

How do we test handheld vacuums? First, we did tons of research, combing through existing reviews, user experiences, and manufacturer's marketing claims to find the portable products that showed the most potential. Then, we bought them all to test head-to-head. We evaluated and scored each product on its cleaning performance, looking at everything from easy to clean messes, like dust and dirt, to much harder ones, like pet hair or flour smooshed into carpet. We also compared how easy each one is to use, looking at how well it can clean in difficult areas, how convenient it is to operate, and its battery life. We divided up all of our tests into six weighted metrics, with our full testing plans and procedures discussed below.

The Wandvac picks up dirt just fine.
The Wandvac picks up dirt just fine.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

Dust & Dirt


For our first set of tests, we compared and scored how well each vacuum did at cleaning up some of the most commonly encountered messes around your home, as well as how well the brushes fit into corners and cracks. We used the bristle brush for each of these tests, or the upholstery attachment if the vacuum didn't have a bristle brush, but did not use any motorized attachments. Altogether, these four tests accounted for 20% of the final score for each product.

Starting off, we looked at how each cordless handheld vacuum did at dusting. However, we wanted to make a consistent test for each vacuum, so we substituted sifted flour for dust, as this allowed us to easily control the amount of mess each vacuum was expected to clean up. We took a nylon photo screen, statically charged it by rubbing a pair of wool socks over it, then sprinkled sifted flour over it. We shook off the excess and then timed each vacuum how long it took to clean it satisfactorily.

Sifting flour for our dust testing.
Sifting flour for our dust testing.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

We moved on to assessing how well the brush for each vacuum cleans along small ledges and in corners. We spread out some coffee grounds on the top of a section of baseboard and on a windowsill, then rated how well the bristles fit into the spaces and freed the debris to be vacuumed away. Additionally, we also awarded points based on how well each one cleaned in the corners of the windowsill.

The 'JR02 does a fairly good job at cleaning cramped areas.
The 'JR02 does a fairly good job at cleaning cramped areas.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

Finally, we tried out each vacuum with a slightly harder mess to clean up: dirt and mud. We made a mixture of dirt and mud, then spread it out across a section of linoleum floor and let it dry. After sufficient time had passed, we tried cleaning an area with each vacuum and ranked them on how long it took to clean. Most of these vacuums aren't rated for wet/dry operation, so make sure you check the manufacturer's instructions before cleaning up anything wet or risk damaging your handheld vacuum.

Tough Messes


For our second metric, also responsible for 20% of the total score, we continued to escalate the difficulty of our cleaning challenges. We tested out how well each vacuum did at cleaning up flour and crushed up oats from different surfaces and how effectively each handheld vacuum could pick up larger particles. We also measured the amount of air each product could move using a sealed chamber and an anemometer. For these tests, we picked the most appropriate attachment for the task — whichever one was the perfect balance between cleaning performance and convenience.

We spread out a tablespoon of flour on a section of replacement car carpet, then scored each vacuum on how much it picked up after a single pass and how much it picked up after multiple passes (eight, to be precise).

The Bissell did an admirable job cleaning up flour.
The Bissell did an admirable job cleaning up flour.
Credit: Austin Palmer

In our oatmeal test, we mixed up our testing procedure a bit. We spread out two tablespoons of oats on a couch cushion, then allowed each vacuum 20 seconds to clean it and scored them on how well it did. We took the amount collected, the amount remaining, and the amount flung aside into account when scoring. We then repeated this test on the car carpet, averaging the results.

The Pet Hair Eraser has a motorized brush which makes quick work of...
The Pet Hair Eraser has a motorized brush which makes quick work of oats.
Credit: Austin Palmer

Next, we attempted to suck up a handful of Mini-Wheats cereal with each vacuum, noting if it could actually suck up the squares and if they could make it past the gate into the collection bin.

Can your vacuum pick up larger and heavier items? Consider who...
Can your vacuum pick up larger and heavier items? Consider who you'll be cleaning up after and what kind of messes you want to be able to tackle.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

Finally, we measured the airflow caused by each vacuum using an anemometer mounted in a sealed chamber. We sealed one end of the chamber around each handheld vacuum, then recorded the airspeed on the anemometer and based scores off of that.

Hard-to-Reach Areas


Next, we considered how easy it is to clean cramped areas with each handheld vacuum, also accounting for 20% of the final score. We tested out how well each vacuum cleaned in small cracks and how far it could easily reach under furniture.

Our first test focused on cleaning out the tracks for a sliding window. We sprinkled a bit of oatmeal in each one, then scored the products on how much it effectively sucked up.

The integrated hose on the Flex Vac requires two-handed operation...
The integrated hose on the Flex Vac requires two-handed operation, but you can reach almost anywhere in your home with it.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

For our next test, we scored each product on how far under a nightstand or similar piece of furniture it could clean. We used a shelving rack with a 3" gap at the bottom, then attempted to clean as far as possible underneath.

Even with the crevice attachment, the Pet Hair Eraser didn't have a...
Even with the crevice attachment, the Pet Hair Eraser didn't have a great reach.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

Our last test for this metric built upon the previous and assessed how well these handheld vacuums could do at cleaning under an appliance, like a fridge or oven. We reduced the gap from the last test to 1.25" high, then repeated the same procedure, again scoring each vacuum on its maximum reach.

Battery Life


All of the products in this review are cordless, so it only made sense to compare and score the battery life of each model. Most of these products only have a single cleaning mode, but a few have a low and high power mode. For those with multiple settings, we calculated total runtime based on 70% usage on the low power mode and 30% usage on the higher power mode, as this seemed fairly representative of typical use, based on our testing experience. This test accounted for 15% of the final score for each handheld vacuum.

The Flex Vac has about 15 minutes of battery.
The Flex Vac has about 15 minutes of battery.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman

Convenience


Also worth 15% of the total score, our next metric focused on how easy and convenient to use each of these products are. In particular, we focused on how much each vacuum weighed and how it felt to hold, its bin capacity and ease of emptying, if it had a convenient option for tool storage, and how noisy it was while running.

We weighed the base of each vacuum without a tool and with the heaviest tool attached as the main component of our weight score. However, we also took into account how balanced each vacuum felt to hold with normal use.

This vacuum is highly portable and compact.
This vacuum is highly portable and compact.
Credit: Laura Casner

To compare the ease of emptying the bin, we scored each product on the mechanism that opens the bin and how easily the dirt and debris comes out of it — whether it always falls out on its own or if it needs assistance to be emptied. We also awarded points based on the size of the collection bin.

The dust bin and filter simply twist off the main unit.
The dust bin and filter simply twist off the main unit.
Credit: Laura Casner

Finally, we compared the ease of storing and swapping all of the different attachments that each of these products comes with. We gave the most points for integrated tools and the least for vacuums that required another whole box to store all the different attachments.

Pet Hair


For the last 10% of the total score, we compared how well each vacuum performed at picking up pet hair. We spread out some pet hair from a local groomer on the car carpet and on a couch cushion, then rated how well each vacuum cleaned both of these when using the most appropriate attachment.

The pet hair tool on the Flex Vac was surprisingly effective at...
The pet hair tool on the Flex Vac was surprisingly effective at cleaning up pet hair, even though it isn't motorized.
Credit: Jenna Ammerman