The world's most in-depth and scientific reviews of tech gear

Razor Hovertrax 2.0 Review

In our experience, the Razor is hard to ride without biting the dust
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Price:   $398 List | $199 at Amazon
Pros:  Lightweight
Cons:  Unstable, jerky, limited battery power
Manufacturer:   Razor
By Nick Miley, David Wise and Austin Palmer  ⋅  Jul 29, 2019
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37
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#14 of 14
  • Fun Factor - 50% 3
  • Outdoor Capabilities - 20% 3
  • Support - 20% 6
  • Battery - 10% 4

Our Verdict

The Hovertrax 2.0 is Razor's attempt to grab a piece of the hyper-competitive hoverboard market. The 2.0 self-balances, meaning that it will level the standing platform all on its own when powered on. Because of this, or despite it, we found this board to be unpredictable. Following our battery of tests, one tester was heard to mutter: "Well, at least they have good customer service."


Compare to Similar Products

 
Awards  Editors' Choice Award Editors' Choice Award Top Pick Award  
Price $398 List
$199.00 at Amazon
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Star Rating
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Pros LightweightFast, stable, all-terrain crusherStable at speed, nimble, inexpensiveSmooth ride, all-terrain master, good customer servicePlayful, inexpensive, long run time
Cons Unstable, jerky, limited battery powerLimited maneuverability, heavy, limited color optionsLimited range/ battery life, performance limited on soft surfacesNon-adjustable steering column, heavy, only two color optionsPoor on rough roads and off-pavement, a little sluggish
Bottom Line In our experience, the Razor is hard to ride without biting the dustThis burly hoverboard is fleet, stable, great off-road and competitively priced.Fast, fun and affordable, this machine is a gas on smooth surfaces.Not to be mistaken for a toy, the Ninebot S packs power and longevity across all terrain typesA quality product for those looking to save some money
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Rating Categories Razor Hovertrax 2.0 Swagtron T6 Swagtron T380 Segway Ninebot S Swagtron T1
Fun Factor (50%)
10
0
3
10
0
6
10
0
8
10
0
5
10
0
7
Outdoor Capabilities (20%)
10
0
3
10
0
8
10
0
4
10
0
7
10
0
4
Support (20%)
10
0
6
10
0
7
10
0
5
10
0
9
10
0
7
Battery (10%)
10
0
4
10
0
9
10
0
7
10
0
7
10
0
6
Specs Razor Hovertrax 2.0 Swagtron T6 Swagtron T380 Segway Ninebot S Swagtron T1
Measured Runtime 69 min 120 min 50 min 95 min 87 min
Measured Weight 19.9 lbs 31.7 lbs 22.1 lbs 29.6 lbs 22.8 lbs
Measured Speed 8.9 mph 11.9 mph 8.6 mph 10.5 mph 8.7 mph
Measured Range 3.4 mi 12 mi 4 mi 11.3 mi 7.9 mi
Weight Limit 220 lbs 220 lbs 44 - 220 lbs 88 - 220 lbs 44 - 220 lbs
Bluetooth No Yes; Music Yes; App & Music Yes; App No
Warranty 3 months limited 12 months limited 12 months limited Vehicle body: 12 months
Attachment parts: 6 months
Components subject to wear: 3 months
12 months limited
Color Options Blue
Green/Yellow
Black
Red
White
Desert Camo
Matte Black
Pink Camo
White
Black
Pink
Blue
White
Black
White
Blue
Black
Dark Red
Pink
Exclusive Gold
Measured Charge Time 2 hours, 40 min 2 hours, 20 min 1 hour, 25 min 2 hours, 40 min 1 hour, 20 min

Our Analysis and Test Results

The Hovertrax 2.0 is manufactured by the well known Razor company which has been making scooters for nearly two decades. Unfortunately, our testers found this board to be overly sensitive and unpredictable.

The Hovertrax 2.0 by Razor
The Hovertrax 2.0 by Razor

Performance Comparison


We buy all the hoverboards we test and run them through a standardized analysis of customer support, battery life, fun factor, and outdoor capabilities. The results of our analyses are quantifiable and reproducible. We make such painstaking efforts so that we can draw direct comparisons for one product to another and know that those comparisons are proportional.

Fun Factor


In this metric we analyze the factors that contribute to a board being fun. These are maneuverability, speed, color options, accessories, and weight. The Hovertrax cratered in this metric.

The Razor was agile to the point of twitchiness.
The Razor was agile to the point of twitchiness.

Our panel of riders rode this board through an obstacle course consisting of quick direction changes, a slalom, donuts, and a straightaway. They reported that this board is jerky and overly sensitive. The Hovertrax also left much to be desired in the power department. This shortcoming became evident when executing the mandatory back and forth maneuver as the lack of pick up in the motors would occasionally cause the rider to dismount the board rapidly.

The Razor Hovertrax 2.0 not only has a maximum weight limit of 220 lbs but limits the use of their boards to eight years of age and older

However, the board is available in five colors and easily fits into a third-party carrying cases. Cool! We clocked the Hovertrax at 8.9 mph, which surpassed the manufacturer's advertised max of 6 mph — that doesn't happen very often. However, we wouldn't recommend pushing this board to the max as if felt pretty unstable at that speed.

Outdoor Capabilities



Careful on the cracks! We actually broke the Razor driving over cracks and had to get a replacement from the manufacturer.
Careful on the cracks! We actually broke the Razor driving over cracks and had to get a replacement from the manufacturer.

The Hovertrax's lackluster performance continued in our outdoor capabilities tests. Our board broke during this phase of the analysis, and the company issued a replacement (we gave them points of that in the support metric). In this metric we test how these boards handle rough roads and off-pavement terrain. The Razor broke when passing over a crack in the street, thus proving that it does not fare well off flat, smooth surfaces.

This board felt a little squirrelly on the steeper hills.
This board felt a little squirrelly on the steeper hills.

Support


Support provided to the customer by the manufacturer is paramount for hoverboards. Case in point, our board's untimely demise during a routine test. As such, it is mandatory that the hoverboard manufacturer be relatively easy to contact and that they standby their product. Often this is as simple as providing knowledgeable, technical advice. Less common is the need for repair or replacement. The Razor delivered an above-average performance in this metric, though we wouldn't describe it as stellar.

While Razor did replace our board, we didn't have the best experience communicating with their support staff. However, we did get to talk to a human, which is more than we can say about some other companies. One may also make contact with Razor via email if they so desire. Finally, this board is sold with a 90-day limited warranty.

Battery


Hoverboards are not ridable when their batteries die. As such we test them for their run time, travel radius, and recharge time. This model only traveled 3.4 miles in our range test. This test is run on smooth, flat pavement, i.e., ideal surface conditions for a hoverboard. Making matters worse, the Hovertrax only lasted for 69 minutes in our obstacle course run time test.

The Hovertrax 2.0 had the shortest battery life of all the models we tested.
The Hovertrax 2.0 had the shortest battery life of all the models we tested.

Lastly, we recorded the time it takes for the battery to recharge after being thoroughly exhausted. This product took 160 minutes to charge, which is about average for the class.

Value


The Hovertrax 2.0 has several problems that, until resolved, will make it a poor value at any price.

Conclusion


In closing, we would like to say that we were pleased that Razor stood by their product throughout the warranty process. The staff was as helpful as they knew how to be and polite as well. However, our experience with the product itself was abysmal. Not simply a poor performer, this board failed to complete several of our tests. Moreover, it is the only board that testers refused to ride more than once because it made them feel uneasy. If you are looking for a hoverboard, any other board in this review will do better the Hovertrax.


Nick Miley, David Wise and Austin Palmer