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Halo Rover Review

Price:   $997 List
Pros:  Great at off-road and uneven terrain
Cons:  Expensive, heavy
Bottom line:  Great fun for the outdoors, but much more expensive than its direct competitors
Editors' Rating:   
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Manufacturer:   Halo

Our Verdict

The Halo Rover was the second of the all-terrain boards that we tested. While this board looks astonishingly similar to the Epikgo, and consequently scored identically in three of our rating metrics. This board has a good battery life, is quite fun to ride, and can handle cracked pavement, bumpy roads, and packed dirt or snow. However, this board retails for an additional hundred dollars, and didn't have quite the same level of support.


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Our Analysis and Hands-on Test Results

Review by:
David Wise and Austin Palmer

Last Updated:
Wednesday
November 23, 2016

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The Halo Rover is a good pick if most of your hoverboarding needs involve going off-road. This model has 8.5" knobby rubber tires that are perfectly suited for driving through the park or on the beach (if local regulations allow!). This board did include a carrying case at the time when we bought it — though this may be a limited time offer — but is a nice touch as this model is not going to fit any of the generic carrying cases available.

The Halo Rover.
The Halo Rover.

Performance Comparison


Fun Factor


This board overall did well on our fun factor test, earning an above average score of 6 out of 10. This score is primarily based on the opinion of our fun-loving, expert panel of testers throughout our obstacle course, but also included the top speed, as well as weight, available colors, accessories, and Bluetooth capabilities.

This board was a little slower and had a larger turning radius than the smaller models.
This board was a little slower and had a larger turning radius than the smaller models.

This board was well-received by our panel, which particularly liked that it was stable, and did well with rapid back and forth direction changes. This model is on the wider side, and the consensus was that it was a little harder and less fun to do sharper turns and spins. However, the biggest complaint with this board was when attempting any sort of distance at its maximum speed. The Halo Rover tends to "pushback" at its top speed, where the board will angle back to prevent you from going any faster, which can be exceptionally painful on the muscles in your lower legs after prolonged periods.

The Halo Rover is currently available in three colors: black, white, and pink — with white and pink being currently marked as limited edition. This board hit a top speed of 8.83 mph in our tests, comparing well with the manufacturer listed top speed of 9 mph. As mentioned earlier, this board will not fit in third-party accessories — at least not any that we found — but does come with its own carrying case. We received the case with the board, but it may have been a limited time offer, and at any rate, the case is available for purchase on the manufacturer's website.

The case made it exponentially easier to transport this heavy board.
The case made it exponentially easier to transport this heavy board.

This board also has a built-in Bluetooth speaker to play music while you ride, as well as a companion app to display statistics while riding, such as speed and battery life. One downside to this board is that is exceptionally heavy, weighing 31.9 pounds.

Outdoor Capabilities


Riding outdoors and off-road is where the Halo Rover shines, earning it a strong score of 7 out of 10. We tested how each board handled going over cracks in the road, clearing thresholds, as well as how it did over dirt, grass, and on steep, steep hills.

The Halo Rover was nice and stable throughout our steep hill test.
The Halo Rover was nice and stable throughout our steep hill test.

The Halo Rover did well across the board, doing exceptionally well at rolling over cracks and bumpy roads, as well as traversing grass. The large, knobby tires do a good job of riding over cracks, but can make the board vibrate slightly while riding. This board also did a good job at moving over hard-packed dirt and sand, feeling just like it was on pavement.

Dirt and Sand felt smooth as cement with the knobby tires on the Halo Rover.
Dirt and Sand felt smooth as cement with the knobby tires on the Halo Rover.

Support


Making up 20 percent of the total score, support is exceptionally important for this product category. These products can take a fair amount of abuse — as shown through our testing — but in the end can end up broken. The Halo Rover did all right in this metric, earning a 5 out of 10. We looked at the warranty provided with each product, the level of customer support we received from each manufacturer. Finally, we ranked how each board held up to our testing process by assessing what damage each one received.

While this company does have a contact phone number, we were told it was only for sales related questions and we would need to contact them via email for a technical problem. We received a form letter asking us to send in a video recording, and then only received mediocre support on fixing our problem. In the end, they did provide the information necessary to solve our problems, it just took longer than some of the other manufacturers. Halo offers a "12 month worry free guarantee" to cover any manufacturer defects.

This board held up quite well to our rigorous testing process, only sustaining minor scratches and losing the cover to the power button. This product did come with rubber bumpers to protect its outer shell, but these were very prone to falling off.

These scuffs could have been prevented  but the included rubber guard wouldn't stay attached and fell off immediately.
These scuffs could have been prevented, but the included rubber guard wouldn't stay attached and fell off immediately.

Battery


The final aspect of these products we analyzed was their battery life. The Halo Rover did well, meriting a 7 out of 10. This board had the second longest range of any that we tested, traveling 7.4 miles on flat, smooth pavement before it failed and would no longer balance. While this tested how far you could go on these boards, we also wanted to compare how long you could play on one.

Making it close to 7.5 miles in our range test  the Halo Rover could definitely be used for small trips around town.
Making it close to 7.5 miles in our range test, the Halo Rover could definitely be used for small trips around town.

We ran the board in circles, turns, a slalom course, back and forth segments, and a straightaway until it died, with our panel of expert testers. The Halo Rover did all right, lasting for 1 hour and 40 minutes before dying, the fourth longest of all the boards we tested, just narrowly edged out by the third place finisher. This board took about 2 hours and 40 minutes to charge, right in line with the expected 2-3 hours per the manufacturer's recommendations.

Value


While the Halo Rover is a solid board, it is not really the best value out there. There are less expensive, better performing boards available, including one suited for off-road use.

Conclusion


The Halo Rover is a good hoverboard that has strong outdoor capabilities, and is relatively fun to ride. However, this board only had average customer support, and has a list price that is higher than a nearly identical product, the Epikgo Classic. The Halo does have a built-in Bluetooth speaker and mobile app, and may come with a case, but it is up to you to decide if those features are worth the increased price.
David Wise and Austin Palmer

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Unbiased.