The world's most in-depth and scientific reviews of gear

Metroboard Slim Stealth Edition Review

This board is fast and has a phenomenal range, but it comes at a high price compared to other boards
The Metroboard Slim Stealth Edition
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Price:   $1,300 List
Pros:  Solid at climbing hills, excellent range
Cons:  heavy, pricey, low clearance
Manufacturer:   Metroboard
By David Wise and Austin Palmer  ⋅  Jan 2, 2018
  • Share this article:
Our Editors independently research, test, and rate the best products. We only make money if you purchase a product through our links, and we never accept free products from manufacturers. Learn more
65
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#5 of 8
  • Speed - 25% 6
  • Range - 20% 8
  • Ride - 20% 6
  • Hills - 15% 7
  • Build - 10% 5
  • Braking - 10% 6

Our Verdict

Performing quite well across the board, the Slim Stealth Edition with 20-Mile Battery from Metroboard finished close to the top of the pack. This board has an unmatched range of over 23 miles in our test and a top speed of close to 18 mph, but has a few drawbacks, precluding it from claiming an award. This board is very hefty, weighing in as one of the heaviest standard style skateboards that we tested and has very low clearance, with the Metroboard bottoming out a few times on cracks and bumps in the road. It can also be a little on the pricey side compared to its performance.


Compare to Similar Products

 
Awards  Editors' Choice Award Top Pick Award Best Buy Award Best Buy Award 
Price $1,300 List$1,400 List
$1,398.95 at Amazon
$1,800 List$950 List$999 List
$999 at Amazon
Star Rating
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Pros Solid at climbing hills, excellent rangeVery fast, great stopping power, does amazingly well at hillsFast, super fun to ride, handles extreme terrain with easeImpressive performance considering its price, super fun to ride, handles off-roading and rough pavement easilyCompact, fast, good at climbing hills
Cons heavy, pricey, low clearancePricey, expected better range with its priceHeavy, steeper learning curveHeavy, so-so rangeNot super comfortable for long distances, so-so range
Bottom Line This board is fast and has a phenomenal range, but it comes at a high price compared to other boardsIf you want one of the absolute best boards out there, the Plus is a great choiceCapable of traveling over almost anything and being fast enough to frighten, this board is by far the most fun to rideThe Pint is almost as capable as the full-sized Onewheel but retails for about half as muchThis pint-sized board packs a ton of punch and is a great value if you want a top-notch board
Overall Score Sort Icon
100
0
65
100
0
80
100
0
76
100
0
69
100
0
65
Rating Categories Slim Stealth Edition Boosted Plus Onewheel+ XR Onewheel Pint Boosted Mini X
Speed (25%)
10
0
6
10
0
9
10
0
7
10
0
6
10
0
7
Range (20%)
10
0
8
10
0
7
10
0
8
10
0
5
10
0
5
Ride (20%)
10
0
6
10
0
7
10
0
7
10
0
7
10
0
6
Hills (15%)
10
0
7
10
0
8
10
0
8
10
0
9
10
0
7
Build (10%)
10
0
5
10
0
8
10
0
7
10
0
7
10
0
8
Braking (10%)
10
0
6
10
0
9
10
0
9
10
0
9
10
0
7
Specs Slim Stealth Edition Boosted Plus Onewheel+ XR Onewheel Pint Boosted Mini X
Tested Maximum Speed 17.65 mph 22 mph 17 mph 14.16 mph 18.49 mph
Tested Maximum Range 23.4 mi. 14.5 mi. 16.3 mi. 10 mi. 10.8 mi.
Measured Weight 18.9 lbs 17.8 lbs. 27.1 lbs. 25.5 lbs 17.5 lbs.
Measured Uphiill Grade 15% + 15% + 15% + 15% + 15% +
Manufacturer Claimed Range 20 miles 14 miles 12 - 18 miles 6-8 miles 14 miles
Measured Charge Time 160 min. 115 min. 120 min. 120 min. 115 min.
Tested Stopping Distance 39 ft. 30 ft. 15 ft. 14 ft 34 ft.
Riding Modes 9
1 &2 reduce top speed and torque
each mode after 2 increases acceleration
(9 Acceleration / 4 Braking, from Beginner to Advanced), so that rider can fine tune according to their personal riding comfort and skill level.
4
Beginner
Eco
Expert
Pro
5
Sequoia
Cruz
Mission
Delirium
Elevated
4
Redwood
Pacific
Elevated
Skyline
3
Beginner
Eco
Expert
Battery 36V 8AH Lithium
600 Watt Continuous / 3000 Watt Peak
Lithium Ion Lithium Ion Lithium Ion (NMC) Lithium Ion
Deck Length 41 inches 38 inches 29.5 inches
2X 9 inch platforms
27 inches
2X 8 inch platforms
29.5 inches
Truck Witdth Caliber II 10" 50° Reverse Kingpin 7.5" N/A N/A 7.5"
Wheel Size 83 mm 85 mm 11 inch 10.5 inch 80 mm
App available No Yes Yes Yes Yes
Lighting Front and Rear No Yes Yes No

Our Analysis and Test Results

Metroboard Dual-Drive Stealth Edition
An updated, two-wheel drive version of this board is now available. With the base model retailing for about $600 more than the base model of the one-wheel drive version, this newer model is significantly more expensive. However, the two-wheel drive purportedly has a top speed of 24 mph and a range of 25 miles, putting it at the top of the pack. Unfortunately, it appears that this new board still has the same clearance issues that plagued the original product, made even scarier by the fact that you are going even faster. Having the motor mounts or belt guard suddenly drag and catch on rougher roads could cause quite a serious accident and we could advise caution when riding either of these on rougher roads. We haven't tested the two-wheel drive version yet, but we will further update this when we do.

The Metroboard is a solid performer and earned the third highest score out of all the boards. It was respectably fast and made it up most of the hills in our test. We had a few issues with the build on this board, but it's all around a great board. Unfortunately, the retail price is a little on the higher side, and it's not that much more expensive to get one of the top scorers.

Performance Comparison


We rode all of these products mile after mile and put them through a barrage of tests to see which one came out on top.

While not the best board  the Metroboard still did quite well in our evaluation.
While not the best board, the Metroboard still did quite well in our evaluation.

Speed


Speed was our most important metric, comprising 25% of the total score. This score was determined by the results of two tests, tested maximum speed, and acceleration. The Metroboard did fairly well, earning an overall score of 6 out of 10. First, we determined the top speed of each model. We gave the Metroboard plenty of runway to build up to its top speed, then timed how long it took to complete a 200' test section.


This board hit a respectable 17.65 mph. Our acceleration test was conducted in a similar way, except the board was started from a standstill. This board did very well and had great acceleration, but the one-wheel drive proved problematic.

The single wheel drive on the Metroboard caused some interesting quirks in our acceleration test.
The single wheel drive on the Metroboard caused some interesting quirks in our acceleration test.

This board had a tendency to want to burn out and refuse to drive in a straight line if you weren't prepared for it.

The Metroboard had plenty of range to keep even our most dedicated skateboard testers satisfied.
The Metroboard had plenty of range to keep even our most dedicated skateboard testers satisfied.

Range


This metric was also scored with two tests, the first being how far the board traveled in a medium riding profile, and the second, how long it took to charge the board. This board took home the top score in this metric with an 8 out of 10. It traveled the furthest out of all the boards.


This board traveled 23.4 miles in total, with the board slowing down a little bit at the halfway point, and severely dropping the speed for the last 4 miles or so. This board took around 2 hours, 40 minutes to recharge after being completely depleted, in line with the manufacturer's claimed time of 1-3 hours.

The Metroboard didn't have the best ride  but it was a close runner-up.
The Metroboard didn't have the best ride, but it was a close runner-up.

Ride


The Metroboard delivered an above average performance in this metric, earning a 6 out of 10. We assessed how drawn to the board we were, how comfortable it was to ride, how it handled bumps in the road, and whether or not an unexpected crack threw you for a loop. The Metroboard is a stable performer, and we were quite content to grab this board for a quick errand. It's comfortable to ride and handles bumps and uneven roads relatively well. However, this board has exceptionally low clearance on the motor mount and is prone to bottoming out on cracks, leading to some unpleasant noise and less than attractive scuffs on the underside of the board.

Hills


This metric's score was based entirely on a single test: How steep of a hill could this board climb? In the case of the Metroboard, we found it failed at the 23% test slope, but excelled at the 15% one, earning it a 7 out of 10. This board held its own, and while it was the slowest of the boards that made it up the 15% grade to reach the summit, it still made it. The single motor powertrain made it about 6' up the 23% hill — not enough to qualify as a pass.

We found the build of the Metroboard to be about average.
We found the build of the Metroboard to be about average.

Build


The Metroboard had an average build score of 5 out of 10. This was based on the board's weight, the ergonomics of the remote, how responsive the board was to the remote, if the board had regenerative braking, and whether or not the customer support was actually helpful.


This board does have regenerative braking, but it lost quite a few points by being one of the heavier models that we tested, weighing in at 18.9 lbs. This is significantly more than some of the other modes.


The remote felt alright, but it seemed a little cheap to us. It is powered by a pair of AA batteries and has 9 different riding modes to choose from. It responds quickly to inputs from the remote. We struggled to contact this company via phone, but there are contact email and mailing addresses to reach them. There is a 6-month warranty and a 7-day return policy, the full details of which can be found on their website.

Braking


The Metroboard did slightly above average in our braking test, earning a 6 out of 10. We determined this score by how well the board did at controlling our descent speed when heading down a hill, and how quickly we could stop from a medium speed on flat ground.

This board did a good job of slowing down to almost a complete stop on the 15% grade but had a tendency to fishtail around a bit on the steeper hills. You would still slow down, but you sacrifice a ton of control. This board took about 39' to stop when traveling about 12 mph. This wasn't the shortest stopping distance.


Value


This board is a little on the pricey side to be a value pick, but it might be a good option if you want to save a little from the top scorers.

Conclusion


This board delivered a runner-up performance at a runner-up price tag. It lagged behind the top scoring model by a bit but was between $150-$200 less expensive. This board is a strong performer, and won't let you down, but it can get stumped by the steeper hills. All in all, this is a great board — not the top performer, but not the most expensive.


David Wise and Austin Palmer