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The Best VR Headsets of 2019

Wednesday March 20, 2019
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We bought the 14 best virtual reality headsets you can get in 2019 — both mobile, tethered, and standalone — and rated them against each other to see which ones are truly the best of the best. We ranked and compared almost every aspect of these products, scoring the difficulty of the set-up and installation, their visual immersiveness and interactiveness, and overall user-friendliness. We also looked at how comfortable each headset is to wear for extended periods of time. Check out the full review below to see which VR headset is the best bet for you!


Top 14 Product Ratings

Displaying 1 - 5 of 14
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Awards  Editors' Choice Award  Editors' Choice Award  
Price $1,399 List
$1,399 at Amazon
$499 List
Check Price at Amazon
$500 List
$264.00 at Amazon
$199 List
$199 at Amazon
$400 List
Star Rating
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Pros Exceptionally comfortable, incredibly immersive, tons of interactivenessHighly interactive, incredibly immersive, comfortableExceptionally visually immersive, very user friendly, highly interactiveExtremely easy to use, exceptionally user-friendly, very visually immersiveHighly interactive, incredibly easy to set-up
Cons Exorbitantly expensiveExpensive, difficult setup processNot super comfortable, only works with PlayStationExperiences more limited than tethered headsetsPricey, limited library of games compared to other platforms
Bottom Line It’s the best of the best if money is truly no objectThe Vive is the best of the best and the perfect pick for the VR enthusiastThe PlayStation VR is a fantastic introduction to VR gaming, provided you already own a PS4The Go is an excellent, all-around headset that makes great VR experiences available to everyoneWhile the 6-DOF motion tracking is quite cool, the Mirage is hampered by its high price and limited number of experiences
Overall Score Sort Icon
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83
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74
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Rating Categories HTC Vive Pro HTC Vive PlayStation VR Oculus Go Lenovo Mirage Solo
Interactiveness (35%)
10
0
9
10
0
9
10
0
7
10
0
6
10
0
6
Visual Immersiveness (20%)
10
0
9
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9
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9
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8
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8
Comfort (20%)
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8
10
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7
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6
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7
10
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7
User Friendliness (15%)
10
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9
10
0
8
10
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8
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9
10
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8
Ease Of Setup (10%)
10
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4
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4
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7
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9
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10
Specs HTC Vive Pro HTC Vive PlayStation VR Oculus Go Lenovo Mirage Solo
Phones that fit N/A N/A N/A N/A, but smartphone required for initial setup N/A
Adjustable Lenses Only side to side Only side to side No, need to move the headset around No No
Sound Integrated Headphone Jack or PC Headphone Jack or TV Built-in, or headphone jack Headphones
Available Controllers / Remotes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Field of View 110 110 100 101 110
Refresh Rate 90Hz 90Hz 120Hz, 90Hz 60Hz or 72Hz 75Hz
Room For Glasses? Yes A little tight, but the Oculs Rift is tighter - Fits fine with glasses, but lets in a lot more light Snug; there is a glasses spacer included. You can also opt for perscription lenses Yes. They can be a little snug with larger glasses

Best Overall VR Headset


HTC Vive


Editors' Choice Award
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$499
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80
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Interactiveness 9
  • Visual Immersiveness 9
  • Comfort 7
  • User Friendliness 8
  • Ease of Setup 4
Tethered or Mobile: Tethered | Field of View: 110°
Highly interactive
Great visual immersiveness
Comfortable
Pricey
Hard to set up

Claiming one of the top spots overall, the HTC Vive is our top recommendation for someone who wants the best of the best when it comes to VR headsets. This top-of-the-line headset does an excellent job at providing a high-quality, visually immersive and interactive VR experience. It is exceptionally accurate at tracking your movement with no noticeable latency issues and a pair of VR-specific controllers allow you to easily interact with and manipulate objects in your virtual environment. There is a large library of diverse VR content you can use with the Vive, ranging from immersive documentaries, thrilling horror movies, and ridiculously fun games that all really make you feel like you are in an alternate reality and provide countless hours of entertainment.

Unfortunately, this product is definitely aimed at someone who is exceptionally tech-savvy and is a VR enthusiast. It can definitely be a bit of work to get the headset set up and connected properly to your computer and get all of the software configured properly. Speaking of your computer, the Vive has somewhat intensive minimum system requirements, meaning that you are looking at spending another $800 to $1200 on top of an already pricey VR headset if you don't already have a high-end gaming computer. However, the Vive is definitely the best of the best when it comes to VR and is well worth the price for the true VR aficionado.

Read review: HTC Vive

If Money is No Object


HTC Vive Pro


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$1,399.00
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83
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Interactiveness 9
  • Visual Immersiveness 9
  • Comfort 8
  • User Friendliness 9
  • Ease of Setup 4
Tethered or Mobile: Tethered | Field of View: 110°
Highly interactive
Great visual immersiveness
Comfortable
Pricey
Hard to set up

While the HTC Vive did claim the Editors' Choice award and is our top recommendation for most people if they are looking for a top-notch headset, we thought the Vive Pro did receive a slightly higher score. We found it to be a tiny bit more comfortable and has integrated noise-canceling headphones, as well as slightly more impressive visual specifications.

However, it is significantly more expensive than the original Vive. The starter bundle with sensors and controllers retails at a price bordering on exorbitant, especially if you consider the hefty investment in a gaming PC powerful enough to run it. On top of that, it still is going to cost you quite a bit to buy just the headset alone — what you would do if you are just upgrading from the original Vive. It's a great option if you have a limitless budget, but is way more than most people will want to spend on VR. We found it quite hard to justify the huge price jump with what we felt were slight improvements, even with the built-in noise-canceling headphones — you can still save money and buy an exceptionally nice pair of headphones to use with original Vive.

Read review: HTC Vive Pro

A Great Upgrade


Vive Wireless Adapter


The Vive Wireless Adapter

$299.99
at Amazon
See It

Give you way more freedom
Makes VR experiences more immersive
Pricey
Requires an expensive adapter to use with the Vive Pro
If you are looking for an accessory and the Vive or Vive Pro didn't completely blow your budget, then it is worth considering the wireless adapter. It is quite awesome to get rid of the tether and move around the room completely unobstructed. This really adds to the immersiveness and interactiveness of the experience and makes it even easier to lose yourself in a virtual world — to the point where it is almost disconcerting.

However, this is a pricey add-on, made even more expensive if you need to get the Vive Pro adapter. You definitely don't need it to have a fantastic virtual reality experience, but you should consider it if you have the money — it makes a worthy addition to your VR rig.

Best Mobile VR Headset


Oculus Go


The Oculus Go  a standalone VR headset.
Editors' Choice Award
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$199.00
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74
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Interactiveness 6
  • Visual Immersiveness 8
  • Comfort 7
  • User Friendliness 9
  • Ease of Setup 9
Tethered or Mobile: Mobile | Field of View: 101°
Incredibly easy to use
Highly interactive for a mobile headset
Very comfortable
Little more expensive than other mobile headsets
Visuals are slightly inferior to tethered models

Earning the highest score out of any of the mobile headsets, the Oculus Go easily claimed the title of Best Mobile Headset. This standalone VR device is completely self-contained — even having built-in speakers — forgoing the need for an expensive, high-end gaming computer or a flagship smartphone to power the headset. The Go is by far the most user-friendly out of practically all of the headsets that we have tested, only requiring you to power it up and put it on before you are ready to go. It also is quite comfortable to wear and the initial setup takes less than 15 minutes, making it an approachable VR option for those that aren't terribly tech-savvy.

However, the visual immersiveness of the Go definitely can't match that of the tethered headsets, like the HTC Vive. The Go also isn't the most comfortable to wear with glasses, but you can order custom corrective lenses for the Go to remedy this — for a non-trivial price. Your face also tends to get quite sweaty when wearing the Go for long periods of time. Despite these few drawbacks, the Go is by far our favorite mobile VR headset and is a fantastic option for those that want to try out VR without a ton of hassle or a hefty investment.

Read review: Oculus Go

Best on a Tight Budget


Google Cardboard


The Google Cardboard.
Best Buy Award
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$15.00
at Amazon
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47
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Interactiveness 2
  • Visual Immersiveness 6
  • Comfort 4
  • User Friendliness 7
  • Ease of Setup 9
Tethered or Mobile: Mobile | Field of View: 90°
Inexpensive
Very easy setup
Uncomfortable
Lacks adjustability

Hands down, the Cardboard headset by Google is the cheapest way to try out virtual reality. This simplistic headset is compatible with a wide range of smartphones, and provides a surprisingly visually immersive experience, especially given its humble appearance. It has a single button to allow you to interact with your VR experience and is one of the easiest headsets to set up and operate.

However, there are clearly going to be some concessions made with the bare-bones nature of this product when you compare it to models that cost several hundred dollars. The Cardboard needs to be held up to your face and — made of cardboard — isn't all that comfortable to wear. You can't really interact with this device in ways close to the top headsets, as this model lacks any sort of hand controllers. Despite these not insignificant flaws, the Cardboard makes it a great option for someone who isn't necessarily a tech expert but wants to give VR a try without breaking the bank. This all combines to earn the Google Cardboard the Best Buy award.

Read review: Google Cardboard

Best for Star Wars fans


Lenovo Star Wars: Jedi Challenges


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$85
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53
OVERALL
SCORE
  • Interactiveness 5
  • Visual Immersiveness 5
  • Comfort 4
  • User Friendliness 6
  • Ease of Setup 8
Tethered or Mobile: Mobile | Field of View: 60°
Easy to set up
Lightsaber battles
Less comfortable than other products
Limited experiences

Have you always wanted to see how you would do at fighting off the dark forces of the Empire or the First Order? The Lenovo Star Wars: Jedi Challenges finally gives you that opportunity, allowing you to take up the mantle of a Jedi Knight. This augmented reality headset is tons of fun and highly interactive with its lightsaber controller. This allows you to take part in lightsaber duels against various opponents, practice your command skills and control forces in battle, or perfect your holochess game.

Unfortunately, you are restricted to the games and experiences specifically designed for this headset, meaning that the library of available options will always be significantly more limited than what is available on the other headsets. This headset is also on the pricey side for a mobile headset, making the limited library all the more painful. However, it is a ton of fun and is definitely worth considering for the Star Wars fans out there, mainly due to the fact that getting to fight with (virtual) lightsabers is totally awesome. Period.

Read review: Lenovo Star Wars: Jedi Challenges


VR headsets ready for testing.
VR headsets ready for testing.

Why You Should Trust Us?


Here at TechGearLab, we bought all of the VR systems in this review at retail prices — just like you would — and won't ever accept any free or sample products from manufacturers so you can be sure that our reviews are completely unbiased. Our lead tester, Austin Palmer, has been playing video games for nearly 3 decades. He has played many generations, if not all, of the major platforms even some of the more obscure including the Nintendo Virtual Boy and the Tiger Electronics R-Zone that somewhat resemble VR headsets. Austin is also very adept at PC gaming, always engaging in the most difficult end game content available, consistently reaching leaderboards, or completing games 100%.

We set up a dedicated room just for our VR testing and have spent hundreds and hundreds of hours testing and playing games with the different VR systems. We specifically graded each headset in 25 different side-by-side tests to determine the scores and had a panel of judges try out each headset to get a better opinion of how the lenses worked for different people and how each headset fit different faces.

Related: How We Tested VR Headsets


Analysis and Test Results


We grouped our tests into five weighted testing metrics — Visual Immersiveness, Comfort, User Friendliness, Ease of Setup, and Interactiveness, as well as discussing the value of each headset when you compare their cost to their performance.

Related: Buying Advice for VR Headsets

Value


When it comes to VR headsets, there are two distinct types: mobile and tethered. Tethered headsets are significantly more expensive than mobile and require much more expensive additional components to run — think a $1000 gaming computer. However, these are much better than mobile models in terms of interactiveness and visual immersiveness. If you already have a gaming computer and are shopping on a budget, then the original Vive by HTC is a great choice. If this is still too pricey, then you should consider a mobile headset. The Oculus Go is the best you can get when it comes to mobile headsets, being very easy to use and highly interactive.

If the price tag for the Go is giving you sticker shock, you can go with the Daydream View or the Gear VR, provided you have a compatible smartphone. Both of these headsets cost less than the Go but aren't quite as nice. If you are shopping on the tightest of budgets, but are determined to try out VR, then the Google Cardboard is the way to go. This is definitely the cheapest way to try out VR, essentially being a cardboard box with lenses that holds your smartphone.

In the zone.
In the zone.

Interactiveness


Earning the most weight out of all the metrics in our test, Interactiveness accounts for 35% of the total score for each headset. To evaluate the performance of each headset in this test, we conducted three different tests. The first test was how easy it is to interact with each device, whether there were buttons or a touchpad on the device itself or if there is a handheld controller that is used. The second test was comparing the motion tracking capabilities of the headset, whether it was 3-DOF or 6-DOF sensing and how well the position of the hand controller was monitored. 3-DOF refers to a headset that only monitors where you are looking from a fixed point, while 6-DOF refers to a headset that tracks where you are looking, as well as where you move — in the space covered by the sensors. This brings us to the third test we conducted, which was the area of coverage by the sensors.


Tying for the highest score of the group, the HTC Vive and the Vive Pro earned a phenomenal 9 out of 10 for its unmatched performance when it came to our Interactiveness tests. These headsets both can be used with two Vive-specific handheld controllers specifically made for VR or can also be used with a standard Xbox or PlayStation controller that is hooked up to the computer. These are very ergonomic and comfortable to hold — one of our favorite designs of the group.

Both the Vive Pro and the Vive are 6-DOF (Degrees of Freedom) headsets and have their stock sensor configurations have the largest coverage area of the entire group. The sensors adequately covered the entirety of our testing room, with our only real limitation being the tether when walking around.

Don't look down! Walking the plank 20 stories up.
Don't look down! Walking the plank 20 stories up.

This is where the wireless adapter comes in, allowing you to easily move around the entire area covered by the sensors without restrictions.


We found the Vive headsets to be the most accurate at tracking motion in our tests — by far the best of the entire group by a wide margin. The Vive models rely on a pair of sensors, either mounted on the wall or on a tripod. We had almost no issues with these sensors losing track of our position when using either the Vive Proor the Vive — even when we turned completely around and were facing away from the sensors. This amazing accuracy also carried over to tracking the position of the controllers, with it being the most accurate of the bunch in our tests.

Next, the PlayStation VR earned the next highest score in this metric, meriting a 7 out of 10 for its performance. It was exceptionally easy to interact with this VR headset using the PlayStation Move controller system, even though there are no buttons or touchpads on the headset itself.

The PlayStation camera uses the lights on the visor and controllers to track you in VR.
The PlayStation camera uses the lights on the visor and controllers to track you in VR.

We did find that this model has some limitations when it came to sensor coverage, only adequately covering a space about 7' in front of the camera. Stepping any further back would cause the screen to black out — something a few of our testers encountered when backing up rapidly from a shark in one of the underwater VR experiences. This model also had the most limited motion tracking of all of the tethered headsets, struggling to track you if you turned around while using the Move controllers.

We also found it to be a little finicky when tracking the position of the Move controllers, with the controllers slightly shifting position throughout the game. There were also a non-trivial amount of instances where the controllers were unresponsive in our testing process.

Our pair of standalone headsets came next, with the Lenovo Mirage Solo and the Oculus Go both earning a 6 out of 10 for the level of interactiveness that these headsets provide.

The Oculus Go did exceptionally well in our motion tracking tests and we found that we had to center the remote and rest it much less frequently than other mobile headsets. There are also a handful of buttons on the remote control, to allow you to further interact with your virtual environment. However, you are limited to a stationary position, like all mobile headsets.

The Go has a simple and easy to use remote.
The Go has a simple and easy to use remote.

The Lenovo Mirage is actually a 6-DOF motion tracking headset — a rarity for an untethered model without external sensors. However, we didn't really feel this made it all that much more interactive, as it only works in a limited area (10-15 sq. ft. or so) before displaying an error message and this set of functionality is only supported by a handful of VR experiences at the moment.

This headset utilizes essentially the same remote as the Google Daydream View — not our favorite with the lack of trigger button — and has some basic controls on the headset itself (volume keys and power button). Unfortunately, we found that we had to reset the controller's center quite a bit to keep it pointing in close to the right direction,

The Acer AH101 came next, earning a 5 out of 10 for its average level of interactivity. The motion tracking controllers are decent, but they weren't our favorite, with the touchpads being a little finicky to respond.

The standard controller across Windows Mixed Reality headsets.
The standard controller across Windows Mixed Reality headsets.

We also found the motion tracking to be somewhat flawed in our tests, with the controllers tending to jump around — much more than the PSVR.

The Star Wars: Jedi Challenges also earned a 5 out of 10. The Star Wars headset relies on an external sensor orb, allowing you to move throughout the room — something the other mobile headsets lack. You use the lightsaber as a controller and it seems relatively responsive, though the motion tracking can get a bit laggy in the most intense lightsaber fights.

A Padawan focused on his training.
A Padawan focused on his training.

The Google Daydream View and the Samsung Gear VR performing the second-best in this metric, both earning a 4 out of 10.

When it came to interacting with the headset, we found the Gear VR to have a slight edge over the Daydream View. Both of these mobile headsets have handheld remotes, but the Gear VR also has a directional touchpad and both home and back buttons on the headset itself.

The Daydream View only has a handheld remote for control. All of the mobile headsets are limited to 3-DOF, meaning you can look all around you, but they are intended for you to be sitting down or standing in a stationary position.

Both of these mobile headsets did an acceptable job at tracking the position of the handheld remote, though you did need to reset the controller center direction occasionally to align with the direction you are actually facing, as they both would tend to drift a tiny bit the longer you used the headset. This is an extremely quick process, done by simply holding down a button until the direction re-centered.

The bulk of the mobile headsets came next, with the Canbor VR, Google Cardboard, the VR SHINECON, and the Merge VR all earning a 2 out of 10 for their relatively subpar performance in this metric.

The Canbor does have a handheld remote, but we found it to be significantly inferior to that of the Gear VR or Daydream View. It also had exceptionally limited functionality when paired with an iOS phone. It generally felt slow and unresponsive.

Neither the Cardboard, SHINECON, or the Mergehave a handheld remote, instead of having one or two buttons on the top of the device that will interact with the touchscreen on your phone when pressed.

All of these headsets were the same in terms of sensor coverage, all being 3-DOF headsets that allowed you to look around in every direction, but not move around. The head tracking seemed fine on all of these, but none of these headsets tracked the position of the controller.

Finishing out the back of the pack, the Bnext VR earned a 1 out of 10 for its overall abysmal performance when it came to Interactiveness. There aren't any buttons on the handset or a handheld controller. It allows you to look around from a stationary position but doesn't track any other motion.

The PlayStation camera has some trouble tracking if it is too dark in the room.
The PlayStation camera has some trouble tracking if it is too dark in the room.

Visual Immersiveness


Ranking behind Interactiveness in terms of significance, our Visual Immersiveness metric merited 20% of the total score. We compared how well each VR headset blocked out ambient light, the field of view, the sharpness of the image, as well as the overall viewing quality.


The trio of tethered headsets — the Vive Pro, the Vive, and the PlayStation VR — all tied for the top spot, as well as the Samsung Gear VR and the Daydream View, each earning a 9 out of 10 for their exceptional performances. These mobile headsets held its own against the significantly more expensive tethered models, even exceeding their performance when it came to blocking out ambient light. The Gear VR completely blocked the all of the light from the room from entering the headset for the majority of our testers, while the Daydream only let in a tiny amount. The HTC Vive, Vive Pro, and the PlayStation VR all blocked the majority of the light, but all four suffered from a slight light leak around the bridge of the nose, depending on the shape of your nose. However, none of them let in enough light to be distracting.


However, we found that the Vive Pro, with its resolution of 1440x1600 pixels per eye, claims the top spot when it comes to the sharpness of the image, followed by the PlayStation VR, then by the original Vive. The HTC Vive has a resolution of 1080x1200 per eye, but the text just didn't see as sharp and crisp. The PlayStation VR has a reduced resolution of 960x1080 per eye, but we found it slightly easier to read text than the Vive.

The HTC Vive and Vive Pro have some of the largest fields of view out of any of the headsets that we tested, measuring in at 110°. Next, the Canbor VR, Oculus Go, SHINECON, and the Gear VR had the next largest field of view, with just over 100°, and the Daydream following.


In addition to the manufacturer specifications, we also used a test image to compare the field of view of each headset, noting how much of the image we could see when wearing each headset to check relative performance.

The tethered headsets all have exceptional viewing quality overall, with the Gear VR and Daydream just the tiniest bit behind them.

The resolution of the display of the mobile headsets depends on what mobile phone is used, but we found the viewing quality to be fantastic when using a Samsung S8 or Google Pixel XL phone.

The Oculus Go and the Lenovo Mirage both trailed slightly behind the frontrunners, earning an 8 out of 10 when it came to their visual immersiveness.

We found the image quality on the Oculus Go to be slightly sharper than the Gear VR and the Daydream, but the overall viewing quality is about the same. These three headsets all have a similar field of view. However, the Go lets in quite a bit more ambient light, especially when worn with glasses, which dropped its overall score down by a point.

You can put this VR headset on and "Go".
You can put this VR headset on and "Go".

The Mirage by Lenovo has very similar overall viewing quality to the Oculus Go, but it does have a slightly wider field of view — putting it about on par with the Vive. It has a screen with identical specs to the Go, measuring in at 5.5" with a resolution of 1280x1440 per eye. However, it does an even better job at blocking out ambient light, essentially keeping all of it out and we didn't experience any frustrating video lag when using it.

We had this headset ready to go out of the box in less than five minutes.
We had this headset ready to go out of the box in less than five minutes.

Following this top group, the Google Cardboard and the Acer AH101 came next, both earning a 6 out of 10 for its above-average showing in our Visual Immersiveness metric. The Cardboard lets in significantly more light than the Daydream — understandable, since this headset is made from rigid cardboard, rather than a more form-fitting, softer material. The field of view is slightly less than the Daydream, with similar sharpness and viewing quality when using the Pixel XL.

The Acer has one of the highest resolutions out of any model that we tested at 1440 x 1440 per eye, but text still appears a little out of focus when it is near the periphery of the field of view. The field of view on this product is also a little narrower than the top headset, but the overall viewing quality is above average. The Aver also blocks most ambient light from entering the viewing area.

Next, the Lenovo Star Wars, the Bnext, the SHINECON, and the Merge VR all earned a 5 out of 10 for their somewhat mediocre performance when it came to being visually immersive.

The Star Wars headset is AR, so it purposefully lets in the ambient light to superimpose the content over your physical environment. The resolution depends on the phone, like the other mobile headsets, but we did find the narrow field of view to be a bit crippling, especially in the faster-paced lightsaber battles.

The Bnext let an abundance of light in, while the Merge actually did a fantastic job of blocking light, only rivaled by the Samsung Gear VR. The Bnext had the widest field of view out of this group of two, followed by the Merge.

The Merge had alright viewing quality, with the image being slightly zoomed in and the text is shown with some sort of small distortion. The Bnext was much worse, showing even more distortion.

The SHINECON had a wide field of view and alright viewing quality, but we routinely struggled to get an image in focus with the way it holds the smartphone, making it really hard to read the text as there was plenty of distortion.

Rounding out the back of the pack, the Canbor earned a 2 out of 10 for its relatively poor performance. This headset lets in about the same amount of light as the Bnext, but is very hard to adjust to correctly set the focal adjustment, causing tons of distortion to any text shown and usually ending with eye strain and a solid headache. The Canbor does have a decently wide field of view, but it's hard to overcome its abysmal viewing quality.

The Samsung Gear is comfortable enough to sleep in.
The Samsung Gear is comfortable enough to sleep in.

Comfort


Ranking next in our review, our Comfort rating metric accounts for 20% of the total score. While all of the headsets will feel slightly awkward and foreign at first, this feeling dissipates rapidly with the more comfortable headsets, while other models just never really felt that comfortable. They would be fine for a short experience or two, but would severely detract from the virtual reality if worn for long periods of time. To determine scores for this metric, we compared how each headset felt on your face, whether or not it made your face sweaty, and if there was sufficient room to wear glass.


Earning the top score out of all of the headsets that we tested, the Samsung Gear VR and the Daydream View are by far the most comfortable out of the entire group. The Gear VR is quite comfortable to wear — even for long periods of time, with a cushion that prevents any pressure points on your face. It also had more than enough room to wear over a pair of glasses and an adequate amount of ventilation to keep the optics from fogging up.

First time experiencing VR.
First time experiencing VR.

The latest edition of the Daydream View has plenty of room to comfortably wear glasses and overall just feels much more comfortable and form-fitting on your face. The addition of the top strap also holds the headset much more securely, making it much less likely to move out of focus in the course of your VR experience.

While the handheld remote makes using the Daydream a decently interactive experience  it's nothing compared to the top tethered headsets.
While the handheld remote makes using the Daydream a decently interactive experience, it's nothing compared to the top tethered headsets.

The Vive Pro came next, meriting an 8 out of 10. It has more than enough space for most styles of glasses and does by far the best job at keeping your face from getting sweaty of the tethered models. It also has tons of padding and none of our judges noted any uncomfortable pressure points when wearing it, even when they had it on for extended periods.

You can move the integrated headphones out of the way when putting the headset on.
You can move the integrated headphones out of the way when putting the headset on.

Following the Gear VR and the Daydream View, the Oculus Go, the HTC Vive, and the Mirage Solo all tied when it comes to comfort, each earning a 7 out of 10.

The Vive conforms to your face very well, but not quite as well as the Gear VR. It has about the same amount of ventilation as the Samsung Gear VR, but it has substantially less room to fit glasses into. You can wear glasses with this headset, but just barely. It has some ventilation, so you won't get excessively sweaty right off the bat, but you will definitely start to sweat if you

The Oculus Go is also very comfortable to wear and matches the contours of your face quite well. However, it is quite cramped to wear with glasses, even when using the included spacers. We also found the image sharpness degraded slightly when using this space, appearing less sharp than before. There also is an option to purchase prescription lenses for this headset — a somewhat unique trait — if you require glasses. Unfortunately, we also found that the Go doesn't have the best ventilation, meaning you are definitely in for a very sweaty face after wearing this headset for extended periods of time.

The Lenovo Mirage conforms to your face just as well as the Oculus Go, having more than enough padding to prevent any pressure points. However, it is quite a bit heavier, weighing in at 23.5 oz. compared to the 16.6 oz. of the Go. This isn't terribly noticeable at first, but we definitely felt the additional weight in our necks after using the Mirage for extended periods of time. The Mirage also doesn't have a ton of ventilation, so you for sure will get quite sweaty if you are wearing it in warm climates or for long periods of time. We did really like that there is a decent amount of space if you need to wear glasses while wearing the headset.


Next, the Merge VR, Acer AH101, and the PlayStation VR all earned a 6 out of 10 in our comfort test. The Merge VR, Acer, and the PlayStation VR felt more comfortable to wear, with the Merge VR constructed entirely of a squishy foam material, while the Acer and PlayStation VR has a form-fitting cushion that makes it comfortable to wear for long periods of time.

The PlayStation VR has sufficient room for glasses to be worn, but the Merge and Acer are quite cramped when worn with glasses, especially those with larger frames.

The Bnext was about average in terms of comfort. The Bnext is mediocre in terms of comfort and the fit is very snug. It is also about average in terms of breathability, helping to bring some air flow in.

Next, the Google Cardboard, the VR SHINECON, and Star Wars: Jedi Challenges all earned a 4 out of 10, while the Canbor again rounded out the bottom of the pack with a 3 out of 10. The Google Cardboard is by far the least comfortable out of all the headsets to wear on your face but has plenty of room for glasses and more than enough ventilation to keep the lenses from fogging up.

The Cardboard is equipped with a button to interact with menus on-screen.
The Cardboard is equipped with a button to interact with menus on-screen.

The Star Wars headset isn't terribly comfortable, feeling quite awkward and unbalanced to wear. It also doesn't have a ton of ventilation or space for spectacles.

The Canbor and the SHINECON is only a little more comfortable to wear than the Cardboard, but the CANBOR has absolutely no room whatsoever for glasses and only has mediocre breathability. You might be able to wear glasses with the SHINECON, but they are definitely going to be pushed up against your face in a most uncomfortable way.

Some headsets can be a little tight getting on  especially if you wear glasses.
Some headsets can be a little tight getting on, especially if you wear glasses.

User Friendliness


Accounting for 15% of the total score, this metric evaluates and assesses the overall experience for the user while using the headset. We compared the audio system of each headset, whether it was built-in or if you are meant to connect external headphones, how much work it took to get the headset ready to use, whether or not you were prone to hitting buttons inadvertently, and for the mobile VR platforms, whether or not you need to remove the case from your phone before use.


Taking home the top score out of the entire group, the Oculus Go, the Vive Pro, and the Acer AH101-D8EY all tied for the top score of 9 out of 10 in this metric.

The Go is one of the most user-friendly headsets that we have seen, being one of the first standalone headsets. This product has built-in speakers, as well as the option to easily plug in a pair of headphones for improved sound quality. All you need to do is power it up and put it on and you are all set to enter the virtual world of your choice. It has a power button and volume controls on the headset itself, but these are almost impossible to hit inadvertently.

The Go is extremely user friendly.
The Go is extremely user friendly.

Also, the Go is a fully-standalone headset, meaning that you don't need to insert your phone or plug it into a tether, making it much less work to get set up than almost any other headset that we have tested to date.

The Vive Pro also has integrated headphones built in, circumventing the need to attach an external pair. This pair is also exceptionally easy to use once the initial setup has been completed, only requiring you to don them in view of the sensors.

The Vive Pro does have volume adjustment keys on the headset itself, but they are well out of the way and quite hard to hit accidentally.

Ranking behind the Oculus headset and the Acer, the HTC Vive, the Mirage Solo, and the PlayStation VR all received and 8 out of 10 for their excellent performances. The Vive and the PSVR both have an audio port to plug in external headphones if you want the full VR experience, but also will play sound through the computer or TV speakers if headphones are not connected. However, we did find that the earbuds are more likely to be pulled out accidentally when using the Vive compared to the PlayStation VR.

The Mirage Solo doesn't have any built-in speakers, so you are forced to use a pair of earbuds if you want to add an audio component to your VR experience. It comes with a pair of mediocre earbuds, but you can always substitute your own if you want higher fidelity audio. Aside from that, this headset is incredibly user-friendly, making it almost impossible to accidentally press a button and takes almost no time to get set up each time you want to use it.

Both of these headsets are ready to go as soon as you put them on in view of the sensors, once the initial installation has been completed. The models both lack buttons on the headset as well, meaning there is no chance of accidentally pressing one.

Next, after the trio of top scoring tethered headsets, the Google Cardboard, Google Daydream View, Gear VR, and the Merge VR all earned a 7 out of 10 for their user-friendliness. It is extremely easy to access the audio connector to plug in headphones when using the Gear VR, Cardboard, or Daydream, with it only being slightly more difficult with the Merge. However, it is a little easier to install your phone in the Merge VR than the pair of Google headsets or the Gear VR, only requiring you to slide your phone in from the top rather than folding out the front cover.

You can adjust the lens width on either side of the Merge  and use it as a button to interact with the display.
You can adjust the lens width on either side of the Merge, and use it as a button to interact with the display.

It is a little more work to set up the Gear VR each time. Instead of simply sliding your smartphone in, there are a pair of clamps that hold the phone in and a USB-C connector that you need to attach before you can use the VR system. However, we were big fans of the focal adjustment abilities of the Gear VR, which made it one of the easiest of the mobile headsets to get focused.

There isn't really an opportunity to inadvertently hit buttons on the phone the way it is supported, but there are a very limited number of phone cases that would work with this headset, meaning that you most likely need to remove the case from your phone before using the Gear VR.

We didn't experience any issues with a button on the phone being pressed accidentally on the other headsets during our testing process, but it would appear that this is much more likely with the Daydream due to the strap covering the volume buttons on the Pixel phone, than the Cardboard or the Merge.

The Daydream does give you the most flexibility for using your phone while it is still in its case, with the Cardboard being a little tighter than the Daydream and the Merge being even tighter.

The Star Wars: Jedi Challenges finished next in this metric, meriting a 6 out of 10 for its showing. The Star Wars headset requires to plug your phone in with one of the included cables and mounts in a plastic holder to install. However, you usually didn't have to remove your case, earning this product a few extra points.

Next, the VR SHINECON earned a 5 out of 10. It has integrated headphones, but it is an absolute pain to get your phone in the correct alignment whenever you want to use it and the locking mechanism doesn't fully engage unless you take your case off.

There are no markings to make sure your phone is a good position.
There are no markings to make sure your phone is a good position.

Rounding out the back of the group, the Canbor VR and the Bnext VR performed relatively poorly, earning a 3 and a 2 out of 10 for their efforts, respectively. It's not too much effort to get headphones plugged in when using the Canbor VR, but it is a solid hassle to get them hooked up when using the Bnext. It isn't great to get the Canbor set up for use. The cover folds out with clamps to hold the phone in place, but it can very easily push buttons accidentally depending on the phone. However, it is far superior to the Bnext. This headset has a holder that slides out, which then clamps in. This also makes it almost impossible to not accidentally hit buttons.

However, you usually don't have to take the case off of your phone to use these headsets. We tested with a larger, rugged case and it worked fine.

The Vive and its components. The sensors can be a pain to mount if you don't want to drill into your wall or have 2 tall tripods available.
The Vive and its components. The sensors can be a pain to mount if you don't want to drill into your wall or have 2 tall tripods available.

Ease of Setup


Finishing out our review, we compared the difficulty of the initial setup for each VR system. This metric accounts for the residual 10% of the overall score and is based on how much effort it took to set up the hardware for each system and install the software, as well as what the hardware requirements are to properly run each headset.


Claiming the top spot out of the entire group, the Lenovo earned a 10 out of 10 for being one of the easiest VR headsets to get set up, taking only a few minutes to get it going right out of the box. There isn't any additional hardware required to run this headset and the only hardware setup required is to plug in the optional earbuds and microSD card and you are all set. The software setup is similarly easy, only requiring you to connect to the wifi and pair the remote. Pairing the remote gave us a few issues, requiring us to try it a few times before we successfully got it to connect, but it still wasn't a huge hassle.

Coming in second place, the Oculus Go, Bnext, Canbor, SHINECON, Google Cardboard, and the Merge VR all earning a 9 out of 10 for their supremely easy initial setup.

In terms of hardware setup, the Google Cardboard, Bnext, SHINECON, and the Merge are essentially ready to go right out of the box. You need to adjust the lenses on the Bnext and Merge and that is about it. The Cardboard has no lens adjustment, so it is ready to go as soon as you pull it out of the box. The Canbor only requires you to add batteries to the remote and adjust the lenses and it is all set.

This model is ready to go out of the box.
This model is ready to go out of the box.

The Oculus Go is also ready to go right out of the box, only requiring you to add a wrist strap to the remote before you are ready to go.

The software setup on all of these headsets is a breeze, only requiring you to download whichever VR apps you want from the appropriate app store. These smartphone-based headsets are all compatible with an enormous range of smartphones, so most current phones should work without issue.

The Go is even easier to set up, allowing you to connect it directly to WiFi or set it up using a smartphone. You simply need to download the app on the phone, follow the directions, and pick your games before you are all set!

The Acer, Jedi Challenges, Google Daydream and the Samsung Gear VR ranked next, all earning an 8 out of 10 for their performance. The Daydream is ready to go right out of the box, while the Gear VR took a little more work, requiring you to put batteries in the remote and attach the head and remote strap. The software install for both of these headsets is a little more time-consuming, with the Gear VR leading you through a series of prompts to download a handful of apps. It wasn't hard, but it did take a little bit of time. The Daydream app gave us a little grief and kept crashing when we tried to enter a payment method and enable things, but eventually, it worked for us.

This pair of headsets do have somewhat limited compatibility, with the Gear VR only working with a handful of Samsung phones and the Daydream is limited to a small pool of Daydream compatible phones — pretty much the flagship phone models of a few manufacturers. You can see a full list on their website and they are adding new phones all the time, but if you haven't bought a top of the line smartphone relatively recently, you are most likely out of luck.

There isn't much setup required for this headset.
There isn't much setup required for this headset.

The Acer and the Jedi Challenges headset also only take minimal effort in terms of hardware setup. You only need to plug the Acer into the HDMI and USB ports on your computer to get it ready to go and install the batteries in the Star Wars headsets to get this pair ready to go. The software setup on the Star Wars is the same as the other mobile apps, only requiring a simple app install. The Acer is one of the easiest tethered models to get the software configured, with helpful prompts guiding you through the process.

Moving on to the remainder of the tethered headsets, the PlayStation VR is the easiest of the three to set up for the first time, earning a 7 out of 10. This model only took about 10 minutes to set up, requiring us to make sure the PlayStation camera was pointed in the correct direction and plug a handful of cable in. This model prompts you through the setup process and offers a quick tutorial on how to use it. This model does have limited compatibility, only working with a PS4 and a PlayStation Camera, while the PS Move controllers are necessary for some games.

The HTC Vive and the Vive Pro is by far the most difficult to set up of all the headsets we tested. The sensors need to be mounted on the wall or on top of two tripods. We also had to adjust significantly more settings than the PlayStation VR. All in all, this was a much more intensive setup process than the others and would probably be quite a struggle for users who aren't terribly tech-savvy.

Conclusion


Hopefully, this has been a helpful look at the top VR headsets available on the market today. While VR is an emerging technology, there are plenty of lower cost value options that would make a good introduction, or you can fully commit to a high-end tethered system for the maximum VR experience.


David Wise and Austin Palmer