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Logitech G933 Artemis Spectrum Review

This headset charges a premium for wireless capabilities and that is about it
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Price:   $200 List | $100 at Amazon
Pros:  Convenient and comfortable
Cons:  Pricey, lackluster sound quality
Manufacturer:   Logitech
By David Wise and Austin Palmer  ⋅  Aug 29, 2018
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61
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#7 of 11
  • Comfort - 40% 7
  • Audio - 30% 5
  • Microphone - 20% 5
  • Ease of Use - 10% 8

Our Verdict

Finishing in the lower half of the group, the G933 Artemis Spectrum by Logitech is far from being one of our preferred headsets. This wireless product is decently comfortable and quite convenient, but it falls flat in our other tests, with both sound and microphone quality that are lacking. On top of that, this headset has one of the highest price tags of the entire group, firmly cementing our lack of enthusiasm for it.


Compare to Similar Products

 
Awards  Editors' Choice Award  Best Buy Award Best Buy Award 
Price $200 List
$99.99 at Amazon
$170 List
$119.94 at Amazon
$100 List
$77.62 at Amazon
$100 List
$84.99 at Amazon
$50 List
$49.99 at Amazon
Overall Score Sort Icon
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Star Rating
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Pros Convenient and comfortableComfortable, great microphone and audio qualityExceptional sound quality, very comfortableIncredibly comfortable, great value, solid sound qualityInexpensive, exceptional microphone quality
Cons Pricey, lackluster sound qualityExpensive, doesn't block background noiseMicrophone quality is so-so, not as convenient to use as other productsHarder to mute, no mic sidetoneNot the most comfortable, sound quality could be bette
Bottom Line This headset charges a premium for wireless capabilities and that is about itIf you want the best of the best, the GAME ONE should be your number one choiceIf you love games with rich soundtracks and want the most immersive experience possible, the Kraken is the headset for youIf you are looking for an excellent, all-around gaming headset without breaking the bank, the Cloud II is a great choiceIf you are on a tight budget and want a solid gaming headset, the Cloud Stinger is a great choice
Rating Categories G933 Artemis Spectrum GAME ONE Kraken 7.1 V2 HyperX Cloud II HyperX Cloud Stinger
Comfort (40%)
10
0
7
10
0
7
10
0
8
10
0
8
10
0
6
Audio (30%)
10
0
5
10
0
8
10
0
9
10
0
7
10
0
7
Microphone (20%)
10
0
5
10
0
8
10
0
5
10
0
7
10
0
8
Ease Of Use (10%)
10
0
8
10
0
7
10
0
5
10
0
6
10
0
7
Specs G933 Artemis Spectrum GAME ONE Kraken 7.1 V2 HyperX Cloud II HyperX Cloud Stinger
Wired or Wireless Wireless Wired Wired Wired Wired
Measured cable length PC charging cable = 10 ft
3.5 mm = 5.2 ft
RCA = 3.5 ft
9.65 ft 6.7 ft 10.6 ft 10.5 ft
How to mute the mic Lift mic and button Lift mic Button on the mic Switch Lift mic

Our Analysis and Test Results

This headset tied with another wireless headset in our review, the Arctis 7 by SteelSeries and a wired headset from Kingston, the Cloud Revolver S. It is the most comfortable of these three, but has the worst sound and is the most expensive of this trio, costing about $50 more.

The Logitech G933 Artemis Spectrum.
The Logitech G933 Artemis Spectrum.

Performance Comparison


We ranked and scored these products by doing extensive research and analysis, then picking the candidates that had the most potential, then purchasing these and testing them side-by-side to see which headset is truly worthy of an award. The results of the Artemis Spectrum in our four weighted testing metrics — Comfort, Microphone, Audio, and Ease of Use — are shown below, each weighted proportionally to their overall significance.

The Artemis Spectrum has a lot of space in the ear cups; 2" x 3"
The Artemis Spectrum has a lot of space in the ear cups; 2" x 3"

Comfort


The Logitech got off to a good start in our testing process, earning a 7 out of 10 in our Comfort metric. This metric is worth 40% of the total score for each gaming headset, primarily based on a comfort questionnaire we had a large group of people fill out after each had worn the headset for a full day — or as long as they could stand it.

Pretty much everyone in our test group was fine wearing the Artemis for at least 7 hours, with a handful being totally fine for 10+ hours. The ear cups have relatively firm padding and are really large. The padding is covered in microfiber mesh, which provides a nice level of breathability, even when playing on warm days.

Most testers felt that the G933 was comfortable.
Most testers felt that the G933 was comfortable.

However, the headband — also covered in microfiber mesh — doesn't provide the most secure fit. This means there aren't any uncomfortable pressure points, but it will move about with very little effort — even falling off if you make too abrupt of a motion. It also is on the heftier side, weighing just shy of 13 ounces.

The G933 has a hide away mic.
The G933 has a hide away mic.

Audio


As mentioned above, we weren't thrilled with the audio qualities of the Spectrum, earning it a 5 out of 10. For this metric, we looked at both audio and voice, as well as how well the headset conveys position and how it did in a trio of benchmarking tests. Altogether, these tests are responsible for 30% of the overall score.

This headset isn't the greatest at listening to music, flattening out the rich musical scores on some of our favorite games to something almost impossible to listen to. The mid-range tones are so overemphasized that the bass and treble come across as incredibly weak — completely drowned out by any voice whatsoever.

The Spectrum was an average performer for our audio test.
The Spectrum was an average performer for our audio test.

The Spectrum doesn't do much better with voice, with voices losing much of their real-life quality when replayed through the headset, coming across extremely flat and hollow. This headset does about average at canceling out background noise, but actually does quite well when it comes to letting you identify the location of in-game sounds. Our testers were able to correctly locate the sounds of quiet footsteps, a gunshot, or an approaching vehicle about 90% of the time, doing especially well with the quieter sounds, like footsteps in a wooded area. It also did fairly well with our binaural benchmarking test, with the position of the knocks on the wooden door being conveyed relatively accurately.

The lights are cool on the G933  but unfortunately we don't get to see much of them due to the fact we are wearing them.
The lights are cool on the G933, but unfortunately we don't get to see much of them due to the fact we are wearing them.

Unfortunately, it didn't do all that well in the other two benchmarking tests. The bass was quite weak, with plenty of unwanted parasitic buzz and the drivers didn't appear to be totally synced up in the upper to mid-range frequencies.

The mic can neatly be folded into the ear cup.
The mic can neatly be folded into the ear cup.

Microphone


The Artemis Spectrum delivered another lackluster performance in our microphone quality test, earning a 5 out of 10 again. This metric is worth 20% of the total score and consists of judging how well it picked up your voice, as well as how well it filtered out external noises and side conversations.

The Artemis does a mediocre to decent job of picking up your voice, but it is a little fuzzy and doesn't quite replay your voice as close to real life as some of the other headsets do it. It is a little on the sibilant side with "S" or "Sh" sounds, but doesn't overdo it on "T"s or "P"s. It has a tiny amount of feedback and just always sounded a bit more distorted than we would have liked.

It did a little better at failing to pick up external noises, with our teammates failing to notice if we were typing on a mechanical keyboard, but definitely could tell if we were running a fan on high or eating while playing. Unfortunately, it also tended to pick up side conversations very well, transmitting understandable audio of the side conversations even when the conversation was 15 to 10 feet away.

Our favorite way to mute the mic was to lift it up; It is quick  easy  and effective.
Our favorite way to mute the mic was to lift it up; It is quick, easy, and effective.

Ease of Use


For the last set of tests, worth 10% of the total score, we looked at how much of a pain it is to actually use each of these headsets. The Artemis improved considerably, earning it an 8 out of 10 — its highest score in any of our metrics to date.

The Atremis Spectrum was really easy to use.
The Atremis Spectrum was really easy to use.

This headset can be used in both a wired and wireless configuration and has controls that are inline on the cord and on the headset itself, to suit whichever mode you are using it in. In addition to being able to mute the mic and control the volume, you also have three additional buttons that can be programmed for various functions, such as enabling or disabling surround sound or turning on a preset equalizer profile.

We did like that you can mute the mic either by lifting it all the way or pressing the mute button. The tip of the mic will also turn red when it is muted, but we did find that it was easy to inadvertently adjust the volume when muting the mic with the button, as it was right above the volume control dial.

You can set the "G" buttons up in the software to suit your needs.
You can set the "G" buttons up in the software to suit your needs.

The charging cable is plenty long at 10 feet, but the audio cables, if you want to run the Spectrum in wired mode, are a bit on the short side. We did really like that there is onboard storage in the headset itself for the wireless receiver to minimize the chance of you losing it.

The Artemis Spectrum has convenient built in storage for its wireless receiver.
The Artemis Spectrum has convenient built in storage for its wireless receiver.

The microphone isn't detachable, but there is the option to enable a sidetone if desired and adjust its volume.

Value


The Artemis Spectrum is a poor value option, having a relatively high price tag with a relatively unimpressive overall performance.

Conclusion


While the ability to operate both wired and wirelessly and conveniently store the wireless receiver are both handy features, they aren't enough to redeem the disappointingly mediocre audio and microphone quality of this product and its hefty price tag.


David Wise and Austin Palmer