The Best Projectors of 2017

Movie night lacking some snap? Presentations lacking some crackle? We popped 9 of the best projectors into our lab for 120 hours of side-by-side testing. We tested each model in a wide variety of situations, from projecting the tiny text of spreadsheets in brightly lit conference rooms, to watching high definition movies in blacked out home theaters. Whether you need your projector to make your quarterly earnings graph look impressive, or to help convince your significant other that Star Wars really is the best movie of all time, our testing results will lead you to the perfect light cannon.

Read the full review below ≫

Test Results and Ratings

Displaying 6 - 9 of 9 ≪ Previous | View All | Next ≫
Rank #6 #7 #8 #9
Product
Optoma HD142X
BenQ MS524A
ViewSonic PJD5155
Epson VS240
Awards      Best Buy Award   
Price $550 List
$549.99 at Amazon
$489 List$340 List
$318.55 at Amazon
$360 List
Overall Score 
100
0
59
100
0
57
100
0
47
100
0
47
Star Rating
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Pros Decent image quality, full HDRelatively inexpensive, very bright, portableBright lamp, inexpensiveBright lamp, portable
Cons Weak zoom, not very brightNot HD resolution, fuzzy text (but best of SVGA models)Loud fan, not HD, fuzzy textLoud fan, not HD, fuzzy text
Ratings by Category Optoma HD142X BenQ MS524A ViewSonic PJD5155 Epson VS240
Image Quality - 45%
10
0
6
10
0
4
10
0
4
10
0
3
Ease Of Use - 25%
10
0
6
10
0
6
10
0
5
10
0
6
Brightness - 15%
10
0
5
10
0
9
10
0
8
10
0
8
Fan Noise - 15%
10
0
6
10
0
7
10
0
3
10
0
4
Specs Optoma HD142X BenQ MS524A ViewSonic PJD5155 Epson VS240
Projection Technology DLP DLP DLP 3LCD
Advertised Brightness (ANSI Lumens) 3000 3200 3300 3000
Measured Brightness (Lumens) 1420 2742 2459 2581

Analysis and Award Winners


Review by:
Max Mutter and Steven Tata

Last Updated:
Tuesday
September 12, 2017

Share:
Updated September 2017
We spent the last month reviewing all the new projectors hitting the market, and nothing particularly noteworthy has caught our eye. Our current award winners are all still readily available at online retailers, and we still feel they are the best products you can get for less than $1000.

Speaking of that $1000 price cap, Optoma recently released the cheapest 4K projector available to date. At $2000 it is still far above the price range required for inclusion in our review, but if you're looking for the most performance per dollar, and want something with a more future proof resolution than the quickly obsoleting 1080p, it is well worth checking out.

Best Overall Home Cinema Projector


BenQ HT2050


Editors' Choice Award

$699.00
at Amazon
See It

Great image quality
Vibrant colors
Full HD
Dim lamp
Not ideal for well-lit rooms
If you're looking for the keystone to complete your home theater system, the BenQ HT2050 is the best choice. It combines great color nuance and vibrancy with a whisper quiet fan that was barely noticeable in our testing, even when the score got quiet and the camera zoomed in on the brooding hero. It also compliments the usual keystone corrections with a vertical lens shift, which allows you to move the picture up and down if you didn't manage to get your ceiling mount in the exact right position. The only slight downside is that its lamp, while brilliant in a home cinema setting, isn't quite bright enough to deal with a well lit room. If you're looking for a top notch presentation machine you'll want to check out the Epson EX9200.

Read full review: BenQ HT2050

Best Buy on a Tight Budget


ViewSonic PJD5155


Best Buy Award

$318.55
at Amazon
See It

Bright lamp
Inexpensive
Not HD resolution
Fuzzy text
Loud fan
The bad news is that you can't get a full HD projector for less than $500. The good news is that the $340 ViewSonic PJD5155 produces crisp images that look much better than you'd expect from its 800 x 600 resolution. It also has a bright lamp that can easily cut through ambient light, making it a great choice for presentations. Sure the slightly lower resolution might make small text look a bit fuzzy, but it's more than up to the task of powerpoint slides and graphs.

Read full review: ViewSonic PJD5155

Best Projector for Business Applications


Epson EX9200


Top Pick Award

$800
List Price
See It

Crystal clear text
Portable
Bright lamp
Full HD
Not the best cinematic image quality
With an incredibly bright lamp and sharp, 1080p resolution, the Epson EX9200 was the only model we tested that can overpower bright conference room lights to project vivid images, and make small text look perfectly crisp and legible. If your presentations are laden with the tiny text of spreadsheets or long strings of code, or you just want your slides to look as clear and vibrant as possible, this is the model for you. Plus, it comes with its own carrying case and weighs less than 6 pounds, so it can easily travel from conference room to conference room as you wow all your clients. It also works fairly well as a home theater machine, but the BenQ HT2050 is a much better option if you'll mostly be watching movies.

Read full review: Epson EX9200

select up to 5 products
Score Product Price Our Take
73
$800
Editors' Choice Award
Incredible image quality combined with a quiet fan make this the best option under $1000 for a home theater
65
$800
Top Pick Award
HD clarity and a bright lamp make this the best sub $1000 option for business presentations
63
$600
Combing good image quality and a reasonably quiet fan make this a good choice for home cinemas if you don't want to pay top dollar
63
$800
Vibrant images and a discreet fan make this great for home theater use, but the BenQ HT2050 is a bit better
61
$600
High quality images and an extremely bright fan make this great for presentations in well lit rooms, but the fan is quite loud
59
$550
Reasonable all around performer, but can get better image quality in the same price range
57
$489
Small, portable, and bright enough for when you need to take your presentation on the road, but small text is a bit fuzzy
47
$340
Best Buy Award
Great if you're on a tight budget and want to be able to project your presentations, and maybe even watch an occasional movie
47
$360
Very small and portable, but not as bright or crisp as other SVGA models in the same price range


Analysis and Test Results



How we Selected the Models we Tested


Projectors are available in a wide range of specifications and abilities. You can spend thousands on a 4K ultra high definition behemoth that will rival the quality of most cinema projectors, or get a pocket sized battery powered model that can turn just about anywhere into an outdoor movie theater. A review that covered the full range of projectors would rival War and Peace in length and, frankly, not be all that useful. So, to make things more simple, we narrowed down the selection of models we tested based on three stipulations:
  • Greater than 1000 lumens brightness
  • Readily available online for less than $1000 (list price and 'street' price often differ greatly)

This selection left us with models that were both bright enough for business presentations and crisp and agile enough to satisfy cinephiles and gamers.

Our overall scores are based on 11 different test that we conducted in our lab. We projected images from all the models we tested onto the same screen, sometimes two at a time, sometimes four at a time, in varying light conditions to determine which ones were the brightest, had the best image quality, were the easiest to use, and had the quietest fans. The following sections provide the nitty gritty details of those test results.

Our quad projection image quality testing setup. Here the BenQ provides the most detail in the bright area of the image  while the other models wash out the white clouds to varying degrees. Note: the Optoma HD26 has been replaced with the new HD27  which provides better image quality. However  both models tend to add a red tint to images.
Our quad projection image quality testing setup. Here the BenQ provides the most detail in the bright area of the image, while the other models wash out the white clouds to varying degrees. Note: the Optoma HD26 has been replaced with the new HD27, which provides better image quality. However, both models tend to add a red tint to images.

Image Quality


Image quality is mostly the domain of cinephiles. While powerpoint presentations will see some improvement with better image quality, especially if they contain high resolution images, the cinematic experience is where you'll really notice sharper resolution and more vibrant colors. Before we began our testing we watched a number of movies and scrolled through numerous HD photos to determine where different models struggled to produce stellar images. The biggest problem areas we discovered were movies that looked washed out, color accuracy in high resolution photos, overall resolution, and odd skin tones (we can confirm that Matt Damon is much less attractive when it looks like he has a full body sunburn).


We compared all the models' performance in these areas side by side. We used a dark room for movies, but viewed images both in dark and well lit rooms in order to simulate a photo slideshow or a business presentation with photos. Most of the models have endless options to adjust colors and contrast and brightness. In our testing we focused on the preset viewing modes (ie cinema, bright, vivid…) that most people are more likely to use.

A red color wheel. Here you can see that the Optoma HD27 adds a strong red tint to the image. The HD142X does as well  but to a slightly lesser extent. The Epson Home Cinema  2040 provides the truest colors of the three models shown here (we know it's the red planet  but its not that red).
A red color wheel. Here you can see that the Optoma HD27 adds a strong red tint to the image. The HD142X does as well, but to a slightly lesser extent. The Epson Home Cinema 2040 provides the truest colors of the three models shown here (we know it's the red planet, but its not that red).

We wouldn't say that any of the models we tested has particularly poor image quality, but there is a very noticeable difference between the top scorers and the low scorers. The Editors' Choice Award winning BenQ HT2050 picked up the top score of 8 out of 10. It had the darkest, most true blacks, which made all of the other colors pop. Even in lighter scenes colors looked rich and vibrant, and skin tones always looked accurate and natural. It was also able to provide the best definition in bright scenes without washing out any details. Ambient light did tend to wash out colors a bit, but the BenQ HT2050 is definitely our favorite model for viewing in a dark room. Also earning the top score of 8 was the Epson Powerlite Home Cinema 2040. In our testing it matched the BenQ HT2050 in terms of color vibrancy, but tended to wash out dark scenes just a bit more. It is much brighter than the BenQ HT2050 and fared much better when projecting in bright rooms, but still wouldn't be our top pick for presentations.

Here the reddish hue of the Optoma HD26 is apparent (the HD26 has now been replaced with the superior HD27  but the new model still has issues with red tints). The BenQ HT2050 provides the deepest and richest colors in this scene  and is also able to retain the most detail of the clouds and mountain in the very bright background.
Here the reddish hue of the Optoma HD26 is apparent (the HD26 has now been replaced with the superior HD27, but the new model still has issues with red tints). The BenQ HT2050 provides the deepest and richest colors in this scene, and is also able to retain the most detail of the clouds and mountain in the very bright background.

Just behind the top scorers were the ViewSonic PJD7720HD, the Epson EX9200, and the Optoma HD27. The ViewSonic PJD7720HD was able to match the BenQ 2050 in terms of color vibrancy, but its blacks were just not quite as true. This took just a bit of punch out of darker scenes, particularly those with a galactic backdrop. Also, in lighter scenes looked just a tad more washed out and a bit less vivid. While these slight drawbacks are apparent in a side by side comparison, in isolation the ViewSonic PJD7720HD produced impressive images, and we doubt any home theater owner would be disappointed with its image quality. The Epson EX9200 performed similarly to the ViewSonic PJD7720HD, but its colors were a bit less vibrant. Both of these models are plenty bright enough to project high quality images in a well lit room, but the EX9200 projects much clearer text and would be our hands down recommendation if you're looking for a powerpoint presentation machine. The Optoma HD27 was about even with the ViewSonic PJD7720HD in terms of color quality, but struggled with producing legible text in bright rooms.

In our testing the Epson EX9200 was the most adept at producing clear  legible text  even at small fonts.
In our testing the Epson EX9200 was the most adept at producing clear, legible text, even at small fonts.

Outside of the top three scorers in our image quality test we began to see some small issues that were not only noticeable in side by side comparisons, but in isolation as well. The Optoma HD142X, which scored a 6 out of 10, had good contrast and sharp resolution, and did well keeping bright scenes looking vivid and not washed out. However, it often lent an overly reddish hue to scenes. Many landscapes had a red tint to them, and skin tones took on a blushing quality. This was more apparent with lighter skin tones, but was noticeable in darker skin tones as well.

Here one can see the overly red skin tones rendered by the Optoma Models (npth of these models have been updated  but their successors share the same issue). The BenQ produces the most accurate skin tones. The Epson comes close to the BenQ  but makes the faces look slightly washed out.
Here one can see the overly red skin tones rendered by the Optoma Models (npth of these models have been updated, but their successors share the same issue). The BenQ produces the most accurate skin tones. The Epson comes close to the BenQ, but makes the faces look slightly washed out.

The low scorers in our image quality test were the three more inexpensive models we tested. All of these models use the SVGA resolution of 800 x 600. While this resolution produces decent images, it just can't compare to high definition. Additionally, the 4:3 aspect ration means that widescreen movies can't take advantage of the full projected area. While this lack of resolution took these models out of the running for the top spot, they did perform well in other areas. The BenQ MS524A and the ViewSonic PJD5155, both of which scored a 4, were able to render more accurate skin tones than the Optoma models. The ViewSonic in particular had very accurate skin tones. The Best Buy Award winning BenQ MS524A had an impressive contrast ratio that made colors pop, but those colors were somewhat less accurate than the more expensive models. It also handled bright scenes better than the other models in this range. Bright, indoor scenes looked crisp and accurate on the BenQ while the other two models lent a bluish tint to the same scenes. The Epson VS240 received the low score of 3. It performed similarly to the other models in this range, but had slightly more reddish skin tones and somewhat duller colors. If you want a big screen and are on a budget, one of these SVGA models can provide an acceptable image. However, if you really want to bring the cinema experience to your home, you're going to have to spend a bit more for a 1080p model.

The BenQ has the best colors of the SVGA models. The other two add a blueish tint to bright  indoor scenes. The drop off in resolution between 1080p and SVGA models is very noticeable.
The BenQ has the best colors of the SVGA models. The other two add a blueish tint to bright, indoor scenes. The drop off in resolution between 1080p and SVGA models is very noticeable.

Ease of Use


If you're planning to use a projector solely for home theater purposes you'll probably set it up once and then never touch it again. In this case ease of use really boils down to the quality of the remote control interface.


If you'll constantly be bringing it to different houses for the big game, or moving it from conference room to conference room, then ease of setup becomes significant. Setup consists of aiming, usually by adjusting the length of the legs at the front of the unit, zooming and focusing the image, and adjusting for keystoning. Keystoning is the common phenomenon of images appearing trapezoidal due to the lens not being perfectly parallel to the screen. All of the models we tested could perform vertical keystoning correction, and some could correct for horizontal keystoning as well. Our testing procedure involved setting up and breaking down each model a multitude of times, so we're very familiar with the each model's various setup attributes and annoyances.



All the models we tested provide a similar user experience in regards to setup and control interface, with some subtle differences that make some slightly more preferable than others. Accordingly all of our ease of use scores were tightly packed together, ranging only from 5 to 7 out of 10. The top scorer was the Editors' Choice Award winning BenQ HT2050. Its remote had far and away the most intuitive interface. It was easy to switch between color modes and inputs. The buttons also have a red backlight that makes it easy to find the button in a dark room, but doesn't make you feel like a coal miner suddenly emerging into bright sunshine. The included vertical keystone correction and large zoom are both easy to use and make getting the image square and the correct size a breeze. It is the only model we tested that included vertical lens shift, which is a huge plus when installing a permanent mount in a home theater. The only downside of the HT2050 is its size. It is relatively bulky and heavy, and is the least portable

Front legs that adjust with small threaded screws (left) take a lot of turning to adjust. Large threaded screws (middle) are much faster. Legs that adjust via a button and latch mechanism (right) are the fastest and easiest to use  but the preset heights mean you do sacrifice some adjustability.
Front legs that adjust with small threaded screws (left) take a lot of turning to adjust. Large threaded screws (middle) are much faster. Legs that adjust via a button and latch mechanism (right) are the fastest and easiest to use, but the preset heights mean you do sacrifice some adjustability.


Six of the models we tested picked up the average score of 6 in our ease of use testing. These models had varying drawbacks that made them slightly more difficult to use than the top scorer. The shared remote of the Optoma HD142X and the Optoma HD27 was fairly easy to use, but its buttons were back lit so brightly that it lent a deer in the headlights feeling when used in a dark room. The Epson Powerlite Home Cinema 2040 and the Epson VS240 also share the same remote. This was our least favorite remote. We felt its button layout was counterintuitive, and the buttons were fairly small and hard to press. Both models somewhat made up for this by offering both horizontal keystone correction, and an automatic vertical keystone correction. The BenQ MS524A couldn't quite live up to its bigger sibling. Its remote lacked the friendly red backlight and had very small, hard to read text. The Epson EX9200 is very portable, but also has small buttoned, slightly frustrating remote. We also found it hard to use its wireless connectivity, but we didn't knock it too much for that because it is the only model we tested to offer such a feature.

All of the remote controls we tested gave similar designs  but some are more pleasant to use than others.
All of the remote controls we tested gave similar designs, but some are more pleasant to use than others.

Both of the ViewSonic models we tested, the PJD7720HD and the PJD5155, received the low score of 5. Both shared the same remote that was relatively straightforward and easy to use. Both also had easy to use vertical keystone adjustments. Where they lost points was in the leg design. All the models we tested have three legs, one in the front center and two in the back corners. The front leg is always adjustable to control the tilt of the unit. The two ViewSonics are the only models we tested that had non-adjustable back legs. This may seem like an unimportant detail, but adjustable rear legs can be quite useful. They allow you to make corrections if the unit is sitting on a surface that is not perfectly level, and can get you just a little extra height if you need to bump the image up a tad. This lack of adjustability is what dropped the ViewSonics to the bottom score in our ease of use testing. The BenQ MS524A also lacks adjustable rear feet, but scored slightly higher due to its portable size and shape.

The three SVGA models we tested. Epson and BenQ both opt for smaller  more portable bodies for their SVGA offerings while ViewSonic retains the large body of its higher end models.
The three SVGA models we tested. Epson and BenQ both opt for smaller, more portable bodies for their SVGA offerings while ViewSonic retains the large body of its higher end models.

Brightness


In the world of projectors brighter is generally better. You can always make an overly bright image softer, but if a lamp's full capacity produces an image that is too pale it can't be made brighter. Top end brightness usually isn't an issue in a dark home cinema setting. In fact, most models have a cinema mode that dims the lamp in order to provide truer blacks and thus more vivid colors. Top end brightness becomes significant when projecting in well lit rooms, the most common scenario being a business presentation in a conference room. In this situation you want to be sure text and graphs are crisp, easy to read, and not washed out. To do this the lamp must be bright enough to ward off the miscreant photons of ambient light that like to bounce around rooms at random, fading colors and washing out text. Accordingly, most of our brightness testing involved viewing excel sheet and powerpoint presentations in a bright room. We also measured brightness using a lux meter, and compared our measurements to the manufacturer claims. Across the board the brightness we measured was lower than the manufacturer claim, particularly in the Optoma models. For the exact brightnesses we measured see the specifications table at the top of this page.


Brightness is one metric where the more inexpensive SVGA models reigned supreme. Of the four models that received high scores in our brightness test, three of them were SVGA. The two top scorers, the ViewSonic PJD7720HD and the BenQ MS524A, both received a score of 9, and both were measured at around 2700 lumens in our testing. Both projected graphs and spreadsheets with bright white backgrounds and clearly delineated text and colors. They Were also able to project photos that did not appear washed out from the ambient light in the room. One step down were the Epson VS240 and the ViewSonic PJD5155, both of which scored an 8. These models were just slightly dimmer than the top scorers, measuring in the 2500 lumen range. However, they were able to project sharp, bright graphs and text in our well lit testing room. The only reason they didn't both receive 9's as well was their programming. Most of the time slides with white backgrounds were rendered as bright and white, But, on occasion, a slide would pop up that was rendered as oddly red or green, and then the next slide would be fine. This inconsistency in rendering white dropped them out of the top spot. All of these models are bright enough to make colors look sharp and accurate in a lit room, though the lower resolution of the SVGA models can make text look a bit fuzzy. If you want to project high quality images in a bright room the increased resolution of the 1080p ViewSonic PJD7720HD is a noticeable improvement.

The ViewSonic PJD7720HS (bottom right) was able to produce the most accurate colors and retain the most natural skin tones when dealing with the ambient light of a well lit rooms. The other models produced skin tones that either looked washed out or overly red. Note: The Optoma HD26 has been updated  but the new HD27 has similar issues.
The ViewSonic PJD7720HS (bottom right) was able to produce the most accurate colors and retain the most natural skin tones when dealing with the ambient light of a well lit rooms. The other models produced skin tones that either looked washed out or overly red. Note: The Optoma HD26 has been updated, but the new HD27 has similar issues.

The Epson EX9200 was the only model that scored a 7 out of 10 in our brightness testing. We measured its lamp brightness at around 2200 lumens, a good bit dimmer than both the top scoring models and its claim of 3200 lumens. However, we gave it a relatively high score due to its real world performance. In our experience it consistently produced bright white backgrounds for text heavy slides, even in well lit rooms.


After the top scorers there is a steep dropoff to the bottom group in this metric, all of which scored 4 out of 10 in our brightness testing. We measured all of these models to be in the 1100 to 2000 lumen range. This makes them great for home theater use, but less than ideal for using in a room with a lot of ambient light. We measured both the Optoma HD142X and the Optoma HD27 at just about 1300 lumens, which was well below the manufacturer claims of 3200 and 3000 lumens, respectively. Ambient light exacerbated the red tint the Optoma's lend to images, leaving most skin tones looking unnaturally red. They also struggled to overcome ambient light during normal powerpoint presentations, lending a blue tint to white areas and making text and graphs look dull and washed out. The BenQ HT2050 and the Epson Powerlite Home Cinema 2040 had similar issues, but to a greater degree. These products left white areas looking very blue, and text and graphs looking quite faded. While these dimmer models have some noticeable color distortion when used in a bright room, none of them look terrible. We've used the dimmest model, the BenQ HT2050, in our office meetings and found it passable.

We measured the brightness of both Optoma models as far below their manufacturer claims. Despite this  they were still brighter than some of the other home theater oriented models  and were thus able to produce brighter whites in a well lit room.
We measured the brightness of both Optoma models as far below their manufacturer claims. Despite this, they were still brighter than some of the other home theater oriented models, and were thus able to produce brighter whites in a well lit room.

Fan Noise


The bulbs required to create such vivid images produce heat. A lot of heat. Borderline cook an egg heat. A cooling fan is essential to keep this heat at bay, but it can also become a metaphorical buzzing mosquito that won't go away. If the whir of the fan is noticeable every time a movie gets quiet it can pull you out of the immersive experience you're looking to create. Perhaps more importantly, an audible drone can pull clients out of the flow of your presentation, meaning you won't close the deal and will never be able to afford that Ferrari. To test this we let all of the projectors get really hot and then assigned scores based on the most annoying volume achieved, and how often they reached that volume.


The fan noise test produced the widest spread of scores in any metric, ranging from 2 to 9. The Editors' Choice Award winning BenQ HT2050 was the clear winner, picking up the top score of 9. Its fan quietly purred along like an inconspicuous cat. Even when we pushed the lamp to get as hot as possible the fan noise remained docile. The next highest scoring model was the other BenQ we tested, the BenQ MS524A, which scored a 7. Its basal level of fan noise was as quiet as its older brother's, but it did get noticeably louder a couple of times when the bulb got really hot.

Most models fell into the mid range of our fan noise testing, scoring between 4 and 6. While these models had subtle differences in fan noise, in general they were all loud enough to be noticed occasionally, but not loud enough to be particularly grating. Most people won't be bothered by the fans on these models. However, if you're especially sensitive to noise and refuse to sleep at your grandparents' place because the ticking of the grandfather clock keeps you up all night, you'll want to opt for one of the higher scoring models. . Both Optoma models scored 6 out of 10, with fans that generally weren't noticeable except during exceptionally bright scenes or during extended use. The Epson EX9200 scored a 5. It was generally quiet, but you could hear the fan ramp up after it had been projecting bright images for 20-30 minutes. The Epson VS240 and the Epson 2040 were both a bit noisier than the EX9200 on average. Both earned scores of 4.

Bright lamps can produce a lot of heat  requiring an internal fan to regulate temperature.
Bright lamps can produce a lot of heat, requiring an internal fan to regulate temperature.

The worst performers in our fan noise testing were the two ViewSonic models. Both of these products have fans that are actually quite quiet when you first turn them on. However, if you project a bright image for more than a few minutes the fans ramp up to high speed, producing a very noticeable and distracting whir. The ViewSonic PJD7720HD was slightly worse than the ViewSonic PJD5155 in this regard. This is why we awarded them scores of 2 and 3, respectively. Both models would certainly be distracting during a presentation, which is a shame because both have high brightness levels that would be perfect for such an application. They also tended to pull us out of our movie induced stupor whenever the scenes became bright and/or quiet. Watching Boba Fett fall into the sarlacc pit is much less satisfying when it's accompanied by an incessant hum.

A Note on Input Lag


Input lag is the amount of time between a signal being generated and the result being projected on the screen. This doesn't matter for movie viewing, but can be critical for video games. If Mario doesn't jump when you tell him to, then Princess Peach will never be rescued. We measured input lag using a dedicated meter and found very small differences between models. To determine if these differences were functionally significant we brought a bunch of avid gamers into our testing room and had them play their favorite games. Nobody was able to notice a difference between any of the models we tested. So those interested in gaming don't need to worry about input lag.

Testing input lag by playing video games side by side. None of our resident gamers were able to discern a difference between any of the models.
Testing input lag by playing video games side by side. None of our resident gamers were able to discern a difference between any of the models.

A Note on 3D Quality


Although home theater 3D technology has not taken off in the way the industry originally anticipated, all but one of the models we tested, the Epson VS240, are 3D capable. We went into our testing expecting to see big differences in 3D quality, mostly because 3D modes don't allow you to adjust settings to get the best color quality. However, instead of producing a wide spread of color qualities, that limitation almost completely equalized them. Additionally, each model handled 3D images almost identically. We didn't see any appreciable difference between 3D scenes on the various models we tested.

Conclusion


Projectors are complex products with long lists of specifications and thick user manuals. However, by boiling their essence down to a few key performance attributes, it is possible to make clear, side by side comparisons. We hope our testing results have guided you to your ideal model.
Max Mutter and Steven Tata

  • Share this article:

Still not sure? Take a look at our buying advice article for more info.
 

Follow Us

Unbiased.

You Might Also Like