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Best Forks

Let us help you choose the right tool for the job.
Credit: Maggie Brandenburg
By Maggie Brandenburg ⋅ Review Editor  ⋅  Nov 27, 2020
Our Editors independently research, test, and rate the best products. We only make money if you purchase a product through our links, and we never accept free products from manufacturers. Learn more
Hunting for utensils to replace or expand your selection? We researched scores of the best forks to snag these top 10 for side-by-side testing. Spending inordinate amounts of time "forking around," we learned which options are great steak stabbers and which are ideal rice deliverers. We weighed them, measured them, and identified their balance points. From breakfasts to dinners and sausages to side dishes, we put every competitor to the test, scooping, cutting, skewering along the way. We ran them through dishwashers and did our best to bend every handle and tine. No matter if you're looking for an everyday tool or an innovative option to obsess over, we've found an ideal pairing for your life and your kitchen.

1

Best Overall Dinner Fork


Briout Premium Stainless Steel Forks


Briout Premium Stainless Steel Forks
Editors' Choice Award
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$11.59
(11% off)
at Amazon
See It

Weight: 42 grams | Total Length: 8.1"
Good balance and stability
Very useful size and shape
Comfortable weight
No nickel can result in lower shine
Few other options available

Without a doubt, the Briout Premium is our favorite dinner option and a great utensil for everyday use. It's thick enough and heavy enough to feel comfortable and be durable. It's long enough for eating salad without being too long for enjoying a brownie. A round, wide handle provides excellent balance and great stability against your hand, whether you're stabbing or scooping. Nearly 2 inch long tines work well for piercing grilled meats without leaving gaps so wide that smaller grains slide through too easily. It does a solid job cutting things with its sturdy edge and is polished enough to look good and feel great while still providing the grip you need.

The downsides to this comfortable, useful utensil are few. Briout has very limited other options, both in design for this model or other types that could create a comprehensive set. It's probably a touch large for growing children but pretty ideal for just about any adult. It's made of 18/0 stainless steel, meaning it contains no nickel. While this does mean it's missing out on some corrosion-resistance and extra luster, it's also great news for the growing number of people diagnosed with nickel allergies. If you're hunting for the Swiss army knife of forks, we love this one.

Usable Handle Length: 5.3"
Tine Length: 1.9"
Material: 18/0 stainless steel

Number in Tested Set: 12

This set from Briout Premium combines everything we want in an...
This set from Briout Premium combines everything we want in an everyday utensil - functionality, comfortable grip, durability, and a simple design that goes with everything.
Credit: Maggie Brandenburg

2

Best Bang for Your Buck


Hiware Good Stainless Steel Dinner Forks


Hiware Good Stainless Steel Dinner Forks
Best Buy Award
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$11.99
(14% off)
at Amazon
See It

Weight: 41 grams | Total Length: 8.0"
Very easy to use
Reassuring weight and balance
Many matching options
Outer tines slightly wider
Could be better at cutting

The Hiware Good Dinner set brings much to love to the table, and at a unit cost that's very reasonable. Though it may look like so many others, this utensil fits in your hand like it's meant to be there. It's a reasonable and comforting weight that provides great balance when held in just about any way you'd use a fork. It's easy to grip and handily does whatever you need it to, from shoveling to skewering. It looks classy enough for guests and is sturdy enough for everyday use. Hiware also sells a plethora of matching silverware to make your perfect set.

We had a difficult time finding things we dislike about this set. It could be a bit better at cutting through tough foods but isn't bad at it. Its outside tines are slightly thicker than the interior ones, which may not be the ideal aesthetic for you, but it's fairly subtle. In general, we're fans of this very straightforward utensil that will easily become something you never notice or think about — in a good way, because that means it's doing its job.

Usable Handle Length: 5.2"
Tine Length: 1.8"
Materials: 18/8 stainless steel

Number in Tested Set: 12

The Hiware Good Dinner is an easy-to-use utensil that gets the job...
The Hiware Good Dinner is an easy-to-use utensil that gets the job done.
Credit: Maggie Brandenburg

3

Unusual Shape That's Exceptionally Useful


Elegant Life Japan Stainless Steel Forks


Elegant Life Japan Stainless Steel Forks
Top Pick Award
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$15.99
(11% off)
at Amazon
See It

Weight: 43 grams | Total Length: 8.1"
Great usability
Durable and solid
Many options for creating a set
Unique aesthetic may not be for everyone
Middle tines bend a bit too easily

At first glance, we were uncertain how much we'd like the Elegant Life Japan model. Its squared end is narrower than the many rounded options we tested, and its tines bow outward in a way that almost resembles a spoon. Yet once we started using it, we quickly discovered how much we love the functionality of this unique-looking design. It cuts through even thick sausage casings with impressive ease and has no problems impaling any food we tried. But where it shows up the rest of the competitors in this review is when it comes to scooping power. If you like to eat a lot of rice, quinoa, or other small-grained foods, this is the best non-spoon utensil we've tested for consistently commuting little morsels to your mouth.

The Elegant Life has a rather distinctive design that just might not be to your taste or match your chosen silverware pattern. While the outside tines are exceptionally wide, helping to load and hold food more easily, the middle two tines are the opposite. They're actually a bit too thin and can be bent fairly easily with moderate pressure. Of course, you can also bend them back, but still. If you're down for the looks of this funky fork (that might actually be, like, 5% spoon), we absolutely loved using it for eating all our meals.

Usable Handle Length: 5.2"
Tine Length: 1.75"
Material: "Extra-fine stainless steel" (not specified)

Number in Tested Set: 12

Though it has a slightly non-traditional shape, the Elegant Life...
Though it has a slightly non-traditional shape, the Elegant Life Japan proved itself to be extremely versatile, functional, and pleasant to use.
Credit: Maggie Brandenburg

4

Great for Everyday Use


MCIRCO Heavy-Duty Stainless Steel Forks


MCIRCO Heavy-Duty Stainless Steel Forks
Top Pick Award
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$9.99
at Amazon
See It

Weight: 37 grams | Total Length: 8.1"
Long and elegant-looking
Good balance and grip
Sharp tines for easy stabbing
A bit narrow for loading
Very limited selection

The MCIRCO Heavy-Duty is a long-handled tool with a narrower-than-average array of tines. Without detracting too much from its functionality, this slightly narrower build adds a touch of refinement to otherwise simple silverware. In all other respects, it's pleasant to use. It's well-balanced and strikes a happy medium between being heavy enough to have confidence in its durability but light enough that you don't feel outclassed eating macaroni in your pajamas. A wide, round end and just enough of an edge on the sides adds stability to your grip without being too sharp.

Of course, that narrower width does detract some from how easy it is to load up with a mouthful of goodness, allowing food to fall off the side a bit more easily than wider options. And if you're all about the options, you have an extremely limited selection to work with here. But if you're after a touch of sophistication in your everyday meals, the MCIRCO Heavy-Duty is a solid choice for your home.

Usable Handle Length: 5.25"
Tine Length: 1.9"
Material: 18/10 stainless steel

Number in Tested Set: 8

The MCIRCO Heavy-Duty is long and graceful and just right for...
The MCIRCO Heavy-Duty is long and graceful and just right for everyday use.
Credit: Maggie Brandenburg

5

Best for Hosting Dinner Parties


Oneida Chateau Fine Flatware


Oneida Chateau Fine Flatware
Top Pick Award
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$26.31
at Amazon
See It

Weight: 36 grams | Total Length: 7.2"
Sharp tines and great usability
Shockingly sturdy for its thickness
Tons of types and designs available
Rather expensive
On the small side

Searching for a classy fork that looks great, works well, and is built to last? The Oneida Chateau may just be the answer to your silverware prayers. Though on the small side of utensils in this review, the Chateau proves to be a fine-tined, useful option that slices and perforates with ease. It's thin and delicate-looking, but this 18/10 stainless steel beauty is shockingly sturdy and unflappable in the face of our attempts to disfigure it. Though we didn't test it for decades, we easily found numerous testimonials online from folks claiming their Oneida flatware has lasted that long and more. The ornate patterning on the end is fine enough for even the most discerning of dinner guests, and Oneida sells a vast range of possible patterns, sizes, and types of silverware to expand your collection.

With its narrow tines, the Oneida Chateau is better designed for foods that require cutting and stabbing. The wide gaps left between those puncturing spikes are large enough to let smaller bits of food slip through, abandoned on the plate. The Chateau is also a bit small for our taste, though it adds to the piece's quiet dignity (and Oneida does sell larger models). At the end of the day, this is a set of silverware that's as useful as it is classic.

Usable Handle Length: 4.6"
Tine Length: 1.9"
Material: 18/10 stainless steel

Number in Tested Set: 4

It's hard to beat the elegant look and feel of timeless Oneida...
It's hard to beat the elegant look and feel of timeless Oneida Flatware.
Credit: Maggie Brandenburg

6

Best Plastic Utensil Replacement


Tramontina Pro Line Commercial Grade Forks


Tramontina Pro Line Commercial Grade Forks
Top Pick Award
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$15.95
(36% off)
at Amazon
See It

Weight: 22 grams | Total Length: 7.0"
Works well
Fairly stable considering thin construction
Inexpensive and available in high quantities
Not refined and rather small
Less durable

Do you need large quantities of silverware that don't have to be amazing as long as they function? Try the Tramontina Pro Line. These lightweight utensils are an inexpensive per unit option that work surprisingly well. Just the right amount of curvature in the handle provides a sturdy grip and stops it from bending during normal usage. It's small without being tiny and has narrow tines that are above-average at cutting and piercing food.

That said, these are relatively unrefined, with less polished-smooth edges and an overly simplistic look that's exceptionally casual. Though they didn't bend during the extended eating segment of our testing, they are bendable by hand, with enough force. We best describe them as the silverware you'd expect to receive in a low-budget cafeteria — totally functional, but not particularly attractive. But if you're ready to ditch using plastic silverware every time your friends come over for a barbeque, the Tramontina Pro Line is a great replacement.

Usable Handle Length: 4.5"
Tine Length: 1.75"
Material: "Restaurant grade steel" (not specified)

Number in Tested Set: 36

Though small, thin, and very lightweight, the Tramontina Pro Line is...
Though small, thin, and very lightweight, the Tramontina Pro Line is a useful option that's sold in large quantities that make it a great choice for swearing off plastic utensils when you host parties.
Credit: Maggie Brandenburg

7

Long Handled and Nimble


MUTNITT Stainless Steel Dinner Forks


MUTNITT Stainless Steel Dinner Forks
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$15.99
(6% off)
at Amazon
See It

Weight: 37 grams | Total Length: 8.1"
Good middle-ground size and shape
Usable and comfortable
Just average
Limited options

The MUTNITT Dinner set is one of several very similar-looking models we tested. This long-handled option is lighter than several others, though, and has a narrower head, adding a splash of good-looks to its everyday aesthetic. Unlike many others, all four tines are the same width and shape, which looks pleasantly symmetrical. Its slightly-less-curved handle isn't quite as nice as some others but is still fairly comfortable, providing good balance and a stable foundation.

Yet, the MUTNITT Dinner fork fails to stand out from the crowd in any way. It's just "okay" at cutting, "fine" at stabbing, and "decent" at scooping. Not that that's a bad thing, as it still held its own among some stiff competition. Those outside tines that aren't any wider than their inside brethren also flex more than average during normal use. And if you like options, MUTNITT doesn't have many. But all in all, it's a good quality piece that's easy to use.

Usable Handle Length: 5.3"
Tine Length: 1.7"
Material: 18/10 stainless steel

Number in Tested Set: 16

The MUTNITT Dinner boasts a long handle on a narrow shape and is...
The MUTNITT Dinner boasts a long handle on a narrow shape and is quite nimble.
Credit: Maggie Brandenburg

8

Oversized But Still Great


AmazonBasics Stainless Steel Forks


AmazonBasics Stainless Steel Forks
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$12.98
at Amazon
See It

Weight: 61 grams | Total Length: 8.2"
Exceptionally sturdy
Large but still very useful
Heavy and large
No nickel makes for a dull shine

If you're hard on your belongings, the super sturdy AmazonBasics silverware may be just what you need. This utensil is both thick and heavy and impressively denied all our efforts to bend it with our hands — the only one to completely do so! A narrowed end to its elongated set of tines makes this oversized tool still easy to eat off of. Its robust appearance looks great in hand and adds confidence in its longevity.

On the other hand, this fork is actually very big, and a full set will take up a significant amount of space in your silverware drawer. It's far and away the heaviest model we tested, which could be a bit much, depending on your personal preference. It's also one of just a few we tested that totally lacks nickel, providing a duller shine and coming with a "wash within 2 hours of use" warning due to decreased corrosion resistance. Still, we find a lot to love about this big, friendly fork and think it's a solid choice for fans of large silverware.

Usable Handle Length: 5.2"
Tine Length: 1.9"
Material: 18/0 stainless steel

Number in Tested Set: 12

This hefty tool from AmazonBasics is large but still quite pleasant...
This hefty tool from AmazonBasics is large but still quite pleasant to use.
Credit: Maggie Brandenburg

9

Solid Everyday Option


Hiware Extra Fine Dinner Forks Set


Hiware Extra Fine Dinner Forks Set
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$11.99
(20% off)
at Amazon
See It

Weight: 42 grams | Total Length: 7.9"
Attractive design
Plenty of matching options available
A bit off-balance and tine-heavy
Unimpressive cutting performance

With a modern, squared end design, the Hiware Extra Fine Dinner set provides an upscale appearance on a pretty useful utensil. It's the only model we tested with tapering at the base of each space between tines, adding to its unique aesthetic. It's about average length and weight for its class with a shiny, mirrored finish. It adequately performs all required fork functions and is available in packages of different numbers. Hiware also offers other sizes and types of silverware to complete your set.

Lacking a rounded handle to balance out its long tines, the Hiware Extra Fine is a bit more tine-heavy than most of its competitors. Not in a way that's bothersome during eating, but it is noticeable during our side-by-side comparisons. It's also a touch more flexible than some others — including the outer tines, which may contribute to its lackluster cutting performance. All in all, it's still a pretty good everyday choice and may just have the matching options to make it worthwhile for you.

Usable Handle Length: 4.9"
Tine Length: 1.9"
Material: 18/8 stainless steel

Number in Tested Set: 12

The Hiware Extra Fine Dinner has a squared modern handle and tapered...
The Hiware Extra Fine Dinner has a squared modern handle and tapered bases between each tine.
Credit: Maggie Brandenburg

10

Budget-Friendly Bulk Choice


Winco Windsor Dinner Fork Set


Winco Windsor Dinner Fork Set
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$7.77
at Amazon
See It

Weight: 24 grams | Total Length: 7.1"
Very inexpensive
Available in bulk
Very easy to bend during use
Lacks finishing details

If saving money is your bottom line, you may look to the Winco Windsor to fill your needs. Per unit, it's the least expensive model we tested, which is readily reflected in its design. It fully functions as a fork, albeit a tad short. Relatively unpolished sides retain a sharper edge for cutting, and wide tines offer a sold platform for loading with your dinner. It's also one of the lightest models we tested that's still made of stainless steel.

The most obvious flaw with the Winco Windsor is how easy it is bent. Simply cutting through a particularly tough meal or aggressively pinning down a dish while you slice it with a knife is enough to deform this flat, lifeless utensil. Though we tested a range of durability in this review, the Winco is by far the easiest to bend. But if you want a step up from the plastic flatware of old, this one will do the trick while saving you some cash.

Usable Handle Length: 4.4"
Tine Length: 1.7"
Material: 18/0 stainless steel

Number in Tested Set: 12

The Winco Windsor is lightweight and comes in large quantities at...
The Winco Windsor is lightweight and comes in large quantities at budget-friendly prices.
Credit: Maggie Brandenburg

Why You Should Trust Us


This review is lead by Senior Review Editor, Maggie Brandenburg and her team of hungry humans. As a woman who's been working from home for years, Maggie spends her days chowing through her workload and collecting discarded utensils from her desk at the end of each day. She has a background in conducting scientific research, which she brings to her scrutiny of every product and the development of rigorous testing methods. Maggie is aided in her evaluation of silverware by her equally hungry partner and a smattering of visiting friends. She has been testing home goods and outdoor gear for GearLab since 2017.

When it comes to testing flatware, we're not "forking around" — or perhaps, in this case, we are. We put each piece under the metaphorical microscope, measuring dimensions, investigating shapes, and checking balance points. We challenged every contender to cut through thick sausage casing, scoop cooked rice, and spear steamed vegetables. They all were subjected to hand scrubbing and dishwasher cleansing, and we bent (or tried to bend) every handle and tine, just to see if we could. Though they may all look the same at first, we found a plethora of differences that allow us to pinpoint where each one does well or falls short.

Weighing contenders.
Making notes during our side-by-side comparisons.
Testing during breakfast.

Analysis and Test Results


In order to methodically evaluate every piece of flatware, we tested them all across four mutually exclusive metrics, carefully constructed to probe into different aspects of their performance. We then combined the test results from Weight and Balance, Usability, Stability, and Design to create a comprehensive portrayal of their individual performances. What follows is a breakdown of each metric, delving into what utensils do best and exactly where they shine brightest or fall short.

Direct comparisons let us do the hard work so you don't have to...
Direct comparisons let us do the hard work so you don't have to. From left to right: Tramontina Pro Line, Winco Windsor, Oneida Chateau, MUTNITT Dinner, MCIRCO Heavy-Duty, Elegant Life Japan, Hiware Dinner, Hiware Extra Fine, Briout Premium, AmazonBasics.
Credit: Maggie Brandenburg

Weight and Balance


We began testing this metric by measuring the obvious. We weighed every piece and compared that to how they feel in hand. We checked where balance points fall and how that translates into where they rest on the edges of our hands and fit into our palms. We noted if they feel tine-heavy or have clunky handles, and we considered how their heaviness or lightness contributes to the overall experience of using each contender.

What's up with the numbers in front of "stainless steel"?

Rather than being a single type of metal, stainless steel is a combination of many elements, including iron (around 50%), nickel, chromium, and many others in small amounts. There are different grades for various uses from mechanics to kitchenware, but to be considered stainless steel, it must have at least 10.5% chromium. This is because chromium binds readily to oxygen, creating a barrier on the surface of the metal that prevents rust from forming. In North America, stainless steel kitchenware is typically prefaced with numbers like 18/0, 18/8, or 18/10. These numbers refer to the percentages of chromium and nickel (respectively) present in the stainless steel they're made of.

Chromium is important to note, as it is key in rust prevention, as mentioned above. Nickel adds a bit of durability, some corrosion resistance — specifically when up against acidic materials (like lime juice) — and a touch of extra luster in that mirror-like finish. For the frequency of use in your home, all three of these compositions are more than adequate. Unless you're a connoisseur of fine flatware or have them all lined up next to one another, you're unlikely to notice much of a difference between the looks and feel of these minute differences.

In general, forks that feel better in hand offer wider handle ends that counterbalance the heavy tines you're eating with. Regardless of the utensil's individual weight, these wider handles — no matter their length — consistently make the biggest difference. Having the right amount of curvature also helps. A handle that's too flat feels more imbalanced than an appropriately S-curved model, even if the two are the same length and weight.

The Briout Premium has a wide handle that helps it achieve...
The Briout Premium has a wide handle that helps it achieve comfortable balance no matter how you use it.
Credit: Maggie Brandenburg

At the top of the pack is the Hiware Good Dinner silverware. It has an exceptionally comfortable handle curve paired with a wide base that together provides exceptional balance no matter how you're using it. This model, above all others, seems to almost disappear in hand, becoming a natural extension of your arm. The Briout Premium and MCIRCO both also have similar combinations of wide bases and comfortable curves that give them great balance to their medium weights.

The Hiware Good Dinner fork is very comfortable in hand. It's...
The Hiware Good Dinner fork is very comfortable in hand. It's well-balanced and has ideal curvature, making it very natural and effortless to use.
Credit: Maggie Brandenburg

Also notable are some less-expected options. The AmazonBasics is the heaviest piece we tested, but with its weight cleverly distributed through a very wide handle base and fairly narrow tines, is surprisingly comfortable in hand. The Elegant Life Japan utilizes a cleverly-shaped, thinner head to stay pretty well-balanced despite lacking the wide handle end employed by most of its competitors. The super-lightweight Tramontina Pro Line is worth mentioning, not only because of its shockingly minuscule weight but also because it manages to feel comfortably balanced in-hand even with its low-budget, narrow design.

Giving up plastic silverware for your backyard barbeques? Good for...
Giving up plastic silverware for your backyard barbeques? Good for you! The Tramontina Pro Line is an easy replacement that's simple but inexpensive, easy to use, and comes in bulk quantities.
Credit: Maggie Brandenburg

Usability


Evaluating usability involves a lot of stabbing, slicing, cutting, scooping, and generally, a lot of eating. We compared thicknesses, widths, spaces between tines, angles, and curves. We judged how pleasant they are at doing all the things a good fork should do, from loading up grains of cooked rice to separating a slice of soft meat. We also cleaned them repeatedly, by hand and in the dishwasher, to see how well they withstand the full range of daily use.

Caring for Your Flatware
Stainless steel is a fairly ideal material for silverware, as the metals that make it also provide resistance to rust and corrosion. However, they're not rustproof. The best way to ensure the longevity of your flatware is by making sure it remains smooth over the years. That may involve sanding or buffing scratches or edges. By creating a smooth external surface, the chromium in your steel can more easily do its job, binding oxygen to create a smooth barrier that can repel rust for years to come.

Though it's not something we often dwell on, most of us use forks for almost every meal, requiring them to be adept at a huge range of actions, from stabbing to cutting off pieces to scooping. Skewering things is fairly straightforward with just about every four-tined utensil, but we observed a wide range among models we tested in their ability to slice through challenging food (like thick sausage casings) and scoop up cuisine comprised of small pieces (like rice). Those with slightly sharper edges and outer tines that are resistant to flexing are the easiest to cut with. The Briout Premium and Elegant Life Japan both fit this description. The Oneida Chateau cuts very well and is also exceptionally adept at piercing pieces of even the toughest meat with its narrow, sharp tines.

Comparing the business end of every contender. Clockwise from top:...
Comparing the business end of every contender. Clockwise from top: Tramontina Pro Line, Elegant Life Japan, MUTNITT Dinner, MCIRCO Heavy-Duty, Briout Premium, Hiware Good Dinner, Hiware Extra Fine Dinner, AmazonBasics, Oneida Chateau, Winco Windsor.
Credit: Maggie Brandenburg

Minimizing the space between tines obviously allows fewer foods to fall through the cracks. However, particularly long and narrow tine beds are more challenging to load food onto, often letting it fall off the all-too-close sides in the short distance from your plate to your mouth. Both Hiware pieces we tested, the Good Dinner and Extra Fine, offer a pretty good platform for food. The Winco Windsor also has wide tines with small spaces in between, though it's a fairly small utensil overall. But the one that leaves all the rest in the dust is the Elegant Life Japan, with an almost spoon-like concavity to its tine bed, very wide outer tines, and perfect spacing between. When it comes to sheer functionality, this fork proves its worth at every turn, scooping rice with ease and slicing through sausages with simplicity.

The Elegant Life Japan takes home the gold medal in usability, with...
The Elegant Life Japan takes home the gold medal in usability, with its excellent cutting edge and superb scoopability (we're pretty sure it's at least part spoon!).
Credit: Maggie Brandenburg

Stability


To grade stability, we considered a number of different factors. We looked up the metal composition of each contender — when we could find it. We took note of how well they stay in hand while performing all the other necessary actions of consuming food. We also did our best to bend handles, spread tines, and otherwise deform each model, just to see how hard they are — or aren't.

The oversized AmazonBasics is designed in a way that makes it still...
The oversized AmazonBasics is designed in a way that makes it still very useful, while its added weight and thickness feel nearly indestructible in hand.
Credit: Maggie Brandenburg

When it comes to resisting the stresses of frantic eating, the AmazonBasics is the sturdiest design we tested. Even when we tried to bend its handle with fair force, we couldn't do it. The middle tines, the weakest part of nearly every fork, only have the slightest flex to them when pressed, which is no wonder, considering how thick this entire piece is. In contrast, the Oneida Chateau looks delicate and thin but is remarkably difficult to deform. The Briout Premium and MUTNITT Dinner are also above-average in their strength in the face of force. Truly, nearly every one we tested is pretty sturdy, with the exception of the thin, flat, easily-bent Winco Windsor, whose appeal lies in its price rather than its performance.

The MUTNITT Dinner is one of a handful we tested with an obvious...
The MUTNITT Dinner is one of a handful we tested with an obvious indentation on the back of the handle, adding stability when flipped over.
Credit: Maggie Brandenburg

In hand, wider handles provide better stability in any orientation you may be called upon to use your silverware. Most models we tested have wide handle ends for exactly this reason — and they work remarkably well. When flipped over to stab your lunch, it's helpful for a fork to have a slight indent on the back of the narrow part of the neck, in which to stabilize your index finger. The Briout Premium and MUTNITT Dinner both have very usable concave spaces that help with this. The Tramonitina Pro Line has a much more pronounced indentation running the entire length of the back of the handle, providing some much-needed stability to this small utensil. The best design, however, can be seen in the Oneida Chateau, which employs two rounded ridges running down each side of the back of the handle, creating a very obvious groove that easily cradles your finger exactly where you need it to be while you pierce your vittles.

The back of the Oneida Chateau has parallel ridges like side rails...
The back of the Oneida Chateau has parallel ridges like side rails, offering excellent grip and stability in hand.
Credit: Maggie Brandenburg

Design


Comparing each contenders' design includes subjective evaluations of their aesthetic appeal with actual measurements and considerations of symmetry and balance in style. We noted proportions and ratios while considering patterns, finishes, and their overall appearances. We also researched other options offered by each manufacturer to create harmonious sets or facilitate matching other silverware you may already own.

It's hard to fault the elegance and style of the Oneida Chateau...
It's hard to fault the elegance and style of the Oneida Chateau. Even if this exact design isn't your cup of tea, Oneida makes a wide variety of excellent options.
Credit: Maggie Brandenburg

Much of the aesthetics of each contender can be best judged by the many photos included in this article. And yet, some stand out from the rest with their classic style or elegant appeal. The Oneida Chateau is a delicate yet hardy fork that is as useful as it is beautiful. The craftsmanship of this set is far above any other we tested, and Oneida makes a huge variety of handle designs for whatever you fancy. Also notable are the long, narrow figures of the MCIRCO Heavy-Duty and MUTNITT Dinner. The weighty AmazonBasics also features clean-cut lines and a soft shine that our reviewers appreciate.

Though they may all seem the same, we've put that to the test to see...
Though they may all seem the same, we've put that to the test to see exactly where they're different.
Credit: Maggie Brandenburg

Conclusion


At first glance, it's not unreasonable to wonder what possible differences there could be between such similar-looking flatware. However, our methodical testing and systematic scrutinizing revealed a host of differences in their comfort and utility. No matter what you like to eat or how you want to do it, there's a perfect fork for your life and your wallet.

Maggie Brandenburg