How We Tested Juicers

By:
David Wise and Austin Palmer

Last Updated:
Wednesday
November 8, 2017

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How do we determine which juicer is truly the best? After thoroughly researching and comparing over 50 models, we bought the latest and greatest models to test side-by-side and find out which one truly rules them all. We spent over 60 hours testing these products, conducting over 15 different tests to judge and score the performance of each product. We split our testing process into five different metrics, each weighted based on their significance to the overall score. These metrics are Juice Quality, Hard Produce, Soft Produce, Leafy Greens, and Cleaning, with the exact testing and scoring procedures for each set of tests outlined below. For more information on what to look for when buying a new juicer or on juicing in general, take a look at our comprehensive juicer Buying Advice article, or for more information on how specific products performed, check out our comprehensive head-to-head juicer review.

Juice Quality is the most important metric of our review.
Juice Quality is the most important metric of our review.

Juice Quality


Our first and foremost metric, Juice Quality, is the most important one of our entire testing process and takes credit for 25% of the total score. Producing high-quality, freshly-squeezed juice is the primary reason that you would even get one of these products in the first place, easily cementing this metric's position as the most important. To test this, we selected three juice recipes to use as challenges for each juicer.

For being such an inexpensive model  the Hamilton Beach had relatively good juice quality.
For being such an inexpensive model, the Hamilton Beach had relatively good juice quality.

The first recipe that we tested with was a beet juice concoction that included apples, beets, carrots, celery, cucumber, and ginger root. We then judged the texture, taste, and thickness of each drink to determine scores. For evaluating the texture, we essentially looked at how much pulp made it into the juice, whether the drink was smooth or chunky. We had a panel taste the drink and award points based on their preferences, then aggregated the results. For thickness, we again had a panel taste each drink, looking for the perfect balance between a watery blend and a high-viscosity blend that more closely resembled a smoothie.

The longer your juice sits the more oxidation occurs  slowly removing the benefits of your freshly made juice.
The longer your juice sits the more oxidation occurs, slowly removing the benefits of your freshly made juice.

Our second test was with a Romaine, Apple, and Orange juice recipe. This recipe consisted of Granny Smith apples, celery, cucumber, romaine lettuce, and peeled oranges. We again had our panel rate the taste, texture, and thickness of each drink, similar to beet juice.

The Hamilton Beach had a watery  average tasting "Sunset Blend".
The Hamilton Beach had a watery, average tasting "Sunset Blend".

Our final test for this metric was a recipe called "Sunset Blend" that consisted of apple, beets, carrots, orange, and sweet potatoes. We judged this third mixture the same as the first, with each of these three juices contributing equally to the overall score.

The Breville Juice Fountain Elite is one of the best at juicing soft produce.
The Breville Juice Fountain Elite is one of the best at juicing soft produce.

Soft Produce


Our next metric, Soft Produce, assessed the yield when juicing soft produce, as well as some basic quality assessments, for each juicer. This metric accounts for 20% of the total score and is based on a quartet of tests.

For the first two tests of this metric, we used cucumbers and apples as sample soft produce. We weighed the produce before and the juice after to determine yield, as well as noting the amount of pulp in the juice, the foam, color, rate of separation and temperature. We were looking for low pulp, little to no foam, a color that was representative of what was being juiced, whether or not the juice rapidly separated, and juice that had not been heated up excessively.

The Omega did a great job at juicing soft produce.
The Omega did a great job at juicing soft produce.

We conducted the same set of tests for both celery and oranges, judging each juicer on the same standards.

The Omega  like most masticating juicers  struggled a little with harder fruits and veggies.
The Omega, like most masticating juicers, struggled a little with harder fruits and veggies.

Hard Produce


Similar to our Soft Produce metric, our Hard Produce metric also accounts for 20% of the total score. We used a trio of tests to rank and score each product, finding some stark differences when it came to performance.

First, we looked at juicing carrots. We weighed the produce before and then weighed the finished product to score the percentage yield, as well as judging the amount of pulp, foam, and the rate of separation of the finished product, just like the Soft Produce metric.

Carrots were quickly juiced in our centrifugal juicers.
Carrots were quickly juiced in our centrifugal juicers.

We did the exact same test with both beets and sweet potatoes.

Juicing leafy greens is one of the harder tasks for most juicers  but the Hamilton Beach does it with ease.
Juicing leafy greens is one of the harder tasks for most juicers, but the Hamilton Beach does it with ease.

Leafy Greens


Establishing a trend, our Leafy Greens metric is again responsible for 20% of the total score. Similar to Hard Produce, we again used three different tests to determine the score for each product.

To start off, we calculated the juice yield for each appliance with spinach. Again, we also noted if the juice separated quickly, the color, if there was an excess of foam produced, and the amount of pulp in the finished product.

Juicing leafy greens is one of the harder tasks for these products  with the masticating model having a clear edge over the centrifugal ones.
Juicing leafy greens is one of the harder tasks for these products, with the masticating model having a clear edge over the centrifugal ones.

We again repeated the same assessment with curly-leaf kale and wheatgrass.

You can't use a dishwasher to clean the various parts of the Omega  but it is so easy to clean by hand that you won't even want to.
You can't use a dishwasher to clean the various parts of the Omega, but it is so easy to clean by hand that you won't even want to.

Cleaning


For our final metric, we evaluated how much work it took to clean out each product at the conclusion of your juicing. While this metric only accounts for the remaining 15% of the score, the difficulty in cleaning each product can make or break your juicing experience.

After all of the previous tests, we had cleaned each juicer many times and used that experience to score each product for this metric. We individually scored the difficulty in cleaning the discs (if applicable!), the filter, food pusher, lid, strainer bowl, pulp container, and the juice cup, as well as rating the relative effectiveness of the included cleaning tool.

All of the Hamilton Beach's components laid out  with the majority requiring cleaning after you juice.
All of the Hamilton Beach's components laid out, with the majority requiring cleaning after you juice.

We also noted if there were any components that are dishwasher safe.

Conclusion


Hopefully, you have found this article to be illuminating and better understand what we did to test each of these kitchen appliances. For the results of how each product did, take a look at the comprehensive review here!

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