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KIMO 20V 13809S Review

If you are looking for a budget drill to get you started on some entry level DIY projects, then this is a good option
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Price:   $80 List | $67 at Amazon
Pros:  Inexpensive, includes basic bits and drills
Cons:  Not very powerful, struggles to drive in larger fasteners
Manufacturer:   Kimo
By Austin Palmer and David Wise  ⋅  Jun 29, 2020
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43
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#14 of 18
  • Drilling - 35% 4
  • Driving - 35% 3
  • Included Battery - 20% 6
  • Convenience - 10% 6

Our Verdict

If you are looking for bare-bones cordless drill on a budget and only have light-duty projects in mind, then you should consider the KIMO 20V Drill. This entry-level tool doesn't have close to the drilling and driving power of the premium models but it's more than enough to hang a picture or knock out some basic DIY projects over the weekend. It's fairly convenient and easy to use, even including a set of drills and bits to get you started. If you are looking to spend as little as possible on a new drill, then the KIMO could be the right choice.

Compare to Similar Products

Our Analysis and Test Results

The KIMO includes a flexible attachment so you can tighten or loosen fasteners in confined or other hard-to-reach places where the body of the drill is too large — a bit of a unique feature. However, these can break if you apply too much force through them and make it much easier to strip out fasteners, so you only want to use it whenever absolutely necessary.

Performance Comparison


This drill is a decent bargain option for entry-level projects.
This drill is a decent bargain option for entry-level projects.

Drilling


Our first round of assessments focused on how well each of these cordless tools held up when it came to drilling holes. We rated and scored performance by seeing how well each drill did at drilling a 1" hole using a spade bit through some stacked lumber, ¼" and ½" holes through 16 gauge steel sheets, and a 5" hole using a hole saw through a solid-core door. Regrettably, the KIMO couldn't really hang with the top tools, earning a score well below average.


The KIMO actually got off to a decent start in our steel sheet drilling tests. It was quick and easy to drill both sizes of holes once we dropped it down to the lower gear — it kept stalling when we tried in the higher gear. It only took about 1.5 seconds to punch through the steel sheet with the ¼" drill and around 10 seconds with the ½" drill.

This drill had more than enough power to make it through the metal sheets in our test.
This drill had more than enough power to make it through the metal sheets in our test.

Unfortunately, the KIMO did considerably worse with both the hole saw and the paddle bit. It didn't make any progress with the hole saw in its higher gear but we eventually were able to drill about ¾ of the depth with some persuasion. It frequently stalled and struggled the whole time, taking 2+ minutes to reach this depth. For comparison, the most powerful drills made it the full depth in under 20 seconds.

Unfortunately  the KIMO struggled and stalled frequently with this large hole saw.
Unfortunately, the KIMO struggled and stalled frequently with this large hole saw.

This drill did a little better with the 1" spade bit but not by much. We again had to shift to the lower gear but it could successfully drill through the stacked lumber, though much slower than the top tools.

This drill usually made it through with the 1" spade bit without too much fuss  only stalling right as it punched through.
This drill usually made it through with the 1" spade bit without too much fuss, only stalling right as it punched through.

It would stall on a semi-frequent basis, especially when punching through the bottom of the hole. Overall, we think this drill is fine for the occasional heavy-duty application but we would suggest investing in a more powerful option if you routinely are using large paddle bits or hole saws.

The KIMO usually could drive in smaller screws easily enough.
The KIMO usually could drive in smaller screws easily enough.

Driving


Next, we moved on to ranking and scoring how the KIMO did at driving in fasteners, using a ½" diameter, 5" long lag bolt and some more typical wood screws. The KIMO did a little bit better overall in this metric but still merited a score that was well below average compared to the top tools.


The KIMO delivered very poor results in our lag screw test, failing to even come close to driving the screw to the full depth. It stopped with just over 2" of the screw remaining.

This drill failed to drive in the lag screw to its full depth.
This drill failed to drive in the lag screw to its full depth.

This drill did much better with the smaller screws, as long as you weren't trying to drive them in where there was a knot. It's slow and steady when it comes to driving in the screws but can usually get the job done.

The KIMO countersunk most of the heads flush without complaint.
The KIMO countersunk most of the heads flush without complaint.

The KIMO could countersink the heads to the proper depth most of the time, though it would struggle while doing so.

This drill delivered respectable results in our battery test.
This drill delivered respectable results in our battery test.

Included Battery


Our next series of evaluations focused on the battery performance of each of these cordless tools, based on the number of batteries included, the time to recharge a completely dead battery, and the performance of each tool in our battery test. This test consisted of driving in 16 screws and then drilling 3 1" holes with the spade bit, repeating this cycle until each drill's battery was depleted. The KIMO did much better, earning an above average score overall.


The KIMO only includes a single 2.0 amp-hour battery which took around 75 minutes to fully recharge in our test — right on par for the average product.

We drilled 20 of these 1" holes on a single charge  along with driving in 112 screws.
We drilled 20 of these 1" holes on a single charge, along with driving in 112 screws.

This drill delivered a solid showing in our battery test before calling it quits. It made it through 6 complete cycles and then died just a single 1" hole shy of completing the 7th. The top tools finished over 10 cycles before their batteries were exhausted.

This drill's belt clip and lower weight make it easy to carry around.
This drill's belt clip and lower weight make it easy to carry around.

Convenience


Our last round of tests looked at the ease of use and user-friendliness of each tool. We awarded points based on things like the maximum bit diameter and operating modes, as well as the weight and ease of installing or removing the battery. The KIMO finished out with another decent performance, earning another above average overall score.


This drill is fairly lightweight, tipping the scales at just under 3 pounds, and has a belt clip near its battery pack. It can hold a bit up to ⅜" in diameter — which is a little on the smaller side — and it has two different operating modes if you need to maximize speed or torque.

This drill has plenty of convenience features  like an adjustable clutch and a battery fuel indicator.
This drill has plenty of convenience features, like an adjustable clutch and a battery fuel indicator.

We liked that the battery slides in and out very smoothly and that it has a fuel gauge with LED lights but we weren't overly enamored with the integrated worklight. It's a little on the dim side and there isn't any way to activate the light without the drill spinning.

Value


All in all, the KIMO is a solid tool for its price point. There are definitely much better options out there but we think it's a decent value if you are shopping on a very restricted budget.

Conclusion


This light-duty cordless drill is a great option for beginners or homeowners that are looking for a basic tool that does an acceptable job without spending a ton of cash. It's by no means the most powerful tool out there but it can handle most beginner to intermediate DIY projects without a fuss and includes enough bits and drills to get you started. It's a good option on a tight budget but we would recommend upgrading if you have more ambitious uses in mind.

Austin Palmer and David Wise