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Oster Total Prep 10-Cup Review

A well-priced 10 cup model with a lower-powered motor that yields varied results
Oster Total Prep 10-Cup
Credit: Oster
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Price:   $50 List | $40.63 at Amazon
Pros:  Excellent price, good for slicing tomatoes
Cons:  Generally inconsistent performance, leaves un-chopped pieces, subpar mixing capabilities
Manufacturer:   Oster
By Hayley Thomas ⋅ Review Editor  ⋅  Aug 30, 2021
Our Editors independently research, test, and rate the best products. We only make money if you purchase a product through our links, and we never accept free products from manufacturers. Learn more
47
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#9 of 10
  • Chopping - 20% 4
  • Mixing - 20% 3
  • Pureeing - 20% 6
  • Shredding - 15% 5
  • Slicing - 15% 5
  • Cleaning - 10% 6

Our Verdict

The Oster 10 Cup is a lower-priced food processor, with a performance that matches its price point. Our testing yielded inconsistent results, and large chunks remained when chopping, pureeing, and shredding. Mixing seems to work the motor harder than it wants to be worked and therefore does not create a homogenous sauce; slicing yields tapered slivers of varying thicknesses. That being said, we were pleasantly surprised at its ability to gently slice a tomato without mushing it. Overall, this model is best for those who care more about the price than the performance.

Compare to Similar Products

 
Awards  Best Buy Award Best Buy Award Best Buy Award  
Price $50 List
$40.63 at Amazon
$250 List
$249.99 at Amazon
$100 List
$89.99 at Amazon
$45 List$40 List
$32.49 at Amazon
Overall Score Sort Icon
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46
Star Rating
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Pros Excellent price, good for slicing tomatoesGreat at pureeing and slicingGreat for shredding, slicing, good at choppingGreat at pureeing, good at chopping, inexpensiveInexpensive, better than average at mixing
Cons Generally inconsistent performance, leaves un-chopped pieces, subpar mixing capabilitiesNo adjustability of shredding or slicingLittle more difficult to cleanLeaky, not the best at mixing, loudShreds and slices poorly, loud
Bottom Line A well-priced 10 cup model with a lower-powered motor that yields varied resultsOne of the best food processors you can get on a budget without sacrificing too much performanceOffering all-around excellent performance given its price tag, this is one of our favorites to anyone shopping for a bargain buyFor those trying to save some dough, this inexpensive model will get the job done, especially when it comes to pureeing and choppingA small model that is the least expensive and lowest scoring of the group
Rating Categories Oster Total Prep 10... Cuisinart Custom 14 Ninja Professional Hamilton Beach 10-Cup Black+Decker 8-Cup
Chopping (20%)
4.0
6.0
6.0
7.0
5.0
Mixing (20%)
3.0
6.0
6.0
5.0
6.0
Pureeing (20%)
6.0
8.0
7.0
8.0
4.0
Shredding (15%)
5.0
6.0
7.0
6.0
3.0
Slicing (15%)
5.0
7.0
7.0
5.0
4.0
Cleaning (10%)
6.0
6.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
Specs Oster Total Prep 10... Cuisinart Custom 14 Ninja Professional Hamilton Beach 10-Cup Black+Decker 8-Cup
Model # FPSTFP1355-NP DFP-14BCNY BN600/BN601 70730 FP1600B
Bowl Size 10 cup 14 cup 9 cup 10 cup 8 cup
Dimensions W: 8.2"
H: 16.1"
D: 9.3"
W: 7.75"
H: 15"
D: 10.75"
W: 9.9"
H: 15.6"
D: 7.3"
W: 10.5"
H: 15.5"
D: 8.5"
W: 7.5"
H: 15.3"
D: 10.7"
Measured Weight of Base 3 pounds, 6 ounces 12 pounds, 6 ounces 4 pounds, 8 ounces 3 pounds, 1 ounce 3 pounds, 2 ounces
BPA Free Yes Yes Yes Yes No
Motor 500 Watt 720 Watt 850 Watt 450 Watt 450 Watt
Speed Control (Slice/Shred)/(Mix/Knead)/(Chop/Pulse)/Off On/(Pulse/Off) Chop/Puree/Dough/Disc/Low/High/Pulse High/Low/Pulse/Off On/(Pulse/Off)
Cord Storage Internal None External Cord Wrap Internal Underside Cord Wrap
Feet Suction Cups Smooth Rubber Suction Cups Suction Cups Suction Cups
Decibels at 3ft 92.3 61.5 80 96 95
Mini Bowl Blade N/A Yes N/A N/A N/A
Accessory Storage Case No No No No No
Slicing Disc Non adjustable Non adjustable Non adjustable Non adjustable Non adjustable
Shredding Disc Non adjustable Medium Non adjustable Medium Medium
Dough Blade Yes No Yes No No
Whipping Attatchment No No No No No
Citrus Juicer No No No No No
Dicing Kit No No No No No
Build in Bowl Scraper No No No Yes No
French Fry Disc No No No No No
Julienne Disc No No No No No

Our Analysis and Test Results

Performance Comparison


A budget friendly food processor with budget like performance.
A budget friendly food processor with budget like performance.
Credit: Laura Casner

Chopping


During our hands-on testing, we chopped onions, carrots, and nuts. The Oster 10 Cup starts up quickly and chops most items with some mass to them but struggles with looser, lighter foods — like flour. Generally speaking, this device does not yield a particularly even chop across the board.

Chopping up onions in this model yields inconsistent results.
Chopping up onions in this model yields inconsistent results.
Credit: Austin Palmer

We put two small onions in the Oster, and the bowl felt somewhat crowded. It successfully chopped a majority of the onions but seemed to leave an undesirable amount of larger, un-chopped pieces. We continued pulsing to try to break down the larger pieces, but that only minced and mushed the smaller bits whilst leaving, the larger ones crowd-surfing on top.

We had a similar experience with carrots. We were left with a variety of differently sized pieces, and the more we tried to break down the larger chunks, the smaller the previously chopped bits got. The heartier carrot was left less mushy than the soft watery onions, but the lack of consistency was disappointing.

Heartier foods like carrots chopped nicely, but again, lack...
Heartier foods like carrots chopped nicely, but again, lack consistency.
Credit: Austin Palmer

The nuts seemed to chop a little more evenly than the onions and carrots. That being said, there was a lot of dust and a small handful of completely whole almonds. Overall the Oster leaves a lot to be desired in the chopping department. If you are looking for an even chop rather than a hodgepodge of minced and untouched pieces, then the Oster may not be the right choice for you.

Surprisingly the Oster chopped our almonds quite nicely, but it...
Surprisingly the Oster chopped our almonds quite nicely, but it created a lot of dust and left a few whole.
Credit: Austin Palmer

Mixing


For this test, we tried making mayonnaise and pizza crust from scratch. The Oster 10 Cup struggled with this test. We thought it was going to vibrate right off the counter with how much it was shaking, and the noise was a little off-putting. It was clear that the motor was struggling.

The Oster struggles with mixing.
The Oster struggles with mixing.
Credit: Laura Casner

During our mayonnaise making, the ingredients simply would not combine. Adding an excessive amount of oil was the only way to achieve a harmonious mixture, but the recipe did not call for as much oil as the Oster 10 Cup required. Making pizza crust was almost as hopeless. Butter chunks would not mix in fully, and a large amount of flour remained pressed to the bowl's bottom, sides, and top. Generally speaking, we were underwhelmed with the Oster's mixing capabilities.

The motor sounded like it was struggling when we made pizza crust.
The motor sounded like it was struggling when we made pizza crust.
Credit: Laura Casner

Pureeing


Next up, we performed our pureeing test. We made hummus, nut butter, tomato sauce, and applesauce. A lot of our purees were left feeling a little grainy or coarse in texture, and the pieces of food that flung to the top and sides remained whole.

Our nut butter was a little grainy, but overall came out smooth and...
Our nut butter was a little grainy, but overall came out smooth and tasty.
Credit: Austin Palmer

The nut butter took roughly eight minutes it the Oster and yielded a surprisingly creamy final product. There was a fair amount of splatter on the walls, and it was still somewhat grainy and textured compared to the more expensive options in our test suite, but overall enjoyable.

Here you can see that some of the gritty nut bits stuck to the outer...
Here you can see that some of the gritty nut bits stuck to the outer walls on the bowl
Credit: Austin Palmer

The tomato sauce took about 30 seconds. The tomatoes blended up nicely, but we found that our garlic was left rather chunky. While we don't mind delicious garlic chunks in our spaghetti sauce, it is worth noting that blending it for longer did not yield a smoother result.

The applesauce had a similar inconsistency to it, as everything that flung out onto the sides and top remained completely un-pureed. That being said, it took just under a minute to make decent applesauce, so we would consider that a win for the Oster 10 Cup

We also tested the spillage rate by filling the food processor to the maximum fill line with water and mock-blending. There is no rubber seal, so water does spritz out a bit, especially when filled right up to the max fill line, but we were surprised at how little water escaped. If you are pureeing something particularly liquidy, it is best to stay below the max fill line.

Shredding


Many food processors offer multiple shredding options, but the Oster only offers one. It performed okay in this metric testing.

Credit: Austin Palmer

During our cheese shredding test, the inconsistency was apparent. There were large chunks left unshredded, pieces stuck to the lid, and a fair amount of crumbles left over. The shredding also yielded a weird thick spiral piece or two, leaving us perplexed. It also mutilated our potato test. The potato came out soggy and mushed rather than shredded. Carrots, on the other hand, shredded quite nicely. The only real issue we had here was that it left a good amount un-shredded.

Carrot shredding went quite nicely with the Oster.
Carrot shredding went quite nicely with the Oster.
Credit: Austin Palmer

Slicing


Similar to our lack of shredding options, the Oster offers no customization to the slice size; you pretty much just get what you get. We sliced up a tomato, potato, and zucchini with low expectations, and while these slices fall short compared to the more premium models in our test suite, we were pleasantly surprised by the results.

We were surprised at how cleaning this model sliced tomatoes.
We were surprised at how cleaning this model sliced tomatoes.
Credit: Austin Palmer

The tomato remained un-mutilated but a little tapered. We were quite impressed that it was not simply squished into oblivion. Half of the potato came out nice and evenly sliced, while the other half was extremely tapered.

At least half of our potato slices came out great.
At least half of our potato slices came out great.
Credit: Austin Palmer

The zucchini test was an interesting one. The Oster produces nice even slices while you manually push the vegetable through, but as soon as you recruit the plunger, the consistency of the slicing diminishes. It is difficult to keep longer vegetables upright, and the slices begin to taper. Like most of the other tests we performed, the Oster struggles with consistency here.

The zucchini slicing was going well until we began using the plunger.
The zucchini slicing was going well until we began using the plunger.
Credit: Austin Palmer

Cleaning


The Oster does pretty well in the cleaning metric. When compared to the rest of the items in our test suite, it scored right around average. The bowl, lid, blades, and disc are bisphenol A-free (BPA-free) and therefore dishwasher safe.

Dismantling the Oster is a breeze.
Dismantling the Oster is a breeze.
Credit: Laura Casner

As for hand washing, the blade is quite small and can be a little difficult to clean where it attaches to the shaft. The bowl is a breeze, but sometimes food gets stuck in the plastic bits that secure the lid. The lid is composed of three pieces that can be taken apart and are easy to clean, although there are some channels next to the chute that trap food as well. The pizza dough took quite some time to clean out and proved much easier with a brush than a sponge.

There are a few hard to reach spots when hand washing.
There are a few hard to reach spots when hand washing.
Credit: Laura Casner

Value


While the Oster is inexpensive, it doesn't blow us away in any of the categories we deem the most important. For just a bit more, you can get a device that performs significantly better.

Conclusion


This extremely budget-friendly food processor performed okay across the board. It may be one of the least expensive options we tested, and it did surprise us in certain avenues, like tomato slicing, but overall its performance is sub-par, particularly compared to our top-scoring food processors. If you're after a product that offers an excellent price but does not perform to the highest of standards, the Oster may do the trick.

Hayley Thomas