The world's most in-depth and scientific reviews of tech gear

Nanan Healthy Faucet Review

Based on its performance, we can find very little reason to purchase this water filter
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Price:   $19.00 List
Pros:  Cheap, high flow rate
Cons:  Did not perform well in any of our filtering tests
Manufacturer:   Nanan
By David Wise and Austin Palmer  ⋅  Apr 12, 2018
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30
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#10 of 10
  • Lead Removal - 25% 2
  • Chlorine Removal - 25% 3
  • Mineral Removal - 25% 1
  • Taste - 15% 3
  • Flow - 10% 10

Our Verdict

Performing very poorly in our tests, we were not fans of the Nanan healthy faucet. This faucet didn't really do well in any of our filtering tests, failed to make bad water taste palatable — and on top of all that — imparted a rather funky taste to already purified water. Needless to say, we don't recommend purchasing this filter and would suggest that you look elsewhere for your water filtering needs.


Compare to Similar Products

Our Analysis and Test Results

The Nanan finished at the back of the pack, right behind the PUR Classic. These filters cost about the same, but the *PUR has the distinct advantage of actually doing well in one of our filtering metrics, removing plenty of chlorine from the water.

Earning one of the lowest scores of the group  we would hesitate to recommend the Nanan.
Earning one of the lowest scores of the group, we would hesitate to recommend the Nanan.

Performance Comparison


We purchased all the most promising filters and compared their performance side-by-side to determine which one is the best. Unfortunately, the Nanan fell far short of our expectations, as described below.

This filter did very poorly in our lead removal test.
This filter did very poorly in our lead removal test.

Lead Removal


The Nanan delivered an abysmal performance in our lead removal metric, which accounts for 25% of its overall score. We scored this by mixing up a batch of water with very high lead levels, then ran it through each of the products in our review. We took a sample of the water before and after, then sent them off to a lab to determine the lead levels.

The Nanan only removed about 76% of the lead from the supply water, leaving the filtered water with lead levels almost 40 times higher than what the EPA's standard for drinking water. This earned the Nanan a 2 out of 10.

The Nanan again failed to deliver in our chlorine removal tests.
The Nanan again failed to deliver in our chlorine removal tests.

Chlorine Removal


The Nanan continued its poor performance in this metric, earning a 3 out of 10. We ran two batches of chlorinated water through each filter in this test, one with very high levels and one with low to moderate amounts of chlorine. We used test strips to indicate the concentration. The Nanan failing to make any significant impact to the chlorine level with the highly chlorinated water, with the test strips maxing out when placed in the water both before and after it passed through the filter.

The Nanan did a little better with the lower level chlorinated water, dropping its concentration from the 20-50 ppm mark on the test strip to the 10-20 ppm band. However, this still wasn't really drinkable, being orders of magnitude more chlorinated than most swimming pools.

Continuing a trend  the Nanan again earned one of the lowest scores in our mineral removal test.
Continuing a trend, the Nanan again earned one of the lowest scores in our mineral removal test.

Mineral Removal


Unsurprisingly at this point, the Nanan also did very poorly in this metric. We used salt dissolved in water as our sample mineral, mixing a batch of supply water that had a concentration of around 445 ppm. After running it through the Nanan, we measured the water and found the concentration to be about the same, earning this product a 1 out of 10 when it came to mineral removal, which comprises a quarter of its overall score.

Unsurprising after its earlier performance  the Nanan failed to impress us with the taste of its filtered water.
Unsurprising after its earlier performance, the Nanan failed to impress us with the taste of its filtered water.

Taste


For this metric, accounting for 15% of the overall score, we evaluated and judged how good each filter made the water taste. We scored by having a panel of taste testers try each water sample without knowing which filter produced it. For the first test, we ran clean water through each filter, to see if it added any unsavory flavors. For the second, we ran a batch of objectively awful tasting water — flavored with chlorine and salt — through each product, to see if it could successfully remove the contaminants. The Nanan did neither of these very well, earning it a 3 out of 10 for its paltry performance.

This filter added a stale taste to purified water, making it unpalatable enough that the majority of our testers immediately spat it out, reminiscent of a classic spit-take. This product fared even worse when we ran the nasty tasting water through it, improving its taste by only a minuscule amount.

Flow


For the remaining 10% of the overall score, we evaluated the flow rate for each filter by timing how long it took to fill up a quart agreement. Surprisingly, the Nanan did very well, meriting a 10 out of 10 for its performance. This filter only slightly longer than the unimpeded faucet, 10 seconds compared to 9 seconds.

Value


While this faucet water filter is inexpensive, it doesn't really filter water all that well, making it a poor value.

Conclusion


All in all, we can't really think of a reason to recommend purchasing the Nanan. It doesn't really do much at all to remove contaminants from water and its only redeeming quality is its high flow rate, which is essentially useless if it doesn't actually filter water. We would recommend considering other products, as there are plenty out there that are comparably priced that come with a drastic increase in performance.


David Wise and Austin Palmer