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Maytag M400 SpeedHeat Review

An average performing steam iron at a fair price whose claim to fame is its high temperature rather than its steam output
Maytag M400 SpeedHeat
Credit: Maytag
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Price:   $45 List
Pros:  Hot soleplate, mostly consistent temperatures, nice mist
Cons:  Not enough steam, can't tackle deep wrinkles
Manufacturer:   Maytag
By Michelle Powell and Hayley Thomas  ⋅  Sep 22, 2021
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63
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#6 of 9
  • Ironing Performance - 35% 7
  • Steam Output - 25% 5
  • Ease of Use - 25% 6
  • Heating - 15% 7

Our Verdict

The Maytag M400 SpeedHeat offers a somewhat average ironing experience but performs especially well with cotton and linen. It swiftly smooths out light wrinkles with no issues, but we found that it struggles with deep-set ones. This is most likely due, at least in part, to the lack of steam output and the minimal number of steam holes found on the soleplate. This issue aside, if you are looking for a steam iron that can prioritize heat over steam output and won't break the bank, the SpeedHeat is a fine consideration.

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Maytag M400 SpeedHeat
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Pros Hot soleplate, mostly consistent temperatures, nice mistPowerful steam burst, pointed nose for precision, budget-friendlyEfficiently reduces wrinkles, misty water spray, 400+ steam holes, retractable cordHigh heat, inexpensiveInexpensive, portable
Cons Not enough steam, can't tackle deep wrinklesMinimal steam output, lack of steam holes on soleplateFilling the water tank could be easierPoor steam output, not very maneuverable, generally cheap performanceLacking in power, underwhelming ironing performance
Bottom Line An average performing steam iron at a fair price whose claim to fame is its high temperature rather than its steam outputA high-performing iron equipped with a powerful steam burst and the ability to tackle most fabrics and most wrinklesAn above-average steam iron with a conveniently retractable chord and an ergonomic soleplate that can tackle most wrinklesLow price and a convenient retractable cord help to make up for mediocre steam outputA steam iron that is perfect for travel but is too weak for regular chores at home
Rating Categories Maytag M400 SpeedHeat Black+Decker D3030... CHI Steam Titanium Sunbeam Steam Master Sunbeam Hot-2-Trot
Ironing Performance (35%)
7.0
9.0
8.0
6.0
6.0
Steam Output (25%)
5.0
5.0
8.0
5.0
2.0
Ease Of Use (25%)
6.0
7.0
7.0
6.0
5.0
Heating (15%)
7.0
8.0
5.0
9.0
8.0
Specs Maytag M400 SpeedHeat Black+Decker D3030... CHI Steam Titanium Sunbeam Steam Master Sunbeam Hot-2-Trot
Wattage 1500W 1600W 1700W 1400W 800W
Weight 3.3 lbs 1.9 lbs 2.9 lbs 3 lbs 1.3 lbs
Cord Length 8' 8' 8' 8' 8'
Soleplate Material Stainless Steel Stainless Steel Titanium Infused Ceramic Stainless Steel Non-Stick
Steam Output 23 g/min 22 g/min 55 g/min 20 g/min 6 g/min
Temperature After 5 Minutes of Heating 345.8° F 337.6° F 304° F 359° F 332° F

Our Analysis and Test Results

The M400 SpeedHeat lives up to its name but delivers a somewhat average performance across the board, falling especially short in the ease of use department.

Performance Comparison


A hot-running iron that lacks a bit in the steam department.
A hot-running iron that lacks a bit in the steam department.
Credit: Laura Casner

Ironing Performance


The SpeedHeat smooths out deep wrinkles in cotton and linen in just a few swipes, with no need for additional steam. It glides across cotton without a hitch but sticks to linen just a touch. Our experience with silk was a little different. This steam iron renders a somewhat average result having no issues with normal wrinkles, but deep-set ones, like a crease from being folded for an extended period of time, are more difficult for this iron to handle.

The SpeedHeat also has some issues with polyester. We had to turn the heat up to the silk setting because the synthetic setting did not get hot enough and was mostly ineffective. After adjusting the settings, it tackled most surface wrinkles well, although a couple of really deep-set wrinkles remained visible.

Heating things up with the SpeedHeat.
Heating things up with the SpeedHeat.
Credit: Laura Casner

The soleplate offers a nice shape and can tackle most hard-to-reach spots, like around buttons. However, it is not as agile as some of the other models in our test suite with a more tapered nose. The water sprays in a nice fine mist that dampens your fabric without soaking it, something we appreciate.

The soleplate is decently tapered for agility.
The soleplate is decently tapered for agility.
Credit: Laura Casner

Steam Output


The SpeedHeat is lacking when it comes to steam output. During our hands-on testing, we took into account how much steam was emitted over the course of one minute. We also made it a point to take a good look at the steam hole layout, as this can greatly affect the steam's efficiency.

The SpeedHeat does not offer stellar steam output.
The SpeedHeat does not offer stellar steam output.
Credit: Laura Casner

This iron emits roughly 22 grams of steam per minute from 23 steam holes. While this is far from the lowest performer, it is still quite a bit below our top performers, placing it somewhere in the middle of the pack. The lower steam output and the minimal number of holes are most likely why this iron struggles with deep creases from folds.

Here you can see all 23 steam holes found on the soleplate.
Here you can see all 23 steam holes found on the soleplate.
Credit: Laura Casner

Ease of Use


We paid special attention to the cord, handling, and filling of each steam iron. The SpeedHeat is not a hassle to us, but there is a lot of room for improvement in this category — most notably, its wonky cord. Due to its general shape, there is no good way to coil it securely. The base of the iron under the soleplate is convex, which encourages the cord to slip off, regardless of how tightly you wrap it.

The cords is stiff and won't stay put now matter how you wrap it.
The cords is stiff and won't stay put now matter how you wrap it.
Credit: Laura Casner

The handle is comfortable, and the rubbery finish on top helps improve the grip. It would be more comfortable if it had a smoother edge transition, though. The soleplate shape is nothing to write home about, but the pointy nose is still narrow enough for most detail work. The large fill hole, paired with a lid that folds completely out of the way, makes filling the SpeedHeat easy. However, you need to have decent aim because there is no funnel, which can lead to spillage if you're not careful.

The fill top stays out of the way while filling.
The fill top stays out of the way while filling.
Credit: Laura Casner

Heating


With a name like SpeedHeat, one can only assume that this iron can heat up fast. Indeed, the name is not a misnomer — this iron performs extremely well in this category.

Within just five minutes, the average soleplate temperature was a whopping 345 degrees Fahrenheit. Not only does the SpeedHeat heat up quickly and efficiently, but the soleplate temperature is more consistent than some of the other competitors. There was only a difference of 51 degrees between the hottest and coolest spots on the soleplate.

The SpeedHeat lives up to its name.
The SpeedHeat lives up to its name.
Credit: Laura Casner

Value


The SpeedHeat is a decent value if steam output is less of a priority for you. It is not nearly as expensive as some of the higher-performing options in our test suite, but if your preference is to steam out the toughest of wrinkles, you can find something at a comparable price that will better suit your needs.

Conclusion


If you are looking for heat rather than steam, the Maytag M400 SpeedHeat could be a good option. While it may not emit massive amounts of steam or work out deep fold lines, it does just fine tackling daily wrinkles on cotton and linen.

Michelle Powell and Hayley Thomas